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Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy: World Record Solar Cell with 44.7% Efficiency

Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy: World Record Solar Cell with 44.7% Efficiency | Life Science | Scoop.it

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Soitec, CEA-Leti and the Helmholtz Center Berlin jointly announced today having achieved a new world record for the conversion of sunlight into electricity using a new solar cell structure with four solar subcells. Surpassing competition after only over three years of research, and entering the roadmap at world class level, a new record efficiency of 44.7% was measured at a concentration of 297 suns. This indicates that 44.7% of the solar spectrum's energy, from ultraviolet through to the infrared, is converted into electrical energy. This is a major step towards reducing further the costs of solar electricity and continues to pave the way to the 50% efficiency roadmap.

Back in May 2013, the German-French team of Fraunhofer ISE, Soitec, CEA-Leti and the Helmholtz Center Berlin had already announced a solar cell with 43.6% efficiency. Building on this result, further intensive research work and optimization steps led to the present efficiency of 44.7%. 

These solar cells are used in concentrator photovoltaics (CPV), a technology which achieves more than twice the efficiency of conventional PV power plants in sun-rich locations. The terrestrial use of so-called III-V multi-junction solar cells, which originally came from space technology, has prevailed to realize highest efficiencies for the conversion of sunlight to electricity. In this multi-junction solar cell, several cells made out of different III-V semiconductor materials are stacked on top of each other. The single subcells absorb different wavelength ranges of the solar spectrum.

“We are incredibly proud of our team which has been working now for three years on this four-junction solar cell,” says Frank Dimroth, Department Head and Project Leader in charge of this development work at Fraunhofer ISE. “This four-junction solar cell contains our collected expertise in this area over many years. Besides improved materials and optimization of the structure, a new procedure called wafer bonding plays a central role. With this technology, we are able to connect two semiconductor crystals, which otherwise cannot be grown on top of each other with high crystal quality. In this way we can produce the optimal semiconductor combination to create the highest efficiency solar cells.” 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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I can't wait for the day that solar energy takes over all of our needs!

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EPFL is developing a tiny, personal blood testing laboratory that implants under your skin

EPFL is developing a tiny, personal blood testing laboratory that implants under your skin | Life Science | Scoop.it

EPFL scientists have developed a tiny, portable personal blood testing laboratory: a minuscule device implanted just under the skin provides an immediate analysis of substances in the body, and a radio module transmits the results to a doctor over the cellular phone network. This feat of miniaturization has many potential applications, including monitoring patients undergoing chemotherapy.

 

Humans are veritable chemical factories - we manufacture thousands of substances and transport them, via our blood, throughout our bodies. Some of these substances can be used as indicators of our health status. A team of EPFL scientists has developed a tiny device that can analyze the concentration of these substances in the blood. Implanted just beneath the skin, it can detect up to five proteins and organic acids simultaneously, and then transmit the results directly to a doctor’s computer. This method will allow a much more personalized level of care than traditional blood tests can provide. Health care providers will be better able to monitor patients, particularly those with chronic illness or those undergoing chemotherapy. The prototype, still in the experimental stages, has demonstrated that it can reliably detect several commonly traced substances.


The device was developed by a team led by EPFL scientists Giovanni de Micheli and Sandro Carrara. The implant, a real gem of concentrated technology, is only a few cubic millimeters in volume but includes five sensors, a radio transmitter and a power delivery system. Outside the body, a battery patch provides 1/10 watt of power, through the patient’s skin – thus there’s no need to operate every time the battery needs changing.

 

Information is routed through a series of stages, from the patient’s body to the doctor’s computer screen. The implant emits radio waves over a safe frequency. The patch collects the data and transmits them via Bluetooth to a mobile phone, which then sends them to the doctor over the cellular network.

 

Great care was taken in developing the sensors. To capture the targeted substance in the body – such as lactate, glucose, or ATP – each sensor’s surface is covered with an enzyme. “Potentially, we could detect just about anything,” explains De Micheli. “But the enzymes have a limited lifespan, and we have to design them to last as long as possible.” The enzymes currently being tested are good for about a month and a half; that’s already long enough for many applications. “In addition, it’s very easy to remove and replace the implant, since it’s so small.”

 

The electronics were a considerable challenge as well. “It was not easy to get a system like this to work on just a tenth of a watt,” de Micheli explains. The researchers also struggled to design the minuscule electrical coil that receives the power from the patch.

 

The prototype has already been tested in the laboratory for five different substances, and proved as reliable as traditional analysis methods. The project brought together eletronics experts, computer scientists, doctors and biologists from EPFL, the Istituto di Ricerca di Bellinzona, EMPA and ETHZ. It is part of the Swiss Nano-Tera program, whose goal is to encourage interdisciplinary research in the environmental and medical fields. Researchers hope the system will be commercially available within 4 years.

 

More wearable technology news here:

 

http://www.pinterest.com/caroltpin/wearable-tech/


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Patricia Nicoll's insight:

Instantaneous sampling and blood results

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Q&A: Bill Gates on Teaching, Ed Tech, and Philanthropy

Q&A: Bill Gates on Teaching, Ed Tech, and Philanthropy | Life Science | Scoop.it
Bill Gates says that listening to classroom teachers will be key if technology is to transform K-12 education.
Patricia Nicoll's insight:

great way to weed through the massive number of apps out there these days!

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Quip - Collaborative word processor for mobile

Quip - Collaborative word processor for mobile | Life Science | Scoop.it

With Quip, you can make your edits right in the shared document, comment on a specific section, and even chat with the other authors directly while you're all making tweaks. Tracked changes show exactly how the draft has evolved.


Via Nik Peachey
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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:08 AM

Useful for collaborative editing of the text...

John Rudkin's curator insight, August 23, 2013 5:41 AM

Gorgeous implementation.  Get it!

Heiko Idensen's curator insight, September 21, 2013 1:22 AM

Quip läuft auf Desktop-Computern (PC und Mac), iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, und Android. Wo immer du auch bist, welches Gerät du auch benutzt - Quip ist dabei und funktioniert.

Gemeinschaftliches Bearbeiten

Mit Quip können alle zur gleichen Zeit an derselben Version des Dokuments arbeiten.

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Humans With Amplified Intelligence Could Be More Powerful Than AI

Humans With Amplified Intelligence Could Be More Powerful Than AI | Life Science | Scoop.it

With much of our attention focused the rise of advanced artificial intelligence, few consider the potential for radically amplified human intelligence (IA). It’s an open question as to which will come first, but a technologically boosted brain could be just as powerful — and just as dangerous – as AI.

 

As a species, we’ve been amplifying our brains for millennia. Or at least we’ve tried to. Looking to overcome our cognitive limitations, humans have employed everything from writing, language, and meditative techniques straight through to today’s nootropics. But none of these compare to what’s in store. Unlike efforts to develop artificial general intelligence (AGI), or even an artificial superintelligence (SAI), the human brain already presents us with a pre-existing intelligence to work with. Radically extending the abilities of a pre-existing human mind — whether it be through genetics, cybernetics or the integration of external devices — could result in something quite similar to how we envision advanced AI.

 

Looking to learn more about this, I contacted futurist Michael Anissimov, a blogger atAccelerating Future and a co-organizer of the Singularity Summit. He’s given this subject considerable thought — and warns that we need to be just as wary of IA as we are AI. The real objective of IA is to create super-Einsteins, persons qualitatively smarter than any human being that has ever lived. There will be a number of steps on the way there.

 

The first step will be to create a direct neural link to information. Think of it as a "telepathic Google." The next step will be to develop brain-computer interfaces that augment the visual cortex, the best-understood part of the brain. This would boost our spatial visualization and manipulation capabilities. Imagine being able to imagine a complex blueprint with high reliability and detail, or to learn new blueprints quickly. There will also be augmentations that focus on other portions of sensory cortex, like tactile cortex and auditory cortex. The third step involves the genuine augmentation of pre-frontal cortex. This is the Holy Grail of IA research — enhancing the way we combine perceptual data to form concepts. The end result would be cognitive super-McGyvers, people who perform apparently impossible intellectual feats. For instance, mind controlling other people, beating the stock market, or designing inventions that change the world almost overnight. This seems impossible to us now in the same way that all our modern scientific achievements would have seemed impossible to a stone age human — but the possibility is real.

 

For it to be otherwise would require that there is some mysterious metaphysical ceiling on qualitative intelligence that miraculously exists at just above the human level. Given that mankind was the first generally intelligent organism to evolve on this planet, that seems highly implausible. We shouldn't expect version one to be the final version, any more than we should have expected the Model T to be the fastest car ever built.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dominic's curator insight, March 26, 6:24 PM

Our brain is a powerful device that has much potential to undertake theories in which we thought was impossible, to reality. This article discovers the ways that we humans can release our cognitive limitations and use the power of the brain to explore innovations that we couldn't even dream of. This also explores how amplified human intelligence (IA) could become more advanced than Human Intelligence. 

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Quantum microscope for revealing living structures in biology

Quantum microscope for revealing living structures in biology | Life Science | Scoop.it

The team, a collaboration between The University of Queensland and the Australian National University, believe their microscope could lead to a better understanding of the basic components of life and eventually allow quantum mechanics to be probed at a macroscopic level. Their world-first discovery has been published in Nature Photonics.

 

Team leader Associate Professor Warwick Bowen, of UQ’s ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, said the study relied on quantum interactions between the photons of light to achieve measurement precision that surpassed conventional measurement. “This ‘quantum microscope’ is a pioneering step towards applications of quantum physics in technology,” Associate Professor Bowen said.

 

“In fundamental physics, it could be immediately applied towards observing phenomena in the microscopic motion of small particles that have yet to be observed and were predicted many decades ago.” In the study, the researchers used their quantum microscope to measure the cytoplasm of a live beer-brewing yeast cell and found they could achieve their measurements 64 per cent faster than with a conventional microscope.

 

Lead author and UQ PhD student Mr Michael Taylor said the results demonstrated for the first time that quantum light could provide a practical advantage in real-world measurements. “The measurements performed could aid in understanding the life-cycle of a cell, as its cytoplasm plays a crucial role in transferring nutrients into and around the cell,” he said.

 

Among other things, the ‘quantum microscope’ could reveal the finer details within a cell – more than a regular microscope. Biological imaging is a particularly important application for quantum light as these fine details are typically only visible when a lot of light is used.

 

“Unfortunately, biological samples are grilled when the power is increased too far,” said Mr Taylor. “The ‘quantum microscope’, on the other hand, provides a way to improve measurement sensitivity without increasing the risk of optical damage to the sample.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Touchcast

Touchcast | Life Science | Scoop.it

TouchCasts are completely clickable. A TouchCast is a video that is fully browsable, responsive, and alive. Webpages, images, and an assembly of video Apps (vApps) can be tapped for a two-way video experience.

It's a TV studio in your hands. Create broadcast-quality videos with a built-in teleprompter, green screen, visual filters, sound effects, and titles. Watch TouchCasts from the app or online


Via Nik Peachey
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Jan Ankerstjerne's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:28 AM

Great app

Hendrika GREEN's curator insight, July 26, 2013 5:49 PM

Looking forward to seeing this one used!

Daily Quotation's curator insight, July 29, 2013 10:49 AM

Brilliant idea!

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Kidblog | Safe and simple blogs for your students.

Kidblog | Safe and simple blogs for your students. | Life Science | Scoop.it

Kidblog is designed for K-12 teachers who want to provide each student with an individual blog. Students publish posts and participate in academic discussions within a secure classroom blogging community. Teachers maintain complete control over student blogs and user accounts.


Via Nik Peachey
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Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 4, 2013 6:59 PM

The "Kid Blog' is a safe and effective way to allow your students to keep up to date blogs in a secure evironment. With these blogs students can not only post their own blogs, but oarticipate in discussions.

I feel this is a gerat resourse to use within the classroom, as students and teachers can keep track of students posts and especially look at their progress throughout the year.

Xyleme Alex's curator insight, August 7, 2013 4:58 PM

Looks like a great tool and it's entirely free. I like that it is based on the Wordpress platform, but removes the clutter and distractions that other blogging services have.

Antonio Tejero Aparicio's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:59 AM

Unaplicaciones recurso en línea muy útil para desarrollar la lectura y la escritura digital. Aquí tenéis un ejemplo

http://kidblog.org/6EnRed/


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A Must See Graphic on Creative Commons for Students

A Must See Graphic on Creative Commons for Students | Life Science | Scoop.it

"Creative Commons is a non-profit that helps sharing and reuse of creativity and knowledge via free legal and technological tools . These tools are not alternatives to copyright laws, rather they work alongside them.

To help you better teach your students about Creative Commons and how it works, here is a handy graphic that visually captures the main important things students need to know about Creative commons. Enjoy"


Via John Evans, Karen Bonanno, Dennis T OConnor
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KB...Konnected's curator insight, August 2, 2013 9:16 PM

This info is also good for teachers who sell products through TpT and Teacher's Notebook.

Dawne Tortorella's curator insight, August 10, 2013 6:36 PM

Actually good for faculty too!

johanna krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 1:54 PM

graphic on creative commons

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Two Video Guides to Website Evaluation

Two Video Guides to Website Evaluation | Life Science | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor
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Lourense Das's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:13 AM

Two interesting videos on website evaluation from www.freetech4teachers.com

Dean Mantz's curator insight, July 29, 2013 12:33 AM

I would like to add to Beth Dicther's share, via Richard Byrne's Free Technology 4 Teachers, that website evaluation skills should be a necessity for any student and educator regardless of online or face-to-face. 

johanna krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 1:57 PM

website evaluation

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The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic

The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic | Life Science | Scoop.it

Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test. But assessments do have value, and an important place in our learning structure. By measuring what students are learning, we as teachers can look at how we are approaching different subjects, materials, and even different students. The handy infographic takes a look at different types of assessments and their attributes and questions. Keep reading to learn more.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Shea Stehm's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:41 PM

Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test. But assessments do have value, and an important place in our learning structure. By measuring what students are learning, we as teachers can look at how we are approaching different subjects, materials, and even different students.

Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:02 AM

Do you like standardized testing?

Can we stop measuring  students?

Dee KC's curator insight, August 6, 2013 3:25 PM

following the DfE's assessing without levels guidance this looks like  god place to start when reviewing how you measure progress

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How To Create A Perfect Tweet [INFOGRAPHIC]

How To Create A Perfect Tweet [INFOGRAPHIC] | Life Science | Scoop.it
Much has been written about how to write the perfect tweet, from what link shortener to use to how many characters to leave room for retweets.
Now the folks at Neomobile have tried their hand at creating a guide to composing the perfect tweet.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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Pyramid Point Acct.'s curator insight, March 9, 8:44 AM

how to write a best tweet....

Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, March 13, 7:58 AM

Great Brian Yanish share (as always).

Tamasa Nelson's curator insight, March 16, 10:49 PM

Info graphics are a great way to assemble and distribute information, especially data in one document. Teachers can request their students to compile data and create a visual to share quantifiable information.

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | Life Science | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."


Via Seth Dixon
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oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 3:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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MIT develops system to write computer code using ordinary language

MIT develops system to write computer code using ordinary language | Life Science | Scoop.it

In a pair of recent papers, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have demonstrated that it is possible to write computer programs using ordinary language rather than special-purpose programming languages. A new algorithm can automatically convert natural-language specifications into "regular expressions" — special-purpose combinations of symbols that allow very flexible searches of digital files.

The work may be of some help to programmers, and it could let nonprogrammers manipulate common types of files — like word-processing documents and spreadsheets — in ways that previously required familiarity with programming languages. But the researchers’ methods could also prove applicable to other programming tasks, expanding the range of contexts in which programmers can specify functions using ordinary language.

“I don’t think that we will be able to do this for everything in programming, but there are areas where there are a lot of examples of how humans have done translation,” says Regina Barzilay, an associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering and a co-author on both papers. “If the information is available, you may be able to learn how to translate this language to code.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Skip Stein's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:12 AM

This used to be called COBOL!  Now they are trying to 'invent' English language programming AGAIN?  There was also a 'language' called 'ENGLISH' by MicroData decades ago (early precursor to SQL).  If COBOL would have been allowed to progress, we wouldn't be coding in C+ and other low level languages.  Thanks to Microsoft who torpedoed the entire computer language development. (IMHO)

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, July 15, 2013 7:13 AM

I am really wondering how would my daily vocal output look like in form of RegEx. However it is a nice achievement that we can map human language to regular expression formula. Still I personally think that successful implementation of AI which will be able to foresee human mistakes will be necessary before such a conversions can take place in daily life.

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Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy: World Record Solar Cell with 44.7% Efficiency

Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy: World Record Solar Cell with 44.7% Efficiency | Life Science | Scoop.it

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Soitec, CEA-Leti and the Helmholtz Center Berlin jointly announced today having achieved a new world record for the conversion of sunlight into electricity using a new solar cell structure with four solar subcells. Surpassing competition after only over three years of research, and entering the roadmap at world class level, a new record efficiency of 44.7% was measured at a concentration of 297 suns. This indicates that 44.7% of the solar spectrum's energy, from ultraviolet through to the infrared, is converted into electrical energy. This is a major step towards reducing further the costs of solar electricity and continues to pave the way to the 50% efficiency roadmap.

Back in May 2013, the German-French team of Fraunhofer ISE, Soitec, CEA-Leti and the Helmholtz Center Berlin had already announced a solar cell with 43.6% efficiency. Building on this result, further intensive research work and optimization steps led to the present efficiency of 44.7%. 

These solar cells are used in concentrator photovoltaics (CPV), a technology which achieves more than twice the efficiency of conventional PV power plants in sun-rich locations. The terrestrial use of so-called III-V multi-junction solar cells, which originally came from space technology, has prevailed to realize highest efficiencies for the conversion of sunlight to electricity. In this multi-junction solar cell, several cells made out of different III-V semiconductor materials are stacked on top of each other. The single subcells absorb different wavelength ranges of the solar spectrum.

“We are incredibly proud of our team which has been working now for three years on this four-junction solar cell,” says Frank Dimroth, Department Head and Project Leader in charge of this development work at Fraunhofer ISE. “This four-junction solar cell contains our collected expertise in this area over many years. Besides improved materials and optimization of the structure, a new procedure called wafer bonding plays a central role. With this technology, we are able to connect two semiconductor crystals, which otherwise cannot be grown on top of each other with high crystal quality. In this way we can produce the optimal semiconductor combination to create the highest efficiency solar cells.” 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Patricia Nicoll's insight:

I can't wait for the day that solar energy takes over all of our needs!

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Whiteboard

Whiteboard | Life Science | Scoop.it

A Web Whiteboard is touch-friendly online whiteboard app that lets you use your computer, tablet or smartphone to easily draw sketches, collaborate with others and share them with the world


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:57 AM

This is a nice simple browser based whiteboard app that runs in the browser on most devices. Would be nice to have a few more features, such as import images etc, but there is also a lot to be said for simplicity.

Nenad Mirkov's curator insight, August 7, 2013 7:11 AM

Easy and usefull :)

Lorie Callander's curator insight, August 16, 2013 11:45 AM

I am trying this too. We'll see. There is also a teacher sign-up for limited sharing with and among students etc. I just want a whiteboard that I can easily access without making plans to leave my classroom to go to where the, difficult to navigate and use, whiteboard is.

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Species Evolution Not Fast Enough to Cope With a Changing World

Species Evolution Not Fast Enough to Cope With a Changing World | Life Science | Scoop.it

Scientists know that climate change is putting species around the globe in peril, but just how much peril? After all, when evolution failed to keep pace with a major climatic event 65 million years ago, half the planet's species went extinct and dinosaurs were reduced to jittery feathered creatures that get bullied by squirrels on bird-feeders. A new study suggests that our current era of climate change won't just exceed the rate of evolution, but will do so by a factor of thousands. Although the work doesn't go so far as predicting an extinction rate, it doesn't bode well for the near future of global biodiversity.

 

The world has warmed 0.6°C in the past few decades, and climate models say that we could see another 4° by century's end. "We want to know if species will be able to adapt to climate change quickly enough based on how they adapted to climate change in the past," says evolutionary ecologist John Wiens, of the University of Arizona in Tucson, and lead author of the new study. Wiens decided to investigate by looking at the top branches of family trees.

 

When two living species are closely related, scientists can estimate how long ago they diverged, thus providing an age for their common ancestor. Researchers can also estimate temperature and precipitation in that ancestor's habitat, using evolutionary models. With help from Yale University biology student Ignacio Quintero, Wiens calculated such estimates for 540 species in 17 groups of living vertebrates. They studied reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals primarily native to North and Central America, but with some European, Asian, Australian, South American, and African species as well. Then they used global climate models to determine how the local climate of each species is expected to change by the end of this century.

 

Despite differences in local climate and in the vertebrates themselves, the results were consistent. The average rate of adaptation for 15 of the 17 groups was less than 1°C per million years. Two groups adapted slightly faster, but still below 2° per million years. So if a frog breeds in autumn because the temperature is right, it might adapt to warmer temperatures by breeding in December, January, or February. And lizards that survive on those eggs might have to change their diet. But the study found that such adaptations typically occur about 10,000 to 100,000 times too slowly to keep pace with global warming projections for the year 2100. The researchers reached the same conclusion for the expected regional increases and decreases in rainfall: Again, the species adapted 10,000 to 100,000 times too slowly.

 

Adapting too slowly does not mean certain death. A species can relocate. But due to habitat destruction and other factors, not all species can move. If a rodent lives on a mountain and warmer temperatures compel the animal to climb higher, it may run out of mountain while temperatures keep rising.

 

Wiens was surprised by the results because they suggest that the studied species, which typically adapt to less than 1°C of change per million years, now must adapt to 4° between now and the year 2100. "It's almost crazy to think that they're going to, in just a few decades, be more different than they've become over millions of years," he says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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CCJD's curator insight, March 10, 7:07 PM

humans need to slow down climate change by finding an alternate fuel source to replace fossil fuels and find other solutions to reduce the pace of greenhouse gas emissions. if we do not, precious animal life could be lost in the future.

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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Life Science | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.

 

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:58 AM

WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

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Advances in Technology Enhanced Learning

Advances in Technology Enhanced Learning | Life Science | Scoop.it

Advances in Technology Enhanced Learning’ presents a range of research projects which aim to explore how to make engagement in learning (and teaching) more passionate. This interactive and experimental resource discusses innovations which pave the way to open collaboration at scale. The book introduces methodological and technological breakthroughs via twelve chapters to learners, instructors, and decision-makers in schools, universities, and workplaces.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Gina Martin's curator insight, August 11, 2013 3:46 PM

Looking forward to reading this one. 

Guillermo Pérez's comment, August 11, 2013 10:21 PM
You can view mor information at: https://itunes.apple.com/book/advances-in-technology-enhanced/id663022333?ls=1
Guillermo Pérez's comment, August 11, 2013 10:22 PM
You can view mor information at: https://itunes.apple.com/book/advances-in-technology-enhanced/id663022333?ls=1
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Kidblog | Safe and simple blogs for your students.

Kidblog | Safe and simple blogs for your students. | Life Science | Scoop.it

Kidblog is designed for K-12 teachers who want to provide each student with an individual blog. Students publish posts and participate in academic discussions within a secure classroom blogging community. Teachers maintain complete control over student blogs and user accounts.


Via Nik Peachey
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Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 4, 2013 6:59 PM

The "Kid Blog' is a safe and effective way to allow your students to keep up to date blogs in a secure evironment. With these blogs students can not only post their own blogs, but oarticipate in discussions.

I feel this is a gerat resourse to use within the classroom, as students and teachers can keep track of students posts and especially look at their progress throughout the year.

Xyleme Alex's curator insight, August 7, 2013 4:58 PM

Looks like a great tool and it's entirely free. I like that it is based on the Wordpress platform, but removes the clutter and distractions that other blogging services have.

Antonio Tejero Aparicio's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:59 AM

Unaplicaciones recurso en línea muy útil para desarrollar la lectura y la escritura digital. Aquí tenéis un ejemplo

http://kidblog.org/6EnRed/


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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | Life Science | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:42 PM

Useful for consideration of Fish as a resource in the topic Natural Resource Use in Global Challenges. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:11 PM
its scary to see how much fishing grew over the pat years due to the growing population
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Overtime as the population has increased you can see on the map that areas have been over fished. This has caused people to move near the water to fish and it has created some jobs for them. This could be bad becuase as the population increases the fish will decrease due to the over fishing. 

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Flipped Classroom: 40 Sources for Curated Educational Videos

Flipped Classroom: 40 Sources for Curated Educational Videos | Life Science | Scoop.it
Fortunately, there are some great websites and services that take the guesswork out of finding and sorting educational video content. Here is the most updated list of some of the curated video site...

 

Like explorers approaching an unfamiliar landscape, teachers who are ready to take the plunge into flipped classrooms and blended learning often approach the opportunity with a mix of excitement and trepidation.Just dipping a toe into the virtual waters of online content can be overwhelming, and there’s a risk that even the most fearless educator can become paralyzed by the bottomless depths of content and endless pools of resources.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Pinterest Tools for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Pinterest Tools for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Life Science | Scoop.it

by Med Kharbach

 

"While I was leafing through some of the articles on Social Intelligence it dawned on me to do a quick write up to share with you some very useful tools teachers and educators can use to tap into the full potential of Pinterest.

"I know from your interaction with what I post in Pinterest for Teacher's page here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning that several of you are using Pinterest for professional development purposes.The tools below will definitely help you better your pinning experience. All of these tools are included in the infographic created and shared by Irma Zimmerman. Enjoy"


Via Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor
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Infogr.am Charts for Excel

Infogr.am Charts for Excel | Life Science | Scoop.it
Create infographics and interactive online charts. It's free and super-easy! Follow other users and discover amazing data stories!

Via Baiba Svenca
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Ali Anani's curator insight, July 28, 2013 12:45 AM

Make great charts for free

LundTechIntegration's curator insight, July 29, 2013 9:17 AM

I love this. 

Victor GraphicSave's comment, August 3, 2013 9:08 AM
Nice Post Visit My Logo Designs http://graphicsave.com/logo-designs
http://graphicsave.com/restaurant-logo
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A groundbreaking project called Aireal lets you actually feel virtual objects

A groundbreaking project called Aireal lets you feel virtual objects. Aireal is the result of research by University of Illinois PhD student Rajinder Sodhi and Disney Reseach’s Ivan Poupyrev. When set by your television or connected to an iPad, this diminutive machine will puff air rings that allow you to actually feel objects and textures in midair — no special controllers or gloves required.

 

The machine itself is essentially a set of five speakers in a box — subwoofers that track your body through IR, then fire low frequencies through a nozzle to form donut-like vortices.

 

In practice, Aireal can do anything from creating a button for you to touch in midair to crafting whole textures by pulsing its bubbles to mimic water, stone, and sand. … A single Aireal could conceivably support multiple people, and a grid of Aireals could create extremely immersive rooms, creating sensations like a flock of birds flying by.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Marie Rippen's curator insight, July 24, 2013 2:15 PM

Besides entertainment, this could have applications in physical therapy, education, advertising--anything you can think of where communicating the sensation of touch is important. Although, the first thing that popped into my head was Star Trek... holodeck anyone?

 

 
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UK’s $90 million Skylon to ‘transform how we access space’

UK’s $90 million Skylon to ‘transform how we access space’ | Life Science | Scoop.it

Skylon, a revolutionary UK spacecraft which could take adventurers to Earth’s stratosphere in just 15 minutes or fly travelers to Australia in four hours, will get $90 million from the government. The challenge is to cut the cost of space travel.

 

Skylon boasts a hybrid jet-rocket engine, SABRE (Synergistic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine), capable of blasting into low earth orbit. It takes off from a standard runway before accelerating to speeds of 19,000 miles per hour.

The Minister for Universities and Science says “SABRE has the potential to completely transform how we access space.”

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, July 18, 2013 11:14 PM

Nice project. Competition for Virgin Galactic? Or the future of air travel?