Library world, new trends, technologies
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Library world, new trends, technologies
All about library world from new technologies to new trends to information literacy
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Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District)

Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District) | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

by Michelle Cingrani 

 

"The Arapahoe (Colorado) Library District (ALD) is making difficult-to-access technology available for patrons – like Google Glass, 3D printing, and The Studio, which is a state-of-the-art soundproof library space featuring a green screen and everything needed to create a masterpiece – including iMacs with Adobe Creative Cloud, iMovie, GarageBand, high-definition video cameras, a guitar, a keyboard, and more.  

“ALD is redefining libraries as warehouses of information to evolving centers where patrons can experience and use cutting-edge technology,” said ALD Executive Director Nicolle Davies. “Libraries are portals to the latest information – and offering access to technology is the newest version of that role.”


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Technology Game Changers for Libraries

Technology Game Changers for Libraries | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

Dr Steve Matthews:

"A recent article by Technology writer Christina Farr for GOOD Technology titled The Top 10 Technology Game Changers for the Next Decade sparked my interest, since technology is changing the game in libraries.

 

"There were at least three of her 10 that I felt directly impacted libraries and the way we will have to do business. They are:

1. Visual Learning Robotics

2. Internet Data Expansion

3. Voice Recognition"


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies , Karen du Toit
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23 things for professional development, training and networking for Information Professionals

A talk given to the Historic Libraries Forum conference 'Hard Times' on Tuesday 15 November 2011.

 

 

23 things for professional development training and networking in hard times, by Katie Birkwood, University Library Cambridge
"23 Things‟ is a type of training……which started at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County (North Carolina, USA) in August 2006.
the PLCMC course aimed…“…to encourage staff to experiment and learn about the new and emerging technologies that are reshaping the context of information on the Internet today”
23 things course gives participants 23 tools to try out and asks them to write a blog post about each of them.

things are introduced according to a schedule, but participants choose when to do each thing.

blogging is intended to encourage support and communication amongst and between participants.
23 things has been hugely popular…"


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How Libraries Remain Relevant, by Chandra Steele - National Libraries Week

National Library Week: How Libraries Remain Relevant http://t.co/zILGyXS4 via @pcmag...

 Chandra Steele: 

 

" [...] the real purpose of a library is to amass and disseminate knowledge. So, even if printed matter were to disappear, libraries would still be a cultural necessity.
Rather than limiting their domain, libraries have steadily expanded it by introducing their communities to technology through initiatives, classes, Internet access, and even a repurposing of their facilities. They potentially could serve as tech incubators. Two decades before the iPad would become a virtual library, Steve Jobs, in a video for the Library of Congress, said, "We're not going to tear down our libraries, but we're not going to be building too many more."


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The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed

The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

Submitted by Patricia J Delois:

RT @sallyheroes: "It appears that the number one thing patrons use the library for is (prepare yourself) books": http://t.co/CEiQTtdC via @JustinLibrarian...

 

"[...] surprised they would select books when they have so many other things to choose from. I imagine he’s even more surprised to learn that something else patrons rate highly is personal interaction with the staff. I don’t know who designed the survey, but it couldn’t have been the director. It wouldn’t have occurred to him to put “human interaction” on the list of things patrons might value. He’s all about technology.

No one disputes that technology has improved the library experience for the patron. You can search the catalog from home and access our subscribed databases. You can place your own holds, request your own interlibrary loan materials, download books to your own devices.

The library is working towards self-checkout, presumably so you can conduct all your library business without ever having to interact with the staff. This must sound like a dream-come-true for the director, who hates to interact with the library staff, but for patrons, there’s more to the library than just the delivery of materials. They like human contact."


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Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms

Thoughts from Carl Grant: Why and how librarians have to shape the new cloud computiong platforms | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

Carl Grant:

"At the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, I gave the keynote talk at the NISO Update Session. My goal was to give attendees some thoughts about how important it is that they participate actively in the shaping of the new cloud-computing platforms which are are emerging from a number of organizations, including OCLC, Ex Libris, Serials Solution, Innovative and Kuali. I stated that the main reason for our participation as librarians is simply this: So we can ensure the value of librarianship is contained within and amplified by these new technological foundations.

 

There were three key points I talked about us doing in order to accomplish this. They were:

1. The mission and value of librarianship have to be embedded in the software you’re using.

2. Defining our future is a task of participation, NOT representation.

3. For our services to have value they must offer differentiation."


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10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities

10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

By Staff Writers:

"In honor of School Library Month, check out the ways libraries are going to blossom in the coming years."

 

"[...] the almost uncanny ability to consistently adapt to the changing demands of the local populace and emerging technology alike. The library system probably won’t disappear anytime soon, but rather, see itself blossoming into something new and exciting in congruence with today’s myriad informational demands."

 

1. More technology

2. Sensory story times

3. Better outreach to ESOL and ESL adults & children

4. Automation

5. Emphasizing community space

6. More social media savvy

7. Digital media labs

8. Electronic outposts

9. Crowdsourcing

10. More active librarians


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The Role of Social Media for Libraries [and e-books], Part II » Heather Backman - New York #ebooks

by Lisa Chau:

Heather Backman 

"She discusses here how technology such as e-books affected the library:

In one sense, e-books have changed very little about what libraries do or how we do it; they just allow us to deliver a basic library service in a different medium. Some people have said that e-books are “killing” the printed book or that they spell the end of libraries, but that hasn’t been my experience. To my mind, the e-book is not “killing” the printed book, just supplementing it. We are still buying physical books in large quantities and I expect that we will continue to do so for a long time. I would go so far as to say that I doubt the physical book will ever completely go away. Even if it does, libraries are more about information-sharing than about lending physical items; handling e-books may mean changes in some of our procedures but I don’t think that libraries will cease to exist when the e-book predominates."


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