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Econophysics and Sociophysics (9783527406708): Bikas K. Chakrabarti, Anirban Chakraborti, Arnab Chatterjee: Books

Econophysics and Sociophysics [Bikas K. Chakrabarti, Anirban Chakraborti, Arnab Chatterjee] on Amazon.com.

Review"...The editors are to be commended for having drawn together a set of papers both representative and innovative in these two emerging transdisciplinary fields. This may be the best available volume for covering both so comprehensively." (JASSS, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, October 2007) From the Back CoverWith the intent of unifying the p physical, biological, economic and social sciences, complexity research has made considerable progress in recent years; in particular in the areas traditionally covered by economics or sociology. Econophysics and Sociophysics: Trends and Perspectives provides the reader with up-to-date reviews by leading experts in the respective fields, on major developments in the interdisciplinary areas of physics, economics and sociology. This is the first book providing a panoramic view of these developments in the last one and a half decades.

From the contents:

Understanding and Managing the Future Evolution of a Competitive Multi-Agent PopulationA Review of Empirical Studies and Methods of Income Distributions in SocietyComputer Simulation of Language Competition by PhysicistsSocial Opinion DynamicsHow a "Hit" is Born: The Emergence of Popularity from the Dynamics of Collective Choice
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Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos
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Percolation on Networks with Conditional Dependence Group

Percolation on Networks with Conditional Dependence Group | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it
Recently, the dependence group has been proposed to study the robustness of networks with interdependent nodes. A dependence group means that a failed node in the group can lead to the failures of the whole group. Considering the situation of real networks that one failed node may not always break the functionality of a dependence group, we study a cascading failure model that a dependence group fails only when more than a fraction β of nodes of the group fail. We find that the network becomes more robust with the increasing of the parameter β. However, the type of percolation transition is always first order unless the model reduces to the classical network percolation model, which is independent of the degree distribution of the network. Furthermore, we find that a larger dependence group size does not always make the networks more fragile. We also present exact solutions to the size of the giant component and the critical point, which are in agreement with the simulations well.

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“Waiting for Carnot”: Information and complexity

The relationship between information and complexity is analyzed using a detailed literature analysis. Complexity is a multifaceted concept, with no single agreed definition. There are numerous approaches to defining and measuring complexity and organization, all involving the idea of information. Conceptions of complexity, order, organization, and “interesting order” are inextricably intertwined with those of information. Shannon's formalism captures information's unpredictable creative contributions to organized complexity; a full understanding of information's relation to structure and order is still lacking. Conceptual investigations of this topic should enrich the theoretical basis of the information science discipline, and create fruitful links with other disciplines that study the concepts of information and complexity.

 

“Waiting for Carnot”: Information and complexity
David Bawden and Lyn Robinson

Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Early View

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.23535


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On the tail risk of violent conflict and its underestimation

We examine all possible statistical pictures of violent conflicts over common era history with a focus on dealing with incompleteness and unreliability of data. We apply methods from extreme value theory on log-transformed data to remove compact support, then, owing to the boundedness of maximum casualties, retransform the data and derive expected means. We find the estimated mean likely to be at least three times larger than the sample mean, meaning severe underestimation of the severity of conflicts from naive observation. We check for robustness by sampling between high and low estimates and jackknifing the data. We study inter-arrival times between tail events and find (first-order) memorylessless of events. The statistical pictures obtained are at variance with the claims about "long peace".

 

On the tail risk of violent conflict and its underestimation
Pasquale Cirillo, Nassim Nicholas Taleb

http://arxiv.org/abs/1505.04722


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The Effect of Incentives and Meta-incentives on the Evolution of Cooperation

The Effect of Incentives and Meta-incentives on the Evolution of Cooperation | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it
Although positive incentives for cooperators and/or negative incentives for free-riders in social dilemmas play an important role in maintaining cooperation, there is still the outstanding issue of who should pay the cost of incentives. The second-order free-rider problem, in which players who do not provide the incentives dominate in a game, is a well-known academic challenge. In order to meet this challenge, we devise and analyze a meta-incentive game that integrates positive incentives (rewards) and negative incentives (punishments) with second-order incentives, which are incentives for other players’ incentives. The critical assumption of our model is that players who tend to provide incentives to other players for their cooperative or non-cooperative behavior also tend to provide incentives to their incentive behaviors. In this paper, we solve the replicator dynamics for a simple version of the game and analytically categorize the game types into four groups. We find that the second-order free-rider problem is completely resolved without any third-order or higher (meta) incentive under the assumption. To do so, a second-order costly incentive, which is given individually (peer-to-peer) after playing donation games, is needed. The paper concludes that (1) second-order incentives for first-order reward are necessary for cooperative regimes, (2) a system without first-order rewards cannot maintain a cooperative regime, (3) a system with first-order rewards and no incentives for rewards is the worst because it never reaches cooperation, and (4) a system with rewards for incentives is more likely to be a cooperative regime than a system with punishments for incentives when the cost-effect ratio of incentives is sufficiently large. This solution is general and strong in the sense that the game does not need any centralized institution or proactive system for incentives.

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Twitter-based analysis of the dynamics of collective attention to political parties

Large-scale data from social media have a significant potential to describe complex phenomena in real world and to anticipate collective behaviors such as information spreading and social trends. One specific case of study is represented by the collective attention to the action of political parties. Not surprisingly, researchers and stakeholders tried to correlate parties' presence on social media with their performances in elections. Despite the many efforts, results are still inconclusive since this kind of data is often very noisy and significant signals could be covered by (largely unknown) statistical fluctuations.
In this paper we consider the number of tweets (tweet volume) of a party as a proxy of collective attention to the party, we identify the dynamics of the volume, and show that this quantity has some information on the elections outcome. We find that the distribution of the tweet volume for each party follows a log-normal distribution with a positive autocorrelation over short terms. Furthermore, by measuring the ratio of two consecutive daily tweet volumes, we find that the evolution of the daily volume of a party can be described by means of a geometric Brownian motion. Finally, we determine the optimal period of averaging tweet volume for reducing fluctuations and extracting short-term tendencies. We conclude that the tweet volume is a good indicator of parties' success in the elections when considered over an optimal time window. Our study identifies the statistical nature of collective attention to political issues and sheds light on how to model the dynamics of collective attention in social media.

 

Twitter-based analysis of the dynamics of collective attention to political parties
Young-Ho Eom, Michelangelo Puliga, Jasmina Smailović, Igor Mozetič, Guido Caldarelli

http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.06861


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Thermodynamics of firms' growth

The distribution of firms' growth and firms' sizes is a topic under intense scrutiny. In this paper we show that a thermodynamic model based on the Maximum Entropy Principle, with dynamical prior information, can be constructed that adequately describes the dynamics and distribution of firms' growth. Our theoretical framework is tested against a comprehensive data-base of Spanish firms, which covers to a very large extent Spain's economic activity with a total of 1,155,142 firms evolving along a full decade. We show that the empirical exponent of Pareto's law, a rule often observed in the rank distribution of large-size firms, is explained by the capacity of the economic system for creating/destroying firms, and can be used to measure the health of a capitalist-based economy. Indeed, our model predicts that when the exponent is larger that 1, creation of firms is favored; when it is smaller that 1, destruction of firms is favored instead; and when it equals 1 (matching Zipf's law), the system is in a full macroeconomic equilibrium, entailing "free" creation and/or destruction of firms. For medium and smaller firm-sizes, the dynamical regime changes; the whole distribution can no longer be fitted to a single simple analytic form and numerical prediction is required. Our model constitutes the basis of a full predictive framework for the economic evolution of an ensemble of firms that can be potentially used to develop simulations and test hypothetical scenarios, as economic crisis or the response to specific policy measures.

 

Thermodynamics of firms' growth
Eduardo Zambrano, Alberto Hernando, Aurelio Fernandez-Bariviera, Ricardo Hernando, Angelo Plastino

http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.07666


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Using Mobile Phone Data for Electricity Infrastructure Planning

Detailed knowledge of the energy needs at relatively high spatial and temporal resolution is crucial for the electricity infrastructure planning of a region. However, such information is typically limited by the scarcity of data on human activities, in particular in developing countries where electrification of rural areas is sought. The analysis of society-wide mobile phone records has recently proven to offer unprecedented insights into the spatio-temporal distribution of people, but this information has never been used to support electrification planning strategies anywhere and for rural areas in developing countries in particular. The aim of this project is the assessment of the contribution of mobile phone data for the development of bottom-up energy demand models, in order to enhance energy planning studies and existing electrification practices. More specifically, this work introduces a framework that combines mobile phone data analysis, socioeconomic and geo-referenced data analysis, and state-of-the-art energy infrastructure engineering techniques to assess the techno-economic feasibility of different centralized and decentralized electrification options for rural areas in a developing country. Specific electrification options considered include extensions of the existing medium voltage (MV) grid, diesel engine-based community-level Microgrids, and individual household-level solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The framework and relevant methodology are demonstrated throughout the paper using the case of Senegal and the mobile phone data made available for the 'D4D-Senegal' innovation challenge. The results are extremely encouraging and highlight the potential of mobile phone data to support more efficient and economically attractive electrification plans.

 

Using Mobile Phone Data for Electricity Infrastructure Planning
Eduardo Alejandro Martinez-Cesena, Pierluigi Mancarella, Mamadou Ndiaye, Markus Schläpfer

http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.03899


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Complexity Digest's curator insight, April 15, 9:36 PM

This work won the First Prize of the Data for Development Challenge http://www.d4d.orange.com/ ;

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Complexity and the Arrow of Time: Charles H. Lineweaver, Paul C. W. Davies, Michael Ruse: 9781107027251: Amazon.com: Books

Complexity and the Arrow of Time

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Complexity and the Arrow of Time [Charles H. Lineweaver, Paul C. W. Davies, Michael Ruse] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. There is a widespread assumption that the universe in general, and life in particular, is 'getting more complex with time'. This book brings together a wide range of experts in science
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Self-Policing Through Norm Internalization

In the seminal work 'An Evolutionary Approach to Norms', Axelrod identified internalization as one of the key mechanisms that supports the spreading and stabilization of norms. But how does this process work? This paper advocates a rich cognitive model of different types, degrees and factors of norm internalization. Rather than a none-or-all phenomenon, we claim that norm internalization is a dynamic process, whose deepest step occurs when norms are complied with thoughtlessly. In order to implement a theoretical model of internalization and check its effectiveness in sustaining social norms and promoting cooperation, a simulated web-service distributed market has been designed, where both services and agents' tasks are dynamically assigned. Internalizers are compared with agents whose behaviour is driven only by self-interested motivations. Simulation findings show that in dynamic unpredictable scenarios, internalizers prove more adaptive and achieve higher level of cooperation than agents whose decision-making is based only on utility calculation.

 

Self-Policing Through Norm Internalization: A Cognitive Solution to the Tragedy of the Digital Commons in Social Networks
by Daniel Villatoro, Giulia Andrighetto, Rosaria Conte and Jordi Sabater-Mir
http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/18/2/2.html


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Mark Waser's curator insight, April 2, 10:40 AM

Axelrod, Tragedy of the Digital Commons & Optimality of internalizers/altruists/deontologists over utility calculators.  What more could you want?

Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, April 2, 5:42 PM

To finish reading...

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Modelling Academics as Agents

Modelling Academics as Agents | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it

The rapid changes occurring in the higher education domain are placing increasing pressure on the actors in this space to focus efforts on identifying and adopting strategies for success. One particular group of interest are academics or scientists, and the ways that these individuals, or collectives as institutional or discipline-based science systems, make decisions about how best to achieve success in their chosen field. The agent-based model and simulation that we present draws on the hypothetical "strategic publication model" proposed by Mölders, Fink and Weyer (2011), and extends this work by defining experimental settings to implement a prototype ABMS in NetLogo. While considerable work remains to fully resolve theoretical issues relating to the scope, calibration and validation of the model, this work goes some way toward resolving some of the details associated with defining appropriate experimental settings. Also presented are the results of four experiments that focus on exploring the emergent effects of the system that result from varying the strategic mix of actors in the system.


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Fill in the Gap. A New Alliance for Social and Natural Sciences

In the last few years, electronic media brought a revolution in the traceability of social phenomena. As particles in a bubble chamber, social trajectories leave digital trails that can be analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of collective life. To make sense of these traces a renewed collaboration between social and natural scientists is needed. In this paper, we claim that current research strategies based on micro-macro models are unfit to unfold the complexity of collective existence and that the priority should instead be the development of new formal tools to exploit the richness of digital data.

 

Fill in the Gap: A New Alliance for Social and Natural Sciences
by Tommaso Venturini, Pablo Jensen and Bruno Latour
http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/18/2/11.html


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A Course on Cooperative Game Theory (by Satya R. Chakravarty et al.)

A Course on Cooperative Game Theory

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Cooperative game theory deals with situations where objectives of participants of the game are partially cooperative and partially conflicting. It is in the interest of participants to cooperate in the sense of making binding agreements to achieve the maximum possible benefit. When it comes to distribution of benefit/payoffs, participants have conflicting interests. Such situations are usually modelled as cooperative games. While the book mainly discusses transferable utility games, there is also a brief analysis of non-transferable utility games. Alternative solution concepts to cooperative game theoretic problems are presented in chapters 1-9 and the next four chapters present issues related to computations of solutions discussed in the earlier chapters. The proofs of all results presented in the book are quite explicit. Additionally the mathematical techniques employed in demonstrating the results will be helpful to those who wish to learn application of mathematics for solving problems in game theory.

 

 


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The spontaneous emergence of conventions: An experimental study of cultural evolution

The spontaneous emergence of conventions: An experimental study of cultural evolution | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it
How do shared conventions emerge in complex decentralized social systems? This question engages fields as diverse as linguistics, sociology, and cognitive science. Previous empirical attempts to solve this puzzle all presuppose that formal or informal institutions, such as incentives for global agreement, coordinated leadership, or aggregated information about the population, are needed to facilitate a solution. Evolutionary theories of social conventions, by contrast, hypothesize that such institutions are not necessary in order for social conventions to form. However, empirical tests of this hypothesis have been hindered by the difficulties of evaluating the real-time creation of new collective behaviors in large decentralized populations. Here, we present experimental results—replicated at several scales—that demonstrate the spontaneous creation of universally adopted social conventions and show how simple changes in a population’s network structure can direct the dynamics of norm formation, driving human populations with no ambition for large scale coordination to rapidly evolve shared social conventions.

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[1505.05738] Predictability of Critical Transitions

[1505.05738] Predictability of Critical Transitions | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it

Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socio-economic changes and climate transitions between ice-ages and warm-ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However especially in the presence of noise it is not clear, whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model, under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.


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Evolutionary Dynamics for Persistent Cooperation in Structured Populations

The emergence and maintenance of cooperative behavior is a fascinating topic in evolutionary biology and social science. The public goods game (PGG) is a paradigm for exploring cooperative behavior. In PGG, the total resulting payoff is divided equally among all participants. This feature still leads to the dominance of defection without substantially magnifying the public good by a multiplying factor. Much effort has been made to explain the evolution of cooperative strategies, including a recent model in which only a portion of the total benefit is shared by all the players through introducing a new strategy named persistent cooperation. A persistent cooperator is a contributor who is willing to pay a second cost to retrieve the remaining portion of the payoff contributed by themselves. In a previous study, this model was analyzed in the framework of well-mixed populations. This paper focuses on discussing the persistent cooperation in lattice-structured populations. The evolutionary dynamics of the structured populations consisting of three types of competing players (pure cooperators, defectors and persistent cooperators) are revealed by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. In particular, the approximate expressions of fixation probabilities for strategies are derived on one-dimensional lattices. The phase diagrams of stationary states, the evolution of frequencies and spatial patterns for strategies are illustrated on both one-dimensional and square lattices by simulations. Our results are consistent with the general observation that, at least in most situations, a structured population facilitates the evolution of cooperation. Specifically, here we find that the existence of persistent cooperators greatly suppresses the spreading of defectors under more relaxed conditions in structured populations compared to that obtained in well-mixed population.

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Multifractal to monofractal evolution of the London's street network

We perform a multifractal analysis of the evolution of London's street network from 1786 to 2010. First, we show that a single fractal dimension, commonly associated with the morphological description of cities, does not su ce to capture the dynamics of the system. Instead, for a proper characterization of such a dynamics, the multifractal spectrum needs to be considered. Our analysis reveals that London evolves from an inhomogeneous fractal structure, that can be described in terms of a multifractal, to a homogeneous one, that converges to monofractality. We argue that London's multifractal to monofracal evolution might be a special outcome of the constraint imposed on its growth by a green belt. Through a series of simulations, we show that multifractal objects, constructed through di usion limited aggregation, evolve towards monofractality if their growth is constrained by a non-permeable boundary.

 

Multifractal to monofractal evolution of the London's street network
Roberto Murcio, A. Paolo Masucci, Elsa Arcaute, Michael Batty

http://arxiv.org/abs/1505.02760


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La thermodynamique des transitions économiques - François Roddier - YouTube

Conférence donnée à aux Ateliers du think-tank The Shift Project le 12 mars 2015, par François Roddier, astrophysicien. LA THERMODYNAMIQUE DES TRANSITIONS ÉC...

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Hierarchical organisation of Britain through percolation theory

Urban systems present hierarchical structures at many different scales. These are observed as administrative regional delimitations, which are the outcome of geographical, political and historical constraints. Using percolation theory on the street intersections and on the road network of Britain, we obtain hierarchies at different scales that are independent of administrative arrangements. Natural boundaries, such as islands and National Parks, consistently emerge at the largest/regional scales. Cities are devised through recursive percolations on each of the emerging clusters, but the system does not undergo a phase transition at the distance threshold at which cities can be defined. This specific distance is obtained by computing the fractal dimension of the clusters extracted at each distance threshold. We observe that the fractal dimension presents a maximum over all the different distance thresholds. The clusters obtained at this maximum are in very good correspondence to the morphological definition of cities given by satellite images, and by other methods previously developed by the authors (Arcaute et al. 2015).

 

Hierarchical organisation of Britain through percolation theory
Elsa Arcaute, Carlos Molinero, Erez Hatna, Roberto Murcio, Camilo Vargas-Ruiz, Paolo Masucci, Jiaqiu Wang, Michael Batty

http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.08318


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Computational Models of Consumer Confidence from Large-Scale Online Attention Data: Crowd-Sourcing Econometrics

Economies are instances of complex socio-technical systems that are shaped by the interactions of large numbers of individuals. The individual behavior and decision-making of consumer agents is determined by complex psychological dynamics that include their own assessment of present and future economic conditions as well as those of others, potentially leading to feedback loops that affect the macroscopic state of the economic system. We propose that the large-scale interactions of a nation's citizens with its online resources can reveal the complex dynamics of their collective psychology, including their assessment of future system states. Here we introduce a behavioral index of Chinese Consumer Confidence (C3I) that computationally relates large-scale online search behavior recorded by Google Trends data to the macroscopic variable of consumer confidence. Our results indicate that such computational indices may reveal the components and complex dynamics of consumer psychology as a collective socio-economic phenomenon, potentially leading to improved and more refined economic forecasting.

 

Dong X, Bollen J (2015) Computational Models of Consumer Confidence from Large-Scale Online Attention Data: Crowd-Sourcing Econometrics. PLoS ONE 10(3): e0120039. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120039 ;


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25 Years of Self-Organized Criticality: Concepts and Controversies

Introduced by the late Per Bak and his colleagues, self-organized criticality (SOC) has been one of the most stimulating concepts to come out of statistical mechanics and condensed matter theory in the last few decades, and has played a significant role in the development of complexity science. SOC, and more generally fractals and power laws, have attacted much comment, ranging from the very positive to the polemical. The other papers in this special issue (Aschwanden et al, 2014; McAteer et al, 2014; Sharma et al, 2015) showcase the considerable body of observations in solar, magnetospheric and fusion plasma inspired by the SOC idea, and expose the fertile role the new paradigm has played in approaches to modeling and understanding multiscale plasma instabilities. This very broad impact, and the necessary process of adapting a scientific hypothesis to the conditions of a given physical system, has meant that SOC as studied in these fields has sometimes differed significantly from the definition originally given by its creators. In Bak's own field of theoretical physics there are significant observational and theoretical open questions, even 25 years on (Pruessner, 2012). One aim of the present review is to address the dichotomy between the great reception SOC has received in some areas, and its shortcomings, as they became manifest in the controversies it triggered. Our article tries to clear up what we think are misunderstandings of SOC in fields more remote from its origins in statistical mechanics, condensed matter and dynamical systems by revisiting Bak, Tang and Wiesenfeld's original papers.

 

25 Years of Self-Organized Criticality: Concepts and Controversies
Nicholas Watkins, Gunnar Pruessner, Sandra Chapman, Norma Bock Crosby, Henrik Jensen

http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.04991


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Assembling thefacebook: Using heterogeneity to understand online social network assembly

Online social networks represent a popular and highly diverse class of social media systems. Despite this variety, each of these systems undergoes a general process of online social network assembly, which represents the complicated and heterogeneous changes that transform newly born systems into mature platforms. However, little is known about this process. For example, how much of a network's assembly is driven by simple growth? How does a network's structure change as it matures? How does network structure vary with adoption rates and user heterogeneity, and do these properties play different roles at different points in the assembly? We investigate these and other questions using a unique dataset of online connections among the roughly one million users at the first 100 colleges admitted to Facebook, captured just 20 months after its launch. We first show that different vintages and adoption rates across this population of networks reveal temporal dynamics of the assembly process, and that assembly is only loosely related to network growth. We then exploit natural experiments embedded in this dataset and complementary data obtained via Internet archaeology to show that different subnetworks, e.g., among students and among alumni, matured at different rates toward similar end states. These results shed new light on the processes and patterns of online social network assembly, and may facilitate more effective design for online social systems.

 

Assembling thefacebook: Using heterogeneity to understand online social network assembly
Abigail Z. Jacobs, Samuel F. Way, Johan Ugander, Aaron Clauset

http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.06772


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Tom cockburn's curator insight, April 16, 4:05 AM

A useful investigation albeit in a  particular though diverse segment of people at colleges.

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How Evolutionary Dynamics Affects Network Reciprocity in Prisoner's Dilemma

How Evolutionary Dynamics Affects Network Reciprocity in Prisoner's Dilemma | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it

Cooperation lies at the foundations of human societies, yet why people cooperate remains a conundrum. The issue, known as network reciprocity, of whether population structure can foster cooperative behavior in social dilemmas has been addressed by many, but theoretical studies have yielded contradictory results so far—as the problem is very sensitive to how players adapt their strategy. However, recent experiments with the prisoner's dilemma game played on different networks and in a specific range of payoffs suggest that humans, at least for those experimental setups, do not consider neighbors' payoffs when making their decisions, and that the network structure does not influence the final outcome. In this work we carry out an extensive analysis of different evolutionary dynamics, taking into account most of the alternatives that have been proposed so far to implement players' strategy updating process. In this manner we show that the absence of network reciprocity is a general feature of the dynamics (among those we consider) that do not take neighbors' payoffs into account. Our results, together with experimental evidence, hint at how to properly model real people's behavior.


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The Amazing, Autotuning Sandpile

The Amazing, Autotuning Sandpile | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it

Remember domino theory? One country going Communist was supposed to topple the next, and then the next, and the next. The metaphor drove much of United States foreign policy in the middle of the 20th century. But it had the wrong name. From a physical point of view, it should have been called the “sandpile theory.”
Real-world political phase transitions tend to happen not in neat sequences, but in sudden coordinated fits, like the Arab Spring, or the collapse of the Eastern Bloc. These reflect quiet periods punctuated by crises—like a sandpile. You can add grains of sand to the top of a sandpile for a while, to no apparent effect. Then, all at once, an avalanche sweeps sand down from the top in an irregular pattern, possibly setting off little sub-avalanches as it goes.

 

http://nautil.us/issue/23/dominoes/the-amazing-autotuning-sandpile ;


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Responding to Complexity in Socio-­Economic Systems: How to Build a Smart and Resilient Society?

The world is changing at an ever-increasing pace. And it has changed in a much more fundamental way than one would think, primarily because it has become more connected and interdependent than in our entire history. Every new product, every new invention can be combined with those that existed before, thereby creating an explosion of complexity: structural complexity, dynamic complexity, functional complexity, and algorithmic complexity. How to respond to this challenge?

 

Responding to Complexity in Socio-­Economic Systems: How to Build a Smart and Resilient Society?

Dirk Helbing

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2583391


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Advances in Artificial Economics

Advances in Artificial Economics | Libros y Papers sobre  Complejidad - Sistemas Complejos | Scoop.it

The interactions between Computer Science and the Social Sciences have grown fruitfully along the past 20 years. The mutual benefits of such a cross-fertilization stand as well at a conceptual, technological or methodological level. Economics in particular benefited from innovations in multi-agent systems in Computer Science leading to agent-based computational economics and in return the multi-agent systems benefited for instance of economic researches related to mechanisms of incentives and regulation to design self-organized systems. Created 10 years ago, in 2005 in Lille (France) by Philippe Matthieu and his team, the Artificial Economics conference series reveals the liveliness of the collaborations and exchanges among computer scientists and economists in particular. The excellent quality of this conference has been recognized since its inception and its proceedings have been regularly published in Springer’s Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems series. At about the same period, the European Social Simulation Association was created and decided to support an annual conference dedicated to computational approaches of the social sciences. Both communities kept going alongside for the past ten years presenting evident overlaps concerning either their approaches or their members. This year, both conferences have decided to join their efforts and hold a common conference, Social Simulation Conference, in Barcelona, Spain, 1st to 5th September 2014 which will host the 10th edition of the Artificial Economics Conference. In this edition, 32 submissions from 11 countries were received, from which we selected 20 for presentation (near 60 % acceptance). The papers have then been revised and extended and 19 papers were selected in order to make part of this volume.


Via Jorge Louçã, NESS
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