Libraries & Archives 101
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Libraries & Archives 101
Everything and anything you ever wanted to know about what's going on in World Libraries & Archives
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The Future of Libraries - 7 questions librarians need to answer - Lee Rainie (Slideshare)

"Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center Internet Project, runs through the seven questions libraries need to address as they consider future services and their role for their patrons and communities. He describes how project research about the changing role of technology in people’s lives affects the kinds of issues librarians need to address as they experience the disruptions of technology change."

[...]

1.  What’s the future of knowledge? 2.  What’s the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)? 3.  What’s the future of public technology and community anchor institutions? 4.  What’s the future of learning “spaces”? 5.  What’s the future of attention (and its structural holes)? 6.  What’s the franchise?7: Where do you fit on the dashboard?"

 


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 11, 2014 7:10 AM

Great questions to answer for the profession.

Marylène Goulet's comment, April 20, 2014 8:32 PM
Slide no. 29
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10 Unusual Micro Libraries | World Literature Today

10 Unusual Micro Libraries | World Literature Today | Libraries & Archives 101 | Scoop.it
RT @asymptotejrnl: what's not to love about these 10 unusual micro-libraries? http://t.co/R3Js7j9v1e @worldlittoday

 

Check out these ten unique micro libraries and community book shares that have brought books to cities, neighborhoods, parks, and even beaches.


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, June 28, 2013 3:45 AM

Very creative in creating micro libraries!

Jane Ramsey's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:01 AM

Interesting....

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Internet Librarians—The Power to Transform Libraries

by Cindy Shamel :

"The 16th annual Internet Librarian conference recently concluded in Monterey, Calif. More than a thousand registrants and 215 speakers tackled the topic Transformational Power of Internet Librarians. While the sessions ranged from accessibility of digital content to web analytics, two themes took center stage: the future role of libraries and the reality of ebooks. As it turns out, some would assert that the future role of libraries depends upon the ultimate impact of ebooks.
Role of Libraries

Depending upon whom you ask, libraries should serve as a platform for networking, return to their core competency as the keeper of print books, or launch new products and services as the enabler of content creation.

In the opening keynote address, David Weinberger advocated for the library as a platform for people, ideas, and works delivered through tools and services. Weinberger is senior researcher, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, co-director, Harvard Innovation Lab, and author of Too Big to Know. He says, rather than attempting to collect knowledge in the form of published works, librarians can advance knowledge through public learning, generous sharing, and the power of iteration. Weinberger used the experience of software developers as an example of fast, efficient, and effective learning as they collaborate through tutorials, versioning, and social connections to tweak and improve programs. He posited that libraries can serve as a networking platform that “provides the resources that let others create and flourish.”


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The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found

The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found | Libraries & Archives 101 | Scoop.it

By Ian Anstice:

"The Guardian held one of its online debates on libraries today. The discussion between several library experts (managers, campaigners, councillors) and anyone contributing online. Around 200 comments were made so it’s a little condfusing: I’ve endeavoured to summarise below, although doubtless I have missed some things which some would consider important. Main threads and arguments.

Are libraries declining due to technological change? Libraries are still needed, in some ways more than ever: internet/online access essential and libraries provide the access and skills to those without either or both. Seven million have never used the internet. Wikipedia etc don’t cover all information and are prone to deletion, accidental or otherwise and is also not entirely trustworthy anyway.  Libraries provide quiet study spaces.  Children need the books and everyone needs serendipity that bookshelves allow.  Bookstock is declining due to budget cuts.  It’s not black and white – books and e-books will co-exist. Books are still in demand with 244 million loans in England 2011/12,

Read more: http://www.publiclibrariesnews.com/2013/11/the-future-of-libraries-what-the-guardian-online-debate-found.html


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 29, 2013 7:40 AM

Main threads and arguments in the discussions! Interesting!

Alexina's curator insight, November 30, 2013 8:00 PM

This is a short summary of an extensive online discussion about public libraries in the UK, but much of the discussion applies to USA libraries too. I like libraries referred to as "Idea stores".

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UK Organization Publishes Research Into Public Library of the Future | LJ INFOdocket

UK Organization Publishes Research Into Public Library of the Future | LJ INFOdocket | Libraries & Archives 101 | Scoop.it

By Gary Price
The research comes from the Arts Council of England and is found in a report titled, The Library of the Future.

 

This research has found that public libraries are trusted spaces, open to all, in which people continue to explore and share the joys of reading, information, knowledge and culture. It is clear that people value the services that libraries provide and will continue to do so. Indeed, there is a clear message that there is a compelling and continuing need for a publicly funded library service.

The research also reminds us that public libraries face many challenges in the coming years, including: advances in technology, which affect the ways in which people want to connect to information and culture; reduced public expenditure; the increasing involvement of citizens in the design and delivery of public services; and the needs of an ageing population.

Envisioning the library of the future and the work that comes from it will help us and our partners in the library sector to set out the value, role and purpose of public libraries with more clarity, pointing out ways they can respond to change in order to remain at the heart of their communities. This will provide the focus for our work in the future.

The research began in January 2012, and comprised three phases during which researchers spoke with more than 800 people. The research included an online survey which had over 1,400 responses, and 10,000 people viewed the online conversation. Read more on the research methodology.

Four priority areas

In order to foster a successful, sustainable library service in light of these challenges, the Arts Council has set out four priority areas for development which have been tested and corroborated by stakeholders:

place the library as the hub of the communitymake the most of digital technology and creative mediaensure that libraries are resilient and sustainabledeliver the right skills for those who work in libraries


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, May 24, 2013 7:21 AM

Great priority areas for the library of the future!!