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What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie

What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie | Life or something like it... | Scoop.it

The Zombie, which is only increasing its popularity in films, comic books, and classic novel mash-ups, is an image that hardly needs an introduction.  They are dead people returned from the grave, wandering around the land, and groaning after the living.  Side-stepping the gory details, the classic Zombie is easy to recognize:   Insatiable hunger, a monotonously numbing routine, and a lack of individual choice are three primary characteristics of this pattern.  Any act, from voracious spending to pursuing increasing amounts of attention, qualifies as long as what you gain is never enough.

 

This is not consuming for sustenance, but as a temporary fulfillment, stilling any discontent and numbing you to the... (click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
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Laura M. Smith's curator insight, November 1, 2013 5:24 PM

I have experienced zombies in my dreams. They often represent that part of me that is related to how I avoid feeling, how I avoid being in relationship. Mindless, numb, insatiable hunger for <insert your favorite flavor of human flesh>. It can represent a type of dissociation that maybe be prevalent as a version of bardo that keeps us from our higher selves and our connection to the Divine.

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Dreams—Big and Little: What dreams can tell us about our life

Dreams—Big and Little: What dreams can tell us about our life | Life or something like it... | Scoop.it

I am, of course, referring to night dreaming—(day dreaming when one simply goes ‘off the air’ and continues one’s daily routine on ‘automatic pilot’, so to speak, is an aspect of consciousness which I will discuss at some future date). At this point I want to talk about the significant role our night dreams play in bringing us to become aware of the course our life is taking.

 

Over the weeks and months that Carl Jung would devote to the dialogue with his patients—a form oftherapy designed to bring them to a higher degree of self-knowledge—he would question them about their night dreams, and bring them to distinguish between those that were significant as Big Dreams—and those which were relatively insignificant as Little Dreams: (terminologies and distinctions also long employed by Australia’s Aboriginal peoples.)

 

Big Dreams are those that remain clearly in the waking memory for days, weeks, or even... (click title for more)


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THE SACRED ART Of ALCHEMY

THE SACRED ART Of ALCHEMY | Life or something like it... | Scoop.it

Much to his astonishment, C. G. Jung discovered that the ancient art of alchemy was describing, in symbolic language, the journey that all of us must take towards embodying our own intrinsic wholeness, what he called the process of “individuation.”

 

As Jung wrote, “I had very soon seen that analytical psychology [the psychology Jung developed] coincided in a most curious way with alchemy. The experiences of the alchemists, were, in a sense, my experiences, and their world was my world. This was, of course, a momentous discovery. I had stumbled upon the historical counterpart of my psychology of the unconscious.”

 

The alchemists, over the course of centuries, had generated a wide range of symbolic images which directly corresponded to the anatomy of the unconscious which Jung had been mapping through his painstaking work with... (click title for more)


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Michael Goodman's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:27 PM

Thank you Bonnie B, this is my first introduction to Paul Levy, I am very appreciative for the work you do culling these gems for us