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Fresh Brewed Conservatism: This Finite Journey called "Life"

Fresh Brewed Conservatism: This Finite Journey called "Life" | Life and Music | Scoop.it
This Finite Journey called "#Life" http://t.co/Vg0VTiORzh #birds #bible #death
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Rescooped by Jean Summers from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Thirteen pointers for writing a memorable keynote speech

Thirteen pointers for writing a memorable keynote speech | Life and Music | Scoop.it

What is your best tip for writing a great, memorable keynote-type speech (think TED) that really moves the audience?


Via Charles Tiayon
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HOLIDAY SHOPPING: 7 fit gift ideas for college students - Heritage Newspapers

HOLIDAY SHOPPING: 7 fit gift ideas for college students - Heritage Newspapers | Life and Music | Scoop.it
Heritage Newspapers
HOLIDAY SHOPPING: 7 fit gift ideas for college students
Heritage Newspapers
Help your favorite students track their daily step-count with a pedometer. For a basic version, try the Omron HJ-203 ($20).
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Attachment Mummy: Our 'Storage Facility'

Attachment Mummy: Our 'Storage Facility' | Life and Music | Scoop.it
Jean Summers's insight:

Regular readers may well remember the on-going saga of our home re-organisation and general rejiggery.  Well we are almost all done now, thank goodness!  Although another trip to the storage facility otherwise known as my mum's house is due.  Yes, my poor mother has a spare bedroom with one wall clogged up by our stuff.  Luckily it's big room, and if you stand with your back to that wall it's just like our stuff's not even there - honest!


Read full story: http://www.attachmentmummy.com

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The Ups and Downs of Thespis | The Greenwich Phantom

The Ups and Downs of Thespis | The Greenwich Phantom | Life and Music | Scoop.it
Jean Summers's insight:

This morning got off to a really good start. A press release in my inbox cheered me right up and I was just about to do a jolly piece about it, when I came across this timely and worrying post by 853 Blog that talks of the iminent and very real threat to the Woolwich Grand theatre, next door to the town hall in Woolwich and the more distant but equally serious threat to Greenwich theatre. 


Read full story: http://www.thegreenwichphantom.co.uk/

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Rescooped by Jean Summers from Amazing Science
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Can Life Evolve from Wires and Plastic?

Can Life Evolve from Wires and Plastic? | Life and Music | Scoop.it

In a laboratory tucked away in a corner of the Cornell University campus, Hod Lipson’s robots are evolving. He has already produced a self-aware robot that is able to gather information about itself as it learns to walk.

 

Hod Lipson reports: "We wrote a trivial 10-line algorithm, ran it on big gaming simulator, put it in a big computer and waited a week. In the beginning we got piles of junk. Then we got beautiful machines. Crazy shapes. Eventually a motor connected to a wire, which caused the motor to vibrate. Then a vibrating piece of junk moved infinitely better than any other… eventually we got machines that crawl. The evolutionary algorithm came up with a design, blueprints that worked for the robot."

 

The computer-bound creature transferred from the virtual domain to our world by way of a 3D printer. And then it took its first steps. Was this arrangement of rods and wires the machine-world’s equivalent of the primordial cell? Not quite: Lipson’s robot still couldn’t operate without human intervention. ‘We had to snap in the battery,’ he told me, ‘but it was the first time evolution produced physical robots. Eventually, I want to print the wires, the batteries, everything. Then evolution will have so much freedom. Evolution will not be constrained.’

 

Not many people would call creatures bred of plastic, wires and metal beautiful. Yet to see them toddle deliberately across the laboratory floor, or bend and snap as they pick up blocks and build replicas of themselves, brings to mind the beauty of evolution and animated life.

 

One could imagine Lipson’s electronic menagerie lining the shelves at Toys R Us, if not the CIA, but they have a deeper purpose. Lipson hopes to illuminate evolution itself. Just recently, his team provided some insight into modularity—the curious phenomenon whereby biological systems are composed of discrete functional units.

 

Though inherently newsworthy, the fruits of the Creative Machines Lab are just small steps along the road towards new life. Lipson, however, maintains that some of his robots are alive in a rudimentary sense. ‘There is nothing more black or white than alive or dead,’ he said, ‘but beneath the surface it’s not simple. There is a lot of grey area in between.’

 

The robots of the Creative Machines Lab might fulfill many criteria for life, but they are not completely autonomous—not yet. They still require human handouts for replication and power. These, though, are just stumbling blocks, conditions that could be resolved some day soon—perhaps by way of a 3D printer, a ready supply of raw materials, and a human hand to flip the switch just the once.

 

According to Lipson, an evolvable system is ‘the ultimate artificial intelligence, the most hands-off AI there is, which means a double edge. All you feed it is power and computing power. It’s both scary and promising.’ What if the solution to some of our present problems requires the evolution of artificial intelligence beyond anything we can design ourselves? Could an evolvable program help to predict the emergence of new flu viruses? Could it create more efficient machines? And once a truly autonomous, evolvable robot emerges, how long before its descendants make a pilgrimage to Lipson’s lab, where their ancestor first emerged from a primordial soup of wires and plastic to take its first steps on Earth?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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It’s About Time: Changing Change Management

It’s About Time: Changing Change Management | Life and Music | Scoop.it

Major change is always risky, and those risks are not managed nearly as effectively as they could be. The failure rate of major change efforts remains stubbornly high. So what are the obstacles to effective change and what it takes to succeed?


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Jean Summers's insight:

let us just make sure there is no tremendous effects to affected people..

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Stay On The Train And Enjoy The Journey

Stay On The Train And Enjoy The Journey | Life and Music | Scoop.it
Why Change?
Change is a necessary part of life.
Our hair grows, our skin grows and is replaced, our fingernails grow out and need to be cut. The weather changes and most people will change jobs 7-10...
Jean Summers's insight:

Change is constant and "no resistance" should prevail..

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Rescooped by Jean Summers from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Thirteen pointers for writing a memorable keynote speech

Thirteen pointers for writing a memorable keynote speech | Life and Music | Scoop.it

What is your best tip for writing a great, memorable keynote-type speech (think TED) that really moves the audience?


Via Charles Tiayon
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Photos: Heritage University students help hungry families - Yakima Herald-Republic

Photos: Heritage University students help hungry families - Yakima Herald-Republic | Life and Music | Scoop.it
Photos: Heritage University students help hungry families
Yakima Herald-Republic
Students at Heritage University spent today packing food boxes for the less fortunate. Click to Watch Attached Video →.
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Richard Hawley - Coles Corner - Mercury Music Prize

I'm going down town where there's music, I'm going where voices fill the air... http://t.co/7jTS44ISYP
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How Music Affects the Brain

How Music Affects the Brain | Life and Music | Scoop.it
Thanks to smartphones, music marketplaces from iTunes and Amazon, and the popularity of apps such as Pandora and Spotify, it seems like everyone’s plugged... (http://t.co/PDMfEatHVx ....
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Guidelines for Writing a Masters Dissertation - Dissertation Help Steps

Do you need help with your dissertation? It is common for masters students to seek dissertation help especially if their prior project almost suffered a collapse. This might be
Jean Summers's insight:

students life...

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Rescooped by Jean Summers from LeadershipABC
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How LEGO Grew to Global Dominance

How LEGO Grew to Global Dominance | Life and Music | Scoop.it

LEGO toys have captivated children and their parents for 80 years. But managing the enterprise has not always been fun and games. Professor Stefan H. Thomke explains the lessons behind a new case on the company.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 18, 2013 11:51 AM

Harvard Business School Working Knowledge Case.