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The Abrasiveness Trap: High-achieving men and women are described differently in reviews

The Abrasiveness Trap: High-achieving men and women are described differently in reviews | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it
Does gender play a role in the type of feedback an employee receives at review time? We had a linguist crunch the numbers.

Not long ago I was talking to an engineering manager who was preparing performance reviews for his team. He had two people he wanted to promote that year, but he was worried that his peers were only going to endorse one of them. “Jessica is really talented,” he said. “But I wish she’d be less abrasive. She comes on too strong.” Her male counterpart? “Steve is an easy case,” he went on. “Smart and great to work with. He needs to learn to be a little more patient, but who doesn’t?”
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Do you think perception of female abrasiveness undermines women’s careers in technology?

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Rethink What You “Know” About High-Achieving Women

As researchers who have spent more than 20 years studying professional women, we have watched with interest the recent surge in attention paid to women’s careers, work-family conflict, and the gender gap in leadership. Among the most visible contributions to this public conversation have been Anne-Marie Slaughter’s 2012 Atlantic article “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All” and Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In, both of which ignited fierce public debate.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Harvard research has found not just achievement and satisfaction gaps between men and women, but a real gap between what women expect as they look ahead to their careers and where they ultimately land.

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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, December 2, 10:10 PM

The highly educated, ambitious women and men of HBS don’t differ much in terms of what they value and hope for in their lives and careers...

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8 Female Leaders On How To Overcome What's Holding Women Back

8 Female Leaders On How To Overcome What's Holding Women Back | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

“Who or what is your worst enemy?” If you ask women leaders this question, you might find a lot of the answers to be “myself.”


It doesn’t matter that we’ve come a long way. We’re educated, we’re climbing--and excelling--in corporate ranks. When you’ve been fighting so hard to get to the top for so long, it’s easy to convince yourself that luck had a hand on your success.


According to authors Katty Kay and Claire Shipman in their book The Confidence Code, women tend to struggle with a lack of confidence disproportionately. When something goes wrong professionally, women blame themselves while crediting others when things go right.


Kay and Shipman also found that women are more likely to be perfectionists and hold themselves back from asking for a raise or even answering a question until they’re 100% sure the outcome will be as they predicted.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Societal pressure, gender bias, insecurity--these leaders have all felt weighed down at some point. Here's how they took back the control.

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Age and Gender Matter in Viral Marketing

Age and Gender Matter in Viral Marketing | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

To gain better insight into what makes people share content online, Fractl studied the emotions associated with viral marketing campaigns, plotting the ones that are most commonly associated with viral content on Robert Plutchik’s comprehensive Wheel of Emotions:


  1. Curiosity
  2. Amazement
  3. Interest
  4. Astonishment
  5. Uncertainty


Then, we looked more closely to see how certain demographics respond to different types of content.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Nearly every digital marketer has a goal of creating a viral campaign. Getting mass exposure for high-quality content provides huge value to clients, but it’s not always easy to pull off; it takes an understanding of the complexity of human emotion and how it plays into consuming and sharing content online.

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Kay Summers's curator insight, August 21, 4:21 AM

Capturing Attention can be hard

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The Facts Show It: Female CEOs Are More Likely Than Men To Be Fired

The Facts Show It: Female CEOs Are More Likely Than Men To Be Fired | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

The perception that high-achieving businesswomen are more vulnerable than their male counterparts to being abruptly fired – pushed off the "glass cliff" in the contemporary corporate vernacular – has been borne out by a new study from a global management consultancy.


Researchers at Strategy& found that women are forced out of chief executive positions more than a third of the time, while only a quarter of men in similar positions suffer the same fate.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

New research in the US has found that women working in a high-ranking position in a company are more often fired than their male counterparts.

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No Battle of the Sexes, our Brains just Wire Differently

No Battle of the Sexes, our Brains just Wire Differently | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Women can't parallel park and men can't communicate with emotional intelligence. These common stereotypes get used as ammunition in the so-called battle between the sexes.


But, a new study by the University of Pennsylvania provides support for these (often unfair) standards.


Previous studies have looked at brain size; men's tend to be around 10 per cent bigger than women's, and composition; men have more white matter in their brains, which is linked to motor skills, while women have more grey matter, which is linked to sensory perception such as seeing and hearing, memory, emotions, and speech.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Women can't parallel park and men can't communicate with emotional intelligence. These common stereotypes get used as ammunition in the so-called battle between the sexes.

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Dionne's curator insight, December 3, 2013 9:27 PM

Are differences in the brain a result of nature, or nurture or both? Interesting to learn about but my concern remains as ever to value similarities and differences and be aware of our personal biases in assessing which qualities are 'preferable'. 

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Advice for Young Women in the Workplace

Advice for Young Women in the Workplace | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

The New York imes asked readers to give their own advice to women who are early in their careers. Here are excerpts from the more than 500 responses.


You can also access a story "Still Fighting the Headwinds" where 4 executives are asked on advice on succeeding in business as a woman.

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Anjuli Patel's curator insight, December 10, 11:24 AM

I'm not sure if I agree with all of the advice given-mainly because most of them were targeted toward women in a way that makes them seem inherently inferior in the workplace.

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Increasing Female Workforce Participation - The Key to Boosting Productivity

Increasing Female Workforce Participation - The Key to Boosting Productivity | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Untapped opportunity – The role of women in unlocking Australia’s productivity potential, a study conducted by EY in conjunction with Chief Executive Women (CEW), quantifies what low female workforce participation is costing Australia and explores opportunities to increase representation of women across all industries and at all levels.

The report found that, by employing more productive female workers in flexible roles, Australia and New Zealand could collectively save at least $1.4 billion in wasted wages.


According to EY advisory partner Amy Poynton, increased female workforce participation is the key to boosting Australia’s productivity.

“At the heart of the issue is flexible work arrangements. Organisations need to introduce or expand their work options to better attract and retain women,” Amy said.


“Our research shows that women in flexible roles waste only 11.1%, compared to an average 14.5% for the rest of the working population. When you consider that 43.2% of women in the workforce work part-time compared to 13.5% of men this translates into a significant productivity bonus that few employers are recognising,” she said.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

Women working flexibly waste less time compared to the rest of the working population according to a new EY report released today.

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RUCIBIGANGO mary's comment, July 25, 2013 2:22 AM
let them (women) contribute to the global economy!
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E&Y Studies the Connection Between Female Executives and Sports

E&Y Studies the Connection Between Female Executives and Sports | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it


Research shows that women and girls who participate in sports are less likely to take drugs, engage in abusive relationships, or have unwanted pregnancies. And they are more likely to graduate from high school, receive post-graduate degrees, and earn more money.


A new study, coinciding with the 41st Anniversary of Title IX,  released by accounting firm Ernst & Young has added an additional benefit of Title IX and the impact of participating in sports – becoming a C-suite business executive.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

EY conducted a global survey to gather women leaders’ perspectives on sport and high-performance teams.

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Jesse Gottesdiener's curator insight, October 14, 11:19 PM

I learned that women who have played sport at some level have more attributes that make them better workers than those who didn't play sports. The information that i found the most interesting was the statistic about the difference in the jobs between women who played sports as a working adult. Around 65% of females that played sports as a working female had board level jobs. I selected this article because I wanted to learn about the connection between people who played sports and jobs. This information will help me in the sports management industry when I am looking for people to hire in my business, because ill be likely to hire people that played sports at some point 

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These Are The 30 Most Important Women Under 30 In Tech

These Are The 30 Most Important Women Under 30 In Tech | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Women are (relatively) few and far between in the tech industry.

They make up less than 10% of venture capitalists, and they leave the industry at twice the rate of men, according to a recent study by the Kauffman Foundation. 

There’s also a shortage of women pursuing engineering, particularly software engineering.

But the women who do choose to enter the tech industry in one way or another are doing incredibly important work. 

Over the last couple of weeks, Business Insider accepted nominations for the most important women 30 years old or under in tech. They combined those nominations with their own research to give readers a definitive list and ranking.

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The G20's Best and Worst Countries for Women

The G20's Best and Worst Countries for Women | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it
The G20 represents the 20 top global economies in the world (19 countries, plus the European Union).

The leaders of these countries meet annually at a summit, to shape global policy and create worldwide social change. In 2011 we helped the Thomson Reuters Foundation visualize the 5 Most Dangerous Countries for Women, exposing some of the most shocking realities that women face in the world. Based on the success of that project, Reuters asked us to illustrate the powerful G20's own record on women's rights. The annual G20 summit is happening again this year on June 18th. It is a chance for world leaders to make lasting change in the world.
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