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A Digital Library for Everyone | American Libraries Magazine

A Digital Library for Everyone | American Libraries Magazine | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

It’s this photo—and others like it—that got Maura Marx into a bit of trouble. Marx is director of the effort to launch the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), and the photos are part of its first exhibitions about emigrants leaving Europe to come to America.When DPLA launches April 18, it will already contain hundreds of collections from around the country, from daguerreotypes of African slaves to medieval manuscripts, from 19th-century newspapers from small-town Kentucky to newsreel footage from much of the past century.

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Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
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Do Libraries Need Ebooks? - Digital Book World

Do Libraries Need Ebooks? - Digital Book World | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
At the American Library Association’s mid-winter meeting in Seattle last week, discussion swirled around libraries and ebooks – as it has in the library community for several years now.
 
Access to ebooks for patrons is still a high priority and librarians are “frustrated with the pace of change,” according to Sari Feldman, executive director of the Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Public Library and co-chair of ALA’s Digital Content & Libraries Working Group. Librarians are also unhappy with library ebook licenses that are limiting or when ebooks are more expensive for libraries to purchase and the “ALA anticipates that continued, or stepped up, advocacy will be necessary in 2013.” So look forward to that.
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Jane Cowell's curator insight, February 18, 11:41 PM
Digital requires libraries to rethink delivery - radical collaboration between libraries needed
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The (Nearly) Perfect Training Room

The (Nearly) Perfect Training Room | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Training Rooms in Libraries

Library space, where librarians teach information literacy, should not look like an old-fashioned classroom or a computerized training room which might be found in a computer centre. In a traditional information technology training room or a computer laboratory.  The furniture and its arrangement convey messages to occupants: don’t move, don’t discuss, don’t feel comfortable! Tables are usually placed in rows. There are rarely windows that allow views of the outside world. The computers and large monitors dominate, there might be some digitized displays – but there is limited space for the learners. The students using the facility will become tired very quickly. The following images of traditional training rooms typify the stereotyped and stultifying atmosphere which develops, even if the colours are bright.
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Before Amazon, We Had Bookmobiles: 15+ Rare Photos Of Libraries-On-Wheels

Before Amazon, We Had Bookmobiles: 15+ Rare Photos Of Libraries-On-Wheels | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Long before Amazon, Audible, and other digital book distributors, bookmobiles were bringing literature to peoples' doorsteps. Their mission was to provide the
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Ukraine publishers speak out against ban on Russian books

Ukraine publishers speak out against ban on Russian books | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Ukrainian publishers have reacted angrily to their government’s ban on importing books from Russia, claiming it will create a black market and damage the domestic industry.

The ban, passed by Ukraine’s parliament, is the latest front in the battle between Kiev and Moscow that has been running since Russia annexed Crimea and pro-Russian forces seized power in parts of eastern Ukraine in 2014. Books from Russia account for up to 60% of all titles sold in Ukraine and are estimated to make up 100,000 sales a year.

Although the ban has been under discussion since September, its sudden implementation caught booksellers and publishers by surprise. Speaking to Eugene Gerden of the Publishing Perspectives website, Alexander Afonin of the Ukrainian Association of Publishers and Booksellers warned the move would lead to a shortage of books and force Russian titles underground. He predicted that the ban would last until 1 April at least.

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Amazon to Open Bookstore in San Francisco Suburb, Unstore in Cleveland | The Digital Reader

Amazon to Open Bookstore in San Francisco Suburb, Unstore in Cleveland | The Digital Reader | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

There's no mention on Amazon's website but it seems the retailer is planning to open its next Amazon Books location in Walnut Creek, Calif.:

Following the departure of Barnes & Noble last year and the demise of several chain and independent bookstores in the city over the decades, online giant Amazon is planning a brick-and-mortar book store in Broadway Plaza.

Amazon spokeswoman Sarah Gelman confirmed the Seattle-based online retailer is opening an Amazon Books and hiring workers at the high-end shopping center.

Whatever the final incarnation, Amazon’s foray into tony Walnut Creek doesn’t shock Laurelle Swan, who operates the city’s last remaining independently-owned book store, Swan’s Fine Books.

“I’m not surprised Amazon came in because they saw a need here for new books,” she said.

Despite its booming retail, dining and arts scene and its state-of-the-art public library, the city lacks a book store where shoppers can browse the shelves for the latest bestseller or newest cook book. The nearest general interest bookstores are in Concord, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda and San Ramon.
This will be the 9th Amazon Books location.

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Not so long ago the end of the physical book and bookstore were predicted. This had a great impact on libraries all over the world (closing and budget cuts). Now the opposite is happening.
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A Love Letter to My Library — Library Lover's Day

A Love Letter to My Library — Library Lover's Day | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Valentine's Day isn't the only thing happening on February 14—it's also a day to pay some respect to your local library by celebrating Library Lover's Day. We don't observe every random holiday around here, but libraries are definitely worthy of our affection.
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How “Sensitivity Readers” From Minority Groups Are Changing the Book Publishing Ecosystem

How “Sensitivity Readers” From Minority Groups Are Changing the Book Publishing Ecosystem | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

When Becky Albertalli published her first young adult novel, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, with the HarperCollins imprint Balzer and Bray in 2015, she never expected it to be controversial. She’d worked for years as a clinical psychologist specializing in gender nonconforming children and LGBTQ teens and adults.* Yet her book—about a closeted gay kid whose love notes to a classmate fall into the wrong hands—contained a moment that rubbed readers the wrong way: Simon, the sweet but clueless protagonist, muses that girls have an easier time coming out than boys, because their lesbianism strikes others as alluring. At a book signing, several people approached Albertalli to complain that the scene played too readily into a narrative they’d heard many times before. Online, commenters condemned the “fetishization of queer girls” in the book as “offensive.” Albertalli hadn’t originally given the passage a second thought: the character was obviously unworldly; elsewhere, he asserts that all Jews come from Israel. But in the latter exchange, readers pointed out, Simon’s Jewish friend immediately corrects him. The lesbian line, a snippet from the narrator’s interior monologue, receives no such rebuttal.

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New York City is creating America's biggest book club by picking one book for everyone to read

New York City is creating America's biggest book club by picking one book for everyone to read | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

New York City has launched a new program called “One Book, One New York” to encourage all city residents to read the same book.

The initiative allows New Yorkers in all five boroughs to vote on one of five books to start reading in the month of March. Residents can vote online or in kiosks in subway stations until February 28.

The effort is an attempt to give small bookstores throughout the city a boost and, as the program’s title suggests, create a sense of community among the city’s readers.

Other cities such as Chicago and Philadelphia have hosted community reads in the past, though none have created as large a book club as New York can.

In partnership with Buzzfeed, the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment turned to those other cities to suggest books for people to read. It also consulted with heads of local libraries, publishers, and academics, the New York Times reports.

The shortlist offers five choices: “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Sellout” by Paul Beatty, “Americanah” by Chimamanda Ngozi-Adichie, “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith, and “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” by Junot Diaz

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
In The netherlands the whole country and all libraries are engaged in all reading one book. It's known as "Nederland leest" (The Netherlands is reading)
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Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC

Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
World Architecture Community News - Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC
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Ambitious library to carry capital's literary ambitions

Ambitious library to carry capital's literary ambitions | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Businessman Boonchai Cheauchanwong was more than happy to hear that the "Bangkok City Library" will be opening in March, two months ahead of schedule.

"I am looking forward to the modern public library. It will help children learn, and benefit our entire city," Mr Boonchai, 49, said.

He added that the facility is essential to improving Thais' quality of life and their access to knowledge and learning.

"Access to facilities including a public library is one of the basic rights city residents deserve, courtesy of the government," he said.

Mr Boonchai was talking about a project by the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) to convert an old building at Kok Wua intersection into a new city library.

The project is part of a campaign to promote the capital as a "City of Learning", which aims to promote a culture of reading
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Free Books Alert: Bookzz

Free Books Alert: Bookzz | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
I’m thrilled to share that Ari Sigal has joined the NSR team to draw our attention to free content and free books online. Ari and I collaborated on many library and publishing projects together and our story began 15 years ago when I was still Book Review editor at Library Journal (he reviewed books for LJ under my guidance). Ari shares my passion for free access to knowledge beyond institutions, zip codes, and library cards (and he is a librarian, so his support is extra special). I thank him for agreeing to come on board and enlighten our readers about the wealth of good free content online available for discovery. I look forward to his tour of free books in digital format every Friday and learning from his evalutions. As I am discovering every day, there is much more out there to take note of than we may realize.—Mirela Roncevic, NSR Editorial Director
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100-year overdue book returned to San Francisco library

100-year overdue book returned to San Francisco library | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The San Francisco Public Library just had a book turned in that was 100 years overdue.
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Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary, eMuseum and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Saturday, January 14 | The Digital Reader

Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary, eMuseum and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Saturday, January 14 | The Digital Reader | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Editor's Note: The following is a compilation of tweets from @PaulKBiba, the former editor of Teleread.
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Libraries are Forever: E-Books & Print Books Can Coexist [Infographic] | Daily Infographic

Libraries are Forever: E-Books & Print Books Can Coexist [Infographic] | Daily Infographic | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
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Library of Congress Card Catalog

Library of Congress Card Catalog | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

For decades, an elegant card catalog occupied a central spot in the Library of Congress Main Reading Room. Before computerization, it was as central to the research process as a search engine in the present day.

When the Main Reading Room was closed for renovation in 1987 the Library returned the room to its original form with desks in a full circle. This meant moving the card catalog to desks adjacent to the Main Reading Room on the first floor of the Jefferson Building. No cards have been added since 1980, but the catalog is still used by researchers and librarians.

The Library of Congress card catalog system dates back to 1898. By 1901 the LC Card Division was producing vast quantities of them for sale to libraries across the country. Every book in the collection had a standardized card listing, relevant metadata, and cross-referenced topics.

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The Most Exciting Medical Technologies of 2017 - The Medical Futurist

The Most Exciting Medical Technologies of 2017 - The Medical Futurist | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

2016 was a rich year for medical technology. Virtual Reality. Augmented Reality. Smart algorithms analysing wearable data. Amazing technologies arrived in our lives and on the market almost every day. And it will not stop in the coming year.

The role of a futurist is certainly not making bold predictions about the future. No such big bet has taken humanity forward. Instead, our job is constantly analysing the trends shaping the future and trying to build bridges between them and what we have today. Still, people expect me to come up with predictions about medical technologies every year, and thus here they are.

The top technologies with the biggest promise for 2017

1) A new era in diabetes care
2) Precision medicine in oncology
3) Narrow artificial intelligence in US clinics
4) Driverless trucks or cars will include health sensors
5) New service in nutrigenomics
6) SpaceX and NASA will realize they need a digital health masterplan to reach Mars
7) The genome editing method CRISPR in clinical trials
8) A big tech company will step into health

and more

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Milner Library Is Digitizing the Colorful History of the Circus

Milner Library Is Digitizing the Colorful History of the Circus | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

This May, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will be ending their 146-year run with one final show at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on Long Island. As the famous circus company shutters its traveling doors (a result of high costs and dipping ticket sales), Illinois State University’s Milner Library is working to preserve the industry's unique culture. The library has spent years protecting circus history by digitizing thousands of posters, photographs, and Kodachrome slides. After receiving a $268,000 grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources, the library can now expand their online collection by digitizing over 300 circus route books spanning from 1842 to 1969. The project, which will take about three years, will help preserve the legacy of the circus for generations to come

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Ukrainian librarian under house arrest takes case to court of human rights

Ukrainian librarian under house arrest takes case to court of human rights | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Natalya Sharina, a Ukrainian librarian held under house arrest in Russia since October 2015, has taken her case to the European court of human rights in Strasbourg. Since her arrest in 2015, the Russian authorities have extended the order for Sharina, director of the Ukrainian Literature Library in Moscow, to be detained at home repeatedly, despite calls for her release.

In a move roundly condemned by human rights groups, Sharina went on trial in November 2016 for incitement by stocking books banned in Russia and labelled extremist and “anti-Russian propaganda”. Three weeks after the trial began, embezzlement was added to the list of charges. If found guilty, she faces up to 10 years in prison.

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Tiny Street Libraries Are Popping Up All Over South Australia | Glam Adelaide

Tiny Street Libraries Are Popping Up All Over South Australia | Glam Adelaide | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Over the last few years, there’s been a quiet phenomenon gaining momentum around the globe. Across Europe, the US and now Australia, tiny little libraries have been popping up on suburban streets, in regional areas, and in parks and playgrounds, to encourage literacy and a love of books in areas without traditional libraries. This week’s viral ABC News video profiling the growing trend in Australia, had us wondering – has South Australia been involved with this and we just didn’t know about it? Turns out it has. There’s well over a dozen little libraries across Adelaide and the State, bringing both kids and adult books to the community – with a simple concept. Take a book and enjoy it. If you have a book to leave – please do so. Spread the love and support your community. And it works.

So here’s the list of South Australia’s street libraries (the ones we can find) from A to Z

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The 19 most beautiful libraries in the U.S.

The 19 most beautiful libraries in the U.S. | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
In honor of their beauty and to underscore their continued relevance in an increasingly digital world, we’ve rounded up 19 architecturally significant museums throughout the United States.
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Hidden America: Inside the secret rooms in landmarks across the US

Hidden America: Inside the secret rooms in landmarks across the US | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library also houses secret apartments (one of which is pictured), dating back to when custodians used to live on the premises and had to keep fueling the coal furnaces for heating
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Information illiterate: Challenges libraries face in this fake news era

Information illiterate: Challenges libraries face in this fake news era | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Imagine, for a moment, the technology of 2017 had existed on Jan. 11, 1964 — the day Luther Terry, surgeon general of the United States, released “Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States.”

What would be some likely scenarios?

The social media noise machine explodes; conservative websites immediately paint the report as a nanny-government attack on personal freedom and masculinity; the report’s findings are hit with a flood of satirical memes, outraged Facebook posts, attack videos and click-bait fake news stories; Big Tobacco’s publicity machine begins pumping out disinformation via both popular social media and pseudoscientific predatory journals willing to print anything for a price; Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater characterizes “Smoking and Health” as a “communist-inspired hoax.”

Eventually, the Johnson administration distances itself from the surgeon general’s controversial report.
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Keyes: Go on ‘blind date with a book' at local library

Keyes: Go on ‘blind date with a book' at local library | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
How are you planning to celebrate Valentine’s Day this year? A romantic dinner? Chocolate candies? A poetic Valentine card? Red roses? All of the above? These are great ideas, but maybe your budget doesn’t stretch that far.
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#Fake #News, #Alternative #Facts and #Librarians As Dedicated Defenders of #Truth @jenniferlagarde

#Fake #News, #Alternative #Facts and #Librarians As Dedicated Defenders of #Truth @jenniferlagarde | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

"Let's be clear, there's no such thing as "alternative facts."

The same fact can be used by different people to support alternative opinions, but the facts don't change. Different people can use the same facts to emphasize alternative ideas or to inform different theories, but the facts remain the same. Facts are non-partisan. Facts alone are neutral. It's what we do with them that becomes controversial.

That said, there's a not so old saying that goes "we are drowning in information, but starving for knowledge." (Note: the fact that this saying is attributed to at least 5 different people when I do a quick search for the author is an irony that has not escaped me, but I digress). These days, getting answers to your questions is just about the easiest thing in the world. Getting the right answer is more challenging. Librarians (and Neil Gaiman) have known this for years, but one thing is certain, in the information age, discerning fact from fiction is THE "21st century skill."


Via John Evans
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Jeroen Clemens's curator insight, January 28, 4:13 AM
very important task for education
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 30, 2:48 AM
Librarians As Dedicated Defenders of Truth
Character Minutes's curator insight, February 13, 5:46 PM
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A canon round for democracy: The literati’s power in a populist era is limited, but vital

A canon round for democracy: The literati’s power in a populist era is limited, but vital | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
f Beyoncé and Jay Z plugging Hillary failed to resist Trump, what can Writers Resist do? Maybe more than you think
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