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Why Millennials Annoy Their Elders

Why Millennials Annoy Their Elders | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

What is it about millennials that captivates the minds of older folk like me, tantalizing and infuriating them at the same time? You’d think that an older generation had never given way to a younger one before, except that this is the same basic motion that has spared our species from extinction for a million years or more.


Have we forgotten what parents said about their kids in the fifties, when the kids started rockin’ out to Bill Haley and the Comets?

The Learning Factor's insight:

The millennial generation is the canary in the coal mine for the old working world. It is going away anyway — millennials are only calling our attention to it, and maybe pushing the pace a little.

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Work-Related Age Bias Hits Home for Boomers

Work-Related Age Bias Hits Home for Boomers | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it


Some argue that the Great Recession is in the rear-view mirror. That’s not the case if you’re a layoff victim over a certain age and if you’ve been unemployed for nearly a year – or longer.


Age bias is a concern for around two-thirds of workers over 45, as reported recently in The New York Times Bucks Blog and by MarketWatch.com. In the MarketWatch Working Retirement column, Andrea Coombes  poses an interesting question: are some boomers themselves are guilty of age bias? If you want to get a sense of how some experienced workers feel about age bias, go to those links and and read the comments (and please weigh in with comments here as well).


The stories cite figures from Staying Ahead of the Curve 2013: AARP’s Multicultural Work and Career Study. The study, conducted previously in 2002 and in 2007, paints a revealing picture of workers ages 45-74: their reasons for working, perceived job security, differential treatment received because of age, their ideal work scenario, the challenges they face, their plans for retirement, and more. Also worth a look: an Infographic on the the “new normal” for experienced workers, and a personal perspective on age bias against the long-term unemployed via this Inside E Street clip.

The Learning Factor's insight:

WorkSome argue that the Great Recession is in the rear-view mirror. That’s not the case if you’re a layoff victim over a certain age and if you’ve been unemployed for nearly a year – or longer.

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