Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Connecting executives to the latest business-related content to help you innovate and inspire.
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How This Founder Grew His Company From 10 to 400 Employees in a Single Year

How This Founder Grew His Company From 10 to 400 Employees in a Single Year | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

One of the hardest things for any entrepreneur to figure out (after how to make money) is building a healthy, focused, powerful company culture.


It's easier said than done, especially in today's world of outsourcing, teams that live across the country from each other, virtual assistants, etc.


However, I've seen, time and again, that when a company knows how to make money AND gets their culture right, they're pretty much guaranteed to succeed. One without the other doesn't last long.

To drill down into the magic of doing this, I invited my good friend Gunnar Lovelace onto The School of Greatness.


Gunnar is the founder of the super-successful online warehouse of health foods at wholesale prices, Thrive Market.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 23, 4:39 PM

The key to creating incredible culture at a company is to attract the best talent and employees who are aligned with the purpose behind the work.

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Why the Next Steve Jobs Will Be a Woman

Why the Next Steve Jobs Will Be a Woman | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Here's an experiment: Name five iconic entrepreneurs. Actually, don't bother, because we can pretty much predict your answer. Every year, we ask the Inc. 500 honorees to name the entrepreneurs they most admire. The answers: Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Mark Cuban, and Bill Gates. We've also seen Mark Zuckerberg and Tony Hsieh. The list varies a bit each year, but one constant remains: They're all men.


That may not seem like much of a problem. After all, the entire country, and in many cases much of the world, has benefited from the contributions of these men: the jobs they've created, the technologies they've built, the instant access to European footwear. So what does it matter if they're all sporting a Y chromosome?

The Learning Factor's insight:

A rising tide of female founders will produce the next iconic entrepreneur.

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