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Mental health problems treated as security issue in federal prisons, report says - Toronto Star

Mental health problems treated as security issue in federal prisons, report says - Toronto Star | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Toronto StarMental health problems treated as security issue in federal prisons, report saysToronto StarOTTAWA—Correctional Investigator Howard Sapers is pointing to a new and alarming sign Canada's prison system has adopted the wrong approach to...
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Child marriage: A closer look at the story behind the headlines

Child marriage: A closer look at the story behind the headlines | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Last week the New South Wales government said a tsunami of young girls were being forced to marry overseas. But do the headlines reflect the truth about how common this is?
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Pop. 17,049: Welcome to America's largest jail

Pop. 17,049: Welcome to America's largest jail | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Here's one thing you may not think about when landing at Los Angeles International Airport: Just 11 miles away sits America's biggest jail system.
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Honeybees give former prisoners a new chance

Beekeeping offers former prisoners in Chicago transitional jobs as they re-enter the workforce.
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UN Outraged By Australian Man's 'Inhumane And Degrading' Jail Time

UN Outraged By Australian Man's 'Inhumane And Degrading' Jail Time | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
The disabled man served 10 years for alleged child sex crimes but he was never convicted.
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Prisoners serving life sentences will never be housed in minimum security

PRISONERS serving life sentences will never be housed in minimum security under changes to be introduced by the State Government. The decision has come on the recommendation of an upper house inquiry into ­security classification and management of prisoners which followed revelations last year that Andrew Garforth, who killed nine-year-old Ebony Simpson in 1992, had been downgraded on the advice of the Serious Offenders Review Council. Corrective Services Minister David Elliott reversed the decision at the time and yesterday said he would ­implement the committee’s recommendation. Garforth, 52, was jailed for life “never to be released” for the murder of Ebony at Bargo after he abducted her as she walked home before raping and killing her. Mr Elliott is now pledging to create a “separate classification for inmates ... sentenced to life imprisonment’’. “Inmates serving life sentences will never be allowed to progress to a minimum security environment,” he said.

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Life after 19 years in prison: one man's story

Life after 19 years in prison: one man's story | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
After 19 years behind bars, a convicted murderer is released. How does he come to terms with his past – and create a new life?
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The banning of books in prisons: 'It's like living in the dark ages'

The banning of books in prisons: 'It's like living in the dark ages' | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Dan Slater’s book Wolf Boy is the latest of many to be banned to American prisoners for reasons that seem capricious, illogical and vindictive
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'Stark reality': how NT's justice system is failing Indigenous domestic violence victims

'Stark reality': how NT's justice system is failing Indigenous domestic violence victims | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Coroner Greg Cavanagh’s report on the death of two Alice Springs women says family and domestic violence in Northern Territory ‘is literally out of control’
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Today in WA: Debt defaulters flood into jails

At some point during the past decade, West Australians stopped paying their court fines and started going to prison in record numbers to clear their debts. Now the Barnett government has begun to make good on its promise to steer thousands of fine defaulters away from prisons and police cells and into community service, in line with other states. The status quo in WA is certainly a quick way to for a person with hefty fines to clear the slate — a unique formula devised by the previous WA Labor government lets defaulters cut out their biggest fine at $250 per day in jail, while any other fines they have are deemed to have been served concurrently. For example, last year a Perth woman who accrued $32,850 in fines for 33 offences including assault, stealing and breaches of bail was able to clear the debt by serving 12 days in jail. The scheme was designed to allow sentenced prisoners — many with years of accumulated fines — to leave jail debt-free and with the best chance of starting anew. Instead, it created a perverse incentive for people who were not in jail to go there. Magistrates generally do not like it, because they have specifically issued a fine where they believed jail was not deserved. It is also an impost on the taxpayer, since it costs around $350 a day to keep a prisoner. Labor claims an explosion in the number of people entering prison to wipe fines in WA coincided with the Barnett government cracking down hard on people working off their fines. In short, Labor alleges, it was easy to breach the terms of a work order and get sent to jails. By 2014, one in seven adults entering a WA prison was there solely for the purpose of cutting out a fine. Women in particular began flooding into the state’s jails to clear debts — one in three new arrivals at female prisons in WA was there for no other reason but fine default in 2013. Aboriginal people were already grossly over-represented in WA prisons but the policy created even more indigenous prisoners. Between 2010 and 2014, one in six indigenous people who went to jail in WA did so to clear a fine, according to a discussion paper tabled in state parliament by Labor MP Paul Papalia. The Barnett government is giving magistrates more options when dealing with low-level offenders, including offering rehabilitation and community service instead of a fine at the time of sentencing. State Attorney-General Michael Mischin last night began reading the Sentencing Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 into parliament, saying the amendments were part of the Liberal National Government’s commitment to divert low-level first time offenders away from sentences that could lead to incarceration. “The concern is that in many cases, this creates a cycle of offending and convictions, where an inability or unwillingness to pay the fines leads to entry into the fines enforcement system and potentially imprisonment,” he said. “While legislation applies to everyone equally, one of the key aims of this amendment is to reduce the incarceration of Aboriginal people for the non-payment of fines for low level offences which don’t warrant imprisonment.” In WA, about 40 per cent of the adult prison population is Aboriginal. Mr Mischin said courts can still impose a fine on an offender, but then immediately offer the offender attendance at a rehabilitation program or unpaid community work in lieu of paying the fine. “As this measure will be a direct alternative to a fine, the involvement of the offender in any programs or work will be by agreement and therefore voluntary,” he said. “It is hoped that some of the more than 5000 volunteer organisations, not-for-profit community organisations and local governments across the state will become involved in the scheme.” The changes are a direct response to the 2014 death in custody of a 22-year-old Aboriginal woman who was paying off a $1000 fine in a Pilbara watch-house. Known for cultural reasons as Miss Dhu, she had accumulated fines as a minor and an adult for low level-offences including refusing to give her name to a police officer. Her inquest heard she died from an infection that nobody knew she had, after repeatedly begging to be hospitalised. In the months after her death, Premier Colin Barnett met Miss Dhu’s family and promised to make changes to keep minor offenders out of lockups.

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Prison officers watched as inmate blinded himself, says report

Prison officers watched as inmate blinded himself, says report | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Sean Lynch was observed self-harming for more than an hour by Northern Ireland jail staff who chose not to intervene, according to ombudsman
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Australia is locking up too many women but the UK offers a blueprint for a radical new approach

Australia is locking up too many women but the UK offers a blueprint for a radical new approach | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Australia female prison population has soared but many are jailed for minor offences. The UK's radical approach to women and prison, outlined in the 2007 Corston report, offers a model for Australia.
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Uncle Jack Charles goes back to prison to mentor inmates

Uncle Jack Charles goes back to prison to mentor inmates | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
For over a decade, actor and Indigenous leader Jack Charles has been banned from going to prison to mentor inmates. Until now.
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Pioneering domestic violence program targets mothers and sons

Pioneering domestic violence program targets mothers and sons | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
In an attempt to break the generational cycle of domestic violence, a new initiative involving boys and their mums is being trialled in Brisbane. The world-first program aims to stop domestic violence when it first appears: in boyhood.
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SC’s female inmates now more likely to be white – but it’s unclear why

SC’s female inmates now more likely to be white – but it’s unclear why | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
South Carolina’s female population in 2016 more accurately reflects the state’s general population, but officials can’t explain what triggered the change.
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'I hadn't read a book before prison – now I’m starting my PhD'

'I hadn't read a book before prison – now I’m starting my PhD' | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Homelessness. War. Poverty. Meet the students who overcame towering obstacles to get their master’s degrees
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Nationwide Prison Strike Against 'Slavery in America' Rolls on—Despite Media Blackout

Nationwide Prison Strike Against 'Slavery in America' Rolls on—Despite Media Blackout | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
The strike coincides with the anniversary of the 1971 uprising at Attica.
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Extreme torture in China’s prisons

Extreme torture in China’s prisons | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
{“contentType”:”NEWS_STORY”,”id”:{“value”:”7e4a796bc1401d593f5cc58d7fd32ecb”,”link”:”http:\/\/api.newsapi.com.au\/conte…
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Berkeley alumni's program to educate prisoners receives National Humanities Medal | The Daily Californian

Berkeley alumni's program to educate prisoners receives National Humanities Medal | The Daily Californian | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
The Prison University Project will be awarded the National Humanities Medal at the White House on Thursday for its efforts to provide the currently incarcerated with higher education.Read More…
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Melbourne criminals are increasingly trying to cover their tracks with gun silencers

Melbourne criminals are increasingly trying to cover their tracks with gun silencers | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Usually associated with assassins or secret agents in Hollywood movies, silencers have become an increasingly popular tool in Melbourne's underworld.
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Aboriginal inmate 'left braindead' after brawl with guards at SA prison

Aboriginal inmate 'left braindead' after brawl with guards at SA prison | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Sister says Wayne Morrison on life support after he allegedly attacked five prison guards during ‘critical incident’ at Yatala Labour prison
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Indigenous women, needing the most help, still face biased legal system

Indigenous women, needing the most help, still face biased legal system | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
At a time when media attention is quite rightly focused on ending family violence, Aboriginal women and girls still face unacceptably high levels of assault, homicide and intimidation. Australia needs to specifically address Indigenous women and children's difficulties in accessing justice in this country.
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Delay in notifying Indigenous death in custody prompts calls for legal overhaul

Delay in notifying Indigenous death in custody prompts calls for legal overhaul | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service seeks meeting with corrections minister after authorities took five days to notify them of the death of an Indigenous man at Fulham correctional centre
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'Punished for being unwell'

'Punished for being unwell' | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
Sometimes he breaks the law in the hope of being locked up - at least it's warm and he gets fed. But does anyone help him?
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Drug-related deaths reach record highs

Drug-related deaths reach record highs | Library@CSNSW | Scoop.it
The Office for National Statistics has released the very depressing figure for the number of drug-related deaths registered in 2015 - the highest ever recorded.
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