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Best Advice I Ever Got: Have the Courage to Follow Your Vision

Best Advice I Ever Got: Have the Courage to Follow Your Vision | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

I attribute much of our success to three pieces of advice that have become our guiding principles:


1. Ask, "How much do I really want it?"


My high school crew coach told me that success only depends on one thing: how much you really want it. The difference between winning and losing, he would say, is nothing more than deciding that you want to win.

 

This advice has had a huge impact on my life and career. Every time I've dreamt up a new idea or venture, my coach's words have come to mind: How much do you really want this?

 

Asking yourself this question forces you to pause and evaluate the situation honestly. Do you have a true passion for it? Are you ready to do whatever it takes to make it work? Taking a genuine look at how much something matters to you will help you weed out certain projects and make time for the ones that truly captivate you.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

You're the captain of your own ship, so at the end of the day, you must trust yourself to do what's right.

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AHORA MAS RECURSOS HUMANOS's curator insight, September 15, 2014 5:14 AM

Although not always success is just a matter of your decision to get it, it is interesting this article

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12 Entrepreneurs Share The Best Advice They Received From A Teacher

12 Entrepreneurs Share The Best Advice They Received From A Teacher | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

1. Don’t Let Bad Days Stop You


“My 12th-grade anthropology teacher told me: ‘When you’re feeling bad, do the work and let the feelings take care of themselves.’ This turned out to be great advice for running a business. Every startup, even the most successful, is a roller coaster. When the bad days hit, you can’t let them stop you. I’ve found that the act of doing the work often makes you feel better.”


2. Be Precise


“My second-grade teacher, Ms. Caruso, gave us a seemingly simple writing assignment: Describe how to build a peanut butter sandwich. On the day we turned in our assignments Ms. Caruso had bread, silverware, and jars of peanut butter and jelly.



Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

From fostering character to keeping things simple, it’s often words of wisdom that teachers offer during casual conversations or informational sidebars that have the biggest impact on students.

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Nelly Renard's curator insight, September 5, 2014 1:18 AM

1. DON’T LET BAD DAYS STOP YOU
“My 12th-grade anthropology teacher told me: ‘When you’re feeling bad, do the work and let the feelings take care of themselves.’ This turned out to be great advice for running a business. Every startup, even the most successful, is a roller coaster. When the bad days hit, you can’t let them stop you. I’ve found that the act of doing the work often makes you feel better.” ...

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The New Habit Challenge: Wake Up Insanely Early

The New Habit Challenge: Wake Up Insanely Early | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

There are so many proponents out there for starting your day early, it’s kind of hard to ignore this advice--though for my entire life I’ve always preferred shrugging the idea off and hitting the snooze button more times than I can count.


“Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.” Yeah, okay Ben Franklin, I’ll take that under advisement.


But it seems like almost any successful person you can think of starts their morning insanely early: Square CEO Jack Dorsey rises at 5:30 a.m., Virgin Group founder Richard Branson wakes around 5:45 a.m., and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz gets up at 4:30 a.m. every morning--good thing he has an infinite supply of coffee at his disposal.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

 Suggesting you rise before the sun is even up may seem a little mean. So we'll wake our groggy selves up, too, for some extra motivation.

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 4, 2014 1:50 AM

There is so much in this article that rings true. I, myself wake up at five in the morning and then go for a half an hour walk. It is that magical hour where you can plan for the whole day. Since I also do a lot of creative writing, I use this time to search for ideas and thoughts  that I can use while writing. 

Denise Griffitts's curator insight, August 4, 2014 10:34 AM

This is something that comes very naturally to me as I sleep very little anyway. Mornings, for me at least, are the most productive time of day. I also use this time before dawn to review my weekly goals and decide what one thing I can do TODAY to move myself closer to accomplishing that goal. And then I go do it!

howtoselllaptop's curator insight, August 5, 2014 12:52 AM

Ya ..! i just agree to it

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Why We Ignore Advice When We Need It The Most

Why We Ignore Advice When We Need It The Most | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it
Our brains are susceptible to a range of cognitive biases that lead us to ignore important information and advice.

This is because everyone’s beliefs are susceptible to a range of cognitive biases, or distorted patterns of thinking, which can hinder our learning and knowledge of how the world really works.

Due to these biases, we often ignore important advice or information that could otherwise be helpful to our lives.

If we hear something that’s true or helpful – but it doesn’t fit into our current worldview – our minds will often reject it to preserve the older belief.

So instead of learning something new, we’d rather protect our egos and self-esteem. We try to backwards rationalize our current belief, so that we don’t have to admit we were mistaken or wrong.

Can you see how this pattern hurts our ability to attain new knowledge?
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What I Wish I Knew About Creativity When I Was 20

What I Wish I Knew About Creativity When I Was 20 | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

Imagine you could go back in time and give your 20-year-old self a bit of advice on investing in the creative process, coming up with new ideas, and producing good, fun work.


What would you say?


I’ve thought a bit about this topic lately, as I reflect on how I’ve changed from the person I was in my twenties to the person I’ve become in my thirties. Creativity has become more and more important to me, both at work and at play. And the lessons I’ve learned along the way (and the ones I’m still learning) seem like something 20-year-old me would have liked to know.



Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

You've probably learned a few things about creativity that your younger self could benefit from. Take these pieces of advice now.

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2discoverRecruitment's curator insight, September 9, 2014 9:52 PM

Spring is here! Time to think about new beginings..what area of your life would you like to be more creative with.....???

Susan Robin Sorrell's curator insight, September 11, 2014 11:30 AM

In my 20's I was just floundering around..trying to find my place in this world. I knew I wanted to create art, but had no direction. It has been a real journey to where I am now at 50.

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What Happens When You Put Aside Your Ego And Take Your Mentors' Advice

What Happens When You Put Aside Your Ego And Take Your Mentors' Advice | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

You are a twentysomething entrepreneur ready to launch a new business and your emotions are running wild. You're frightened, intimated, and stressed, but at the same time you're enthusiastic and confident about what the future holds.


At this point, it's time to step back and listen to those who have been in the same situation.


It would be a foolish mistake and a missed opportunity not to value the advice, experience, and knowledge a mentor can offer. Put your ego aside; be a sponge and soak up as much wisdom as possible.

I was in this exact position prior to launching SDC Nutrition Inc. I was confident and probably a little too self-assured, but I knew I had to set aside my ego to listen and absorb as much invaluable advice as possible from my advisers.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

As a eager entrepreneur it may be hard to heed someone else's advice. But being fearless means listening to people who are smarter than you.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, August 8, 2014 12:46 AM

Very good advice!

donhornsby's curator insight, August 8, 2014 8:58 AM

(From the article): Whether you're an established entrepreneur or fresh to the world of entrepreneurship, you should never hesitate to ask for advice from your mentors. Their expertise and perspective may be the knowledge needed to help you and your business succeed and prosper for many years to come.

victor carney's curator insight, August 11, 2014 1:52 PM

when you listen to somebody that knows more than you do you learn and grow into the best you can be 

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Why You Need a Business Coach

Why You Need a Business Coach | Business Brainpower with the Human Touch | Scoop.it

An outsider's perspective can be more valuable than you suspect.


Steve Jobs had Bill Campbell.

Jodie Foster leaned on Robert De Niro.

Andy Murray has Ivan Lendl.

High performers in any field typically have a coach or mentor. A great coach provides you with the benefit of their experience and asks more questions than they answer. They force you to think about your business in ways that you wouldn’t do on your own.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's insight:

The greats from all walks of life use a coach to get even better. But don’t obsess over finding a mentor from your own industry. Sometimes the very best coaches know nothing about your industry. It is their status as an outsider that makes their perspective so valuable.

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David Hain's curator insight, November 7, 2013 2:51 AM

Everyone needs a coach!