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Rescooped by Ferez Nallaseth from Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
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Mapping the Epigenetic Basis of Complex Traits

Quantifying the impact of heritable epigenetic variation on complex traits is an emerging challenge in population genetics. Here, we analyze a population of isogenic Arabidopsis lines that segregate experimentally induced DNA methylation changes at hundreds of regions across the genome. We demonstrate that several of these differentially methylated regions (DMRs) act as bona fide epigenetic quantitative trait loci (QTLepi), accounting for 60 to 90% of the heritability for two complex traits, flowering time and primary root length. These QTLepi are reproducible and can be subjected to artificial selection. Many of the experimentally induced DMRs are also variable in natural populations of this species and may thus provide an epigenetic basis for Darwinian evolution independently of DNA sequence changes.


Via Jennifer Mach
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Rescooped by Ferez Nallaseth from Cell Therapy & Regenerative Medicine
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Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles | Life Sciences | Scoop.it
Using stem cells may be a way to restore strength to damaged skeletal muscles in the elderly, a new study shows.

Via Ella Buzhor
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Ella Buzhor's curator insight, February 24, 2014 8:55 AM

Muscle regeneration is impaired with aging partially due to functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Aged mice-derived MuSCs have reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. Transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in aged mice-derived MuSCs in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel rejuvenates their regeneration potential. This study paves the way for autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.


http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.3464.html

Rescooped by Ferez Nallaseth from Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
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Gene Therapy Might Grow Replacement Tissue Inside the Body | Duke Pratt School of Engineering

Gene Therapy Might Grow Replacement Tissue Inside the Body | Duke Pratt School of Engineering | Life Sciences | Scoop.it

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:02 PM

Researchers from Duke combined synthetic scaffolds with viral gene delivery techniques to generate cartilage-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The researchers first immobilized lentivirus to poly(ε-caprolactone) films. Then they demonstrated that scaffold-mediated gene delivery of transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3), using a 3D woven poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold, promoted  cartilaginous ECM production by hMSCs.

Full paper: 

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/02/13/1321744111.abstract

 

Learn about cartilage development and related stem cell differentiation protocols:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/cartilage