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Librarians in 3D Trailer

A trailer for a short University of Toronto student film that challenges stereotypes used to define librarians. To Donate please go here: http://tinyurl.com/...
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Librarysoul
The search for reinvention of libraries from the deepest belief in the social relevance of a save harbour in the public domain
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An Elegy for the Library

An Elegy for the Library | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

By MAHESH RAOFEB. 17, 2017
Credit Josh Cochran
MYSORE, India — It’s an unseasonably hot winter day in this southern city, and the midmorning sun is turning the crumbling yellow stucco of the 100-year-old City Central Library a shade paler. A hawker is yelling on the busy road, trying to drum up business for his collection of old coins and medals. As I take the stairs to the main level, I can see a bit of a line at the water fountain.

The occupants of the small reading room are all middle-age men poring over newspapers in at least three languages. The ceiling fans whir. Pages rustle. Not one man is looking at his phone. Overhead a framed poster features a paraphrase of a line from the novelist Neil Gaiman: “Google can bring you 100,000 answers but a librarian can bring you the right one.” Fighting words.

In the larger reading room the crowd is mixed. An elderly woman looks up from her notebook; a lanky boy is mouthing the words he reads. Every seat is occupied, and I wander between the stacks: Astronomy, Home Economics, Satire in Kannada Literature.

Every so often, there are rumblings, among students gathered on the front steps or in the local press, that the library will close: the predatory gaze of developers is never far. And I’m more conscious than ever of the many things we would lose.

Wherever I’ve lived, I’ve used the library. When I was growing up in Nairobi, Kenya, I would sometimes go to a tiny community library run by a church organization. It was a stronghold of stalwarts; there were hardly ever any new faces. The dust was thick. Branches of a jacaranda tree pressed against the single large window. The place had a vaguely medicinal smell, as though along with tonic for the mind, it administered tinctures and liniments.

One evening a few minutes before closing, the librarian and I were packing up at the same time. He glanced over at one of my books and did a cinematic double take.

“That’s not from this library?” he asked.

“No, it’s mine,” I said, telling the truth but sounding cagey. I was in early adolescence, and everything I said seemed like an admission of guilt.

Mahesh Rao is the author of “The Smoke is Rising” and “One Point Two Billion.”

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTOpinion), and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter.

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Big Read in the Big Apple: NYC Launches Reading Initiative

Big Read in the Big Apple: NYC Launches Reading Initiative | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

At the end of January, the New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment announced One Book, One New York, a reading program that urges residents of all five boroughs to read the same book, starting in early March. If successful, this will form the largest reading community in the country. But can New Yorkers agree on the same book?  Fifteen years ago, as the New York Times reported, a similar initiative collapsed because the organizers were unable to pick a title. This year, city officials asked an advisory panel of public library heads, publishers, and academics to suggest possible candidates, which they then winnowed down to five books. The public have until February 28 to vote online for the winner.
The main branch of the New York Public Library will host an event in June with the winning book’s author. [This might be a bit tricky as Betty Smith, the author of the nominated A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, died in 1972.] 

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The Librarian of Congress and the Greatness of Humility

The Librarian of Congress and the Greatness of Humility | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The new Librarian of Congress, Dr. Carla Hayden, is highly motivated to make this library, and all libraries, a favorite object of the people. Hayden is the first person of color, and the first woman, to lead the Library of Congress; she is also the first actual librarian to lead it since 1974. Her predecessor, Dr. James Billington, a distinguished Russia scholar appointed by Ronald Reagan, was beloved for his intellect but criticized for mismanagement; he neglected, for many years, to appoint a chief information officer, which was required by law, and he also didn’t use e-mail. Hayden, a former head of the American Library Association, revitalized and modernized Baltimore’s twenty-two-branch Enoch Pratt Free Library system. President Obama nominated her, in 2010, to be a member of the National Museum and Library Services Board, and, last year, to become Librarian of Congress.

Hayden met a bit of opposition on her way to confirmation—the usual resistance to Obama’s later appointments, for one, and a tempest in a teapot about the use of Internet filters at public-library computers. More significant, some Republicans didn’t like Hayden’s firm resistance to the privacy encroachments of the Patriot Act when she was head of the  A.L.A. Her opposition to what she saw as potentially McCarthyite government intrusion into citizens’ privacy earned her a Ms. Woman of the Year distinction in 2003. (“When the FBI came snooping, Carla Diane Hayden proved librarians are more freedom fighters than shushers,” Ms. wrote.) Mention her name to a New York Public Library staffer, and there’s a frisson of excitement; at her raucous and bustling sendoff in Baltimore, a high-school librarian, quoted in the Washington Post, called her a “rock star.”
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Libraries are Forever: E-Books & Print Books Can Coexist [Infographic] | Daily Infographic

Libraries are Forever: E-Books & Print Books Can Coexist [Infographic] | Daily Infographic | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
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Library of Congress Card Catalog

Library of Congress Card Catalog | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

For decades, an elegant card catalog occupied a central spot in the Library of Congress Main Reading Room. Before computerization, it was as central to the research process as a search engine in the present day.

When the Main Reading Room was closed for renovation in 1987 the Library returned the room to its original form with desks in a full circle. This meant moving the card catalog to desks adjacent to the Main Reading Room on the first floor of the Jefferson Building. No cards have been added since 1980, but the catalog is still used by researchers and librarians.

The Library of Congress card catalog system dates back to 1898. By 1901 the LC Card Division was producing vast quantities of them for sale to libraries across the country. Every book in the collection had a standardized card listing, relevant metadata, and cross-referenced topics.

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The Most Exciting Medical Technologies of 2017 - The Medical Futurist

The Most Exciting Medical Technologies of 2017 - The Medical Futurist | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

2016 was a rich year for medical technology. Virtual Reality. Augmented Reality. Smart algorithms analysing wearable data. Amazing technologies arrived in our lives and on the market almost every day. And it will not stop in the coming year.

The role of a futurist is certainly not making bold predictions about the future. No such big bet has taken humanity forward. Instead, our job is constantly analysing the trends shaping the future and trying to build bridges between them and what we have today. Still, people expect me to come up with predictions about medical technologies every year, and thus here they are.

The top technologies with the biggest promise for 2017

1) A new era in diabetes care
2) Precision medicine in oncology
3) Narrow artificial intelligence in US clinics
4) Driverless trucks or cars will include health sensors
5) New service in nutrigenomics
6) SpaceX and NASA will realize they need a digital health masterplan to reach Mars
7) The genome editing method CRISPR in clinical trials
8) A big tech company will step into health

and more

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Milner Library Is Digitizing the Colorful History of the Circus

Milner Library Is Digitizing the Colorful History of the Circus | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

This May, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will be ending their 146-year run with one final show at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on Long Island. As the famous circus company shutters its traveling doors (a result of high costs and dipping ticket sales), Illinois State University’s Milner Library is working to preserve the industry's unique culture. The library has spent years protecting circus history by digitizing thousands of posters, photographs, and Kodachrome slides. After receiving a $268,000 grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources, the library can now expand their online collection by digitizing over 300 circus route books spanning from 1842 to 1969. The project, which will take about three years, will help preserve the legacy of the circus for generations to come

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Ukrainian librarian under house arrest takes case to court of human rights

Ukrainian librarian under house arrest takes case to court of human rights | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Natalya Sharina, a Ukrainian librarian held under house arrest in Russia since October 2015, has taken her case to the European court of human rights in Strasbourg. Since her arrest in 2015, the Russian authorities have extended the order for Sharina, director of the Ukrainian Literature Library in Moscow, to be detained at home repeatedly, despite calls for her release.

In a move roundly condemned by human rights groups, Sharina went on trial in November 2016 for incitement by stocking books banned in Russia and labelled extremist and “anti-Russian propaganda”. Three weeks after the trial began, embezzlement was added to the list of charges. If found guilty, she faces up to 10 years in prison.

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Tiny Street Libraries Are Popping Up All Over South Australia | Glam Adelaide

Tiny Street Libraries Are Popping Up All Over South Australia | Glam Adelaide | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Over the last few years, there’s been a quiet phenomenon gaining momentum around the globe. Across Europe, the US and now Australia, tiny little libraries have been popping up on suburban streets, in regional areas, and in parks and playgrounds, to encourage literacy and a love of books in areas without traditional libraries. This week’s viral ABC News video profiling the growing trend in Australia, had us wondering – has South Australia been involved with this and we just didn’t know about it? Turns out it has. There’s well over a dozen little libraries across Adelaide and the State, bringing both kids and adult books to the community – with a simple concept. Take a book and enjoy it. If you have a book to leave – please do so. Spread the love and support your community. And it works.

So here’s the list of South Australia’s street libraries (the ones we can find) from A to Z

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The 19 most beautiful libraries in the U.S.

The 19 most beautiful libraries in the U.S. | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
In honor of their beauty and to underscore their continued relevance in an increasingly digital world, we’ve rounded up 19 architecturally significant museums throughout the United States.
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Hidden America: Inside the secret rooms in landmarks across the US

Hidden America: Inside the secret rooms in landmarks across the US | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
The New York Public Library also houses secret apartments (one of which is pictured), dating back to when custodians used to live on the premises and had to keep fueling the coal furnaces for heating
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Information illiterate: Challenges libraries face in this fake news era

Information illiterate: Challenges libraries face in this fake news era | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Imagine, for a moment, the technology of 2017 had existed on Jan. 11, 1964 — the day Luther Terry, surgeon general of the United States, released “Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States.”

What would be some likely scenarios?

The social media noise machine explodes; conservative websites immediately paint the report as a nanny-government attack on personal freedom and masculinity; the report’s findings are hit with a flood of satirical memes, outraged Facebook posts, attack videos and click-bait fake news stories; Big Tobacco’s publicity machine begins pumping out disinformation via both popular social media and pseudoscientific predatory journals willing to print anything for a price; Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater characterizes “Smoking and Health” as a “communist-inspired hoax.”

Eventually, the Johnson administration distances itself from the surgeon general’s controversial report.
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Keyes: Go on ‘blind date with a book' at local library

Keyes: Go on ‘blind date with a book' at local library | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
How are you planning to celebrate Valentine’s Day this year? A romantic dinner? Chocolate candies? A poetic Valentine card? Red roses? All of the above? These are great ideas, but maybe your budget doesn’t stretch that far.
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Libraries Resist: A Round-Up of Tolerance, Social Justice, & Resistance in US Libraries

Libraries Resist: A Round-Up of Tolerance, Social Justice, & Resistance in US Libraries | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Libraries are not, nor have they ever been, neutral spaces. They are political. Every decision made in a library, from books to be included in the collection, to displays created, to special populations to reach, is political. Many believe that libraries and librarians are apolitical, but it’s simply not true. It’s impossible to be a neutral space with the goal of reaching a community, be it the public or the academic or the special population the library serves. By inviting all in a community to be in a shared space, libraries embrace the idea of encouraging education, encouraging acceptance and tolerance, and on a much smaller scale, they create policies that ensure these very things happen in their spaces.

No act in the library is too small to foster tolerance and acceptance.

That said, some libraries can and do, thanks to their own policies, embrace their non-neutrality in much louder ways than others. Here’s a look at some of the recent actions taken by libraries of all shapes and sizes and specialties around the USA. The selection of libraries here were submitted by librarians and friends of libraries; in these instances, I’ve included some of the comments received, too, about the ways their communities or administrations have or have not criticized their efforts.
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Librarians across the country protest, resist, and persist » MobyLives

Librarians across the country protest, resist, and persist » MobyLives | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
We’ve already written about the incredible work that librarians are doing on the front lines of the fight against fake news. But their resistance against the current administration is also more immediate, more direct, and more far-reaching than that effort. Elizabeth Flock at PBS NewsHour took a look at what libraries across the country are offering their communities, from protests to sanctuary.

Librarians found the executive orders aimed at immigrants particularly offensive, because, as Massachusetts librarian Elizabeth McKinstry told Flock, “We are huge resources for newcomers to this country, whether it’s for connection to this country, legal resources, testing preparation, citizen tests, services like storytimes or homework help. We are there for the most vulnerable folks in our communities, people on the other side of the digital or language divide.”
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Do Libraries Need Ebooks? - Digital Book World

Do Libraries Need Ebooks? - Digital Book World | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
At the American Library Association’s mid-winter meeting in Seattle last week, discussion swirled around libraries and ebooks – as it has in the library community for several years now.
 
Access to ebooks for patrons is still a high priority and librarians are “frustrated with the pace of change,” according to Sari Feldman, executive director of the Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Public Library and co-chair of ALA’s Digital Content & Libraries Working Group. Librarians are also unhappy with library ebook licenses that are limiting or when ebooks are more expensive for libraries to purchase and the “ALA anticipates that continued, or stepped up, advocacy will be necessary in 2013.” So look forward to that.
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Jane Cowell's curator insight, February 18, 11:41 PM
Digital requires libraries to rethink delivery - radical collaboration between libraries needed
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The (Nearly) Perfect Training Room

The (Nearly) Perfect Training Room | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Training Rooms in Libraries

Library space, where librarians teach information literacy, should not look like an old-fashioned classroom or a computerized training room which might be found in a computer centre. In a traditional information technology training room or a computer laboratory.  The furniture and its arrangement convey messages to occupants: don’t move, don’t discuss, don’t feel comfortable! Tables are usually placed in rows. There are rarely windows that allow views of the outside world. The computers and large monitors dominate, there might be some digitized displays – but there is limited space for the learners. The students using the facility will become tired very quickly. The following images of traditional training rooms typify the stereotyped and stultifying atmosphere which develops, even if the colours are bright.
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Before Amazon, We Had Bookmobiles: 15+ Rare Photos Of Libraries-On-Wheels

Before Amazon, We Had Bookmobiles: 15+ Rare Photos Of Libraries-On-Wheels | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Long before Amazon, Audible, and other digital book distributors, bookmobiles were bringing literature to peoples' doorsteps. Their mission was to provide the
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Ukraine publishers speak out against ban on Russian books

Ukraine publishers speak out against ban on Russian books | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

Ukrainian publishers have reacted angrily to their government’s ban on importing books from Russia, claiming it will create a black market and damage the domestic industry.

The ban, passed by Ukraine’s parliament, is the latest front in the battle between Kiev and Moscow that has been running since Russia annexed Crimea and pro-Russian forces seized power in parts of eastern Ukraine in 2014. Books from Russia account for up to 60% of all titles sold in Ukraine and are estimated to make up 100,000 sales a year.

Although the ban has been under discussion since September, its sudden implementation caught booksellers and publishers by surprise. Speaking to Eugene Gerden of the Publishing Perspectives website, Alexander Afonin of the Ukrainian Association of Publishers and Booksellers warned the move would lead to a shortage of books and force Russian titles underground. He predicted that the ban would last until 1 April at least.

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Amazon to Open Bookstore in San Francisco Suburb, Unstore in Cleveland | The Digital Reader

Amazon to Open Bookstore in San Francisco Suburb, Unstore in Cleveland | The Digital Reader | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

There's no mention on Amazon's website but it seems the retailer is planning to open its next Amazon Books location in Walnut Creek, Calif.:

Following the departure of Barnes & Noble last year and the demise of several chain and independent bookstores in the city over the decades, online giant Amazon is planning a brick-and-mortar book store in Broadway Plaza.

Amazon spokeswoman Sarah Gelman confirmed the Seattle-based online retailer is opening an Amazon Books and hiring workers at the high-end shopping center.

Whatever the final incarnation, Amazon’s foray into tony Walnut Creek doesn’t shock Laurelle Swan, who operates the city’s last remaining independently-owned book store, Swan’s Fine Books.

“I’m not surprised Amazon came in because they saw a need here for new books,” she said.

Despite its booming retail, dining and arts scene and its state-of-the-art public library, the city lacks a book store where shoppers can browse the shelves for the latest bestseller or newest cook book. The nearest general interest bookstores are in Concord, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda and San Ramon.
This will be the 9th Amazon Books location.

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Not so long ago the end of the physical book and bookstore were predicted. This had a great impact on libraries all over the world (closing and budget cuts). Now the opposite is happening.
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A Love Letter to My Library — Library Lover's Day

A Love Letter to My Library — Library Lover's Day | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Valentine's Day isn't the only thing happening on February 14—it's also a day to pay some respect to your local library by celebrating Library Lover's Day. We don't observe every random holiday around here, but libraries are definitely worthy of our affection.
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How “Sensitivity Readers” From Minority Groups Are Changing the Book Publishing Ecosystem

How “Sensitivity Readers” From Minority Groups Are Changing the Book Publishing Ecosystem | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

When Becky Albertalli published her first young adult novel, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, with the HarperCollins imprint Balzer and Bray in 2015, she never expected it to be controversial. She’d worked for years as a clinical psychologist specializing in gender nonconforming children and LGBTQ teens and adults.* Yet her book—about a closeted gay kid whose love notes to a classmate fall into the wrong hands—contained a moment that rubbed readers the wrong way: Simon, the sweet but clueless protagonist, muses that girls have an easier time coming out than boys, because their lesbianism strikes others as alluring. At a book signing, several people approached Albertalli to complain that the scene played too readily into a narrative they’d heard many times before. Online, commenters condemned the “fetishization of queer girls” in the book as “offensive.” Albertalli hadn’t originally given the passage a second thought: the character was obviously unworldly; elsewhere, he asserts that all Jews come from Israel. But in the latter exchange, readers pointed out, Simon’s Jewish friend immediately corrects him. The lesbian line, a snippet from the narrator’s interior monologue, receives no such rebuttal.

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New York City is creating America's biggest book club by picking one book for everyone to read

New York City is creating America's biggest book club by picking one book for everyone to read | Librarysoul | Scoop.it

New York City has launched a new program called “One Book, One New York” to encourage all city residents to read the same book.

The initiative allows New Yorkers in all five boroughs to vote on one of five books to start reading in the month of March. Residents can vote online or in kiosks in subway stations until February 28.

The effort is an attempt to give small bookstores throughout the city a boost and, as the program’s title suggests, create a sense of community among the city’s readers.

Other cities such as Chicago and Philadelphia have hosted community reads in the past, though none have created as large a book club as New York can.

In partnership with Buzzfeed, the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment turned to those other cities to suggest books for people to read. It also consulted with heads of local libraries, publishers, and academics, the New York Times reports.

The shortlist offers five choices: “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Sellout” by Paul Beatty, “Americanah” by Chimamanda Ngozi-Adichie, “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith, and “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” by Junot Diaz

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
In The netherlands the whole country and all libraries are engaged in all reading one book. It's known as "Nederland leest" (The Netherlands is reading)
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Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC

Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
World Architecture Community News - Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC
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Ambitious library to carry capital's literary ambitions

Ambitious library to carry capital's literary ambitions | Librarysoul | Scoop.it
Businessman Boonchai Cheauchanwong was more than happy to hear that the "Bangkok City Library" will be opening in March, two months ahead of schedule.

"I am looking forward to the modern public library. It will help children learn, and benefit our entire city," Mr Boonchai, 49, said.

He added that the facility is essential to improving Thais' quality of life and their access to knowledge and learning.

"Access to facilities including a public library is one of the basic rights city residents deserve, courtesy of the government," he said.

Mr Boonchai was talking about a project by the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) to convert an old building at Kok Wua intersection into a new city library.

The project is part of a campaign to promote the capital as a "City of Learning", which aims to promote a culture of reading
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