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Library world, new trends, technologies
All about library world from new technologies to new trends to information literacy
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Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District)

Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District) | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

by Michelle Cingrani 

 

"The Arapahoe (Colorado) Library District (ALD) is making difficult-to-access technology available for patrons – like Google Glass, 3D printing, and The Studio, which is a state-of-the-art soundproof library space featuring a green screen and everything needed to create a masterpiece – including iMacs with Adobe Creative Cloud, iMovie, GarageBand, high-definition video cameras, a guitar, a keyboard, and more.  

“ALD is redefining libraries as warehouses of information to evolving centers where patrons can experience and use cutting-edge technology,” said ALD Executive Director Nicolle Davies. “Libraries are portals to the latest information – and offering access to technology is the newest version of that role.”


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, January 14, 6:18 AM

Future libraries!

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21st Century Libraries Look Like: Something Unexpected, by Steve Matthews

21st Century Libraries Look Like: Something Unexpected, by Steve Matthews | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it
Here are some images from numerous resources that typify something unexpected in a library. They draw attention to libraries and open up the idea of "library" to new understanding and new customers...

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, May 6, 2013 6:56 AM

Bright ideas of libraries doing it differently!!

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, May 6, 2013 7:19 AM

Lovely ideas! 

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Library is no longer just for readers - San Antonio Express

Library is no longer just for readers - San Antonio Express | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

"For eight years, the Landa Gardens Conservancy, a nonprofit volunteer organization, has been working to make the library more than just a place to check out books.
With more than $1.5 million it raised, the group has transformed the library in the historic Monte Vista neighborhood into a community center where parents can take their children to play and students from nearby Trinity University can sit under shade trees to read.
In 2008, the organization remade the five acres of land that surround the former private mansion by installing 30 benches, a medieval community garden and more than 7,000 plants.
Also that year, the conservancy commissioned Carlos Cortes, the craftsman responsible for the city's public art made of concrete designed to look like wood — called faux bois — to create the pavilion.
In 2011, new playground equipment was installed. This year, shade trees were added near the playground.
The organization strives to make the library an enjoyable place for anyone in the city, not just those in the neighborhood, said the group's former president, Ann Van Pelt, who now serves as a member of the board of directors."

 

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/article/Library-is-no-longer-just-for-readers-3640773.php#ixzz1y8JEaSbF

 


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Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes

Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

R David Lankes:

A librarian plays devil's advocate for those who argue libraries are obsolete (but there is a happy ending).

 

"There are few of us who can know the exact moment their career ended. However when a professor of library science argues libraries are obsolete against a Harvard law school professor and the head of the lead funding agency in the field I think that moment has arrived. This was where I found myself April 18th when I took part in an Oxford-style debate as part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations. The idea was to mix humor with serious debate on the proposition that “Libraries are Obsolete.” I was asked to argue for the proposition.Now this is a rather odd position to be in since I have spent my career arguing exactly the opposite, but in the spirit of playing devil’s advocate, and the fact that I have tenure, I jumped in. After all, if we don’t honestly debate the point, how can we truly be sure we are not headed towards obsolescence [more on my rational see this post]."

http://quartz.syr.edu/blog/?p=1557

 


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Designing Better Libraries » Getting Community Members Beyond The Level One Library Experience

Among the more recognized and often repeated findings emerging from Ithaka S & R’s faculty research studies, including the recent 2012 report, is the revelation that faculty primarily perceive the academic library as their purchasing agent.

[...]

Four levels of user experience (column titled “Building Customer Communities is the Key to Creating Value“) and how to get there:

 

1. In Level One the organization is perceived by its customers as simply the supplier of some commodity

2. A Level Two experience would represent an improvement for librarians because it moves beyond content to a state where community members believe you help them accomplish something, but it’s more than just basic productivity.

3. At Level Three there is more engagement, emotional connection and relationship building.

4. the library achieves platform status.

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, May 7, 2013 8:25 AM

Assessment of library experiences, and how to go to an engaged relationship with users!

repeatagain's curator insight, May 9, 2013 5:18 PM

what libraries deliver is a level one experience – and we need to do better than that...

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How to kill a library, By Kitty Pope

How to kill a library, By Kitty Pope | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

"[...]there are more than a few ways to kill a library.

For example:

√ Stop believing in the libraries mission. Do we really believe in the freedom to read, learn and discover?

√ Spend less time with the board. The ideal public library board would meet 4 times per year and agrees with everything the CEO recommended.

√ Stop talking to your customers. What do they know any way? And on the same topic, stop consulting staff. It is a huge time waster.

√ Don’t worry about the future and how you will get there. Sustainability is not an issue with which libraries need to be concerned. After all, we’ve have survived for hundreds of years.

√ Stop telling the library story. Everyone has heard our story.

√ Accept that the library building is old and you don’t need to keep renovating, painting, and updating it. It is what it is.

√ Accept that just like instant coffee killed the coffee bean, the e-book will kill the printed book.

√ Stop promoting the product; everyone knows about literacy and lifelong learning.

√ Stop empowering staff, and stop training them. They should come to us fully trained.

√ Stop all this talk about innovation. It just makes for more work.

√ And, for heaven’s sake, stop changing the rules and our traditions. It’s annoying!"


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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | Library world, new trends, technologies | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."


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