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13 Tips for Teaching News and Information Literacy

13 Tips for Teaching News and Information Literacy | Future of education | Scoop.it

How can educators teach elementary and middle school students to be critical consumers of news and media? We asked media literacy experts—teachers and librarians—for their best tips. Here’s what they had to say.
Give them the vocabulary. “Much of media literacy exists in an abstract space, so I teach my youngest students the nouns of the conversation and take a knowledge-based approach instead of imparting values,” says John Landis, a media and technology teacher at Russell Byers Charter School in Philadelphia. In pre-K through third grade, Landis teaches them about commercials and the difference between fiction and nonfiction. “Once students are able to recognize that some shows on TV are fiction and some are nonfiction, we can then take the more critical step on how good a job the news does in representing reality in later grades,” he says.
Always save room for discussion. “If I had a dollar for every classroom I visited where there is no time spent asking students to summarize and respond to the information they are expected to interpret, I would be a millionaire,” notes Renee Hobbs, professor of communication studies at the Harrington School of Communication and Media at the University of Rhode Island. “Time must be spent having kids actively explain what they’ve seen in their own words, either in high-tech ways with Flipgrid, or old-school, like ‘pair share.’ It cannot be bypassed.”
Brien Jennings, library media specialist at Narragansett (RI) Elementary School, stresses the importance of encouraging questions, even from the youngest students. “In my experience, students are curious about all this stuff, even intellectual property,” he notes. Plus, getting children to create their own works, no matter how simple, is key. “I can connect not only to what’s going on in the professional media world, I can use their own work to illustrate concepts. And nothing engages students like seeing the work they or their peers have done.”

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Synced brainwaves reveal if students like class

To see if students actually enjoy a class—and get along with their classmates—check their brainwaves, a new study suggests.
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Future Ready Schools

Future Ready Schools | Future of education | Scoop.it
Future Ready Schools is a free, bold effort to maximize digital learning opportunities and help school districts move quickly toward preparing students for success in college, a career, and citizenship. This effort comes at a critical time as districts embrace college and career readiness as the goal for all students and recognize the potential of digital tools to help teachers personalize learning for each student. While less than 30 percent of U.S. schools have the bandwidth they need to teach using today’s technology, federal and state efforts are expanding this capacity to ensure that at least 99 percent of the nation’s students have access to high-speed internet in their schools within the next five years. Such connectivity, along with strategic planning by districts to maximize its availability, has the potential to transform the educational experiences of all students, regardless of their background. 
District leaders must respond to these changes with thoughtful planning to align necessary technologies with instructional goals to support teaching and learning. The effort provides districts with resources and support to ensure that local technology and digital learning plans align with instructional best practices, are implemented by highly trained teachers, and lead to personalized learning experiences for all students, particularly those from traditionally under-served communities. The Alliance for Excellent Education and the U.S. Department of Education are leading this effort alongside a vast coalition of national organizations. Future Ready Schools can be found at www.futurereadyschools.org. Districts can download the Future Ready Schools fact sheet here.
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5 Vital Truths About Education Technology | Emerging Education Technologies

5 Vital Truths About Education Technology | Emerging Education Technologies | Future of education | Scoop.it

"Study the Past if you Would Define the Future”  – Confucius 

Following are 5 undeniable realities of education technology, as I see them. What do you think? Feel free to weigh in with a comment and share your perspective. – KW

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21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever

21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever | Future of education | Scoop.it

Regardless of what we call them, the 21st century skills represent a type of skill that is not traditionally connected to standards and skills our students are evaluated on. Even though we know these types of skills are imperative to success in the workplace, in relationships, and in life–they are still seen often as “nice to have” instead of “need to have” for our students.

Seth Godin recently wrote an article, “Let’s Stop Calling Them Soft Skills“, in which he describes five categories of skills that we all look for in colleagues, employees, and students–yet, don’t seem to value over other content and standardized skills.

What I love about Seth’s view is that it is one outside of education. He has created businesses, written books, designed products, and even started his own altMBA school. Seth believes these so-called “soft skills” are more important now than ever before.

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25 resources for bringing AR and VR to the classroom

25 resources for bringing AR and VR to the classroom | Future of education | Scoop.it
The benefits of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) include increased engagement, appeal to visual learners and shared experience among students.
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Teachers: Should you use business tactics for happier classrooms?

Teachers: Should you use business tactics for happier classrooms? | Future of education | Scoop.it

Applying 7 actions gleaned from successful business practices could help students and teachers excel in the classroom.

In recent years, school leaders have debated what, if anything, schools can glean from the way businesses are run. Should schools be managed like business organizations? And to what extent?

Now, three educator-researchers are sharing their findings on the topic as they wonder if classroom teachers can use successful, proven business strategies to run their classrooms better and increase both student happiness and engagement.

Kelly Kosuga at Alpha Public Schools, Rebecca Weissman and Linda Rogers at Redwood Heights Elementary School, and the advisory team at Khan Lab School, identified highly-regarded business organizations and identified strategies that successful managers in those organizations use to create positive cultures and productivity.

Three common strategies emerged: empowering teams and avoiding micromanagement, being great coaches, and emphasizing accountability.

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A Teacher's New Best Friend: Amazon Inspire | Edudemic

A Teacher's New Best Friend: Amazon Inspire | Edudemic | Future of education | Scoop.it
In the same way as many other industries, education has begun to fully embrace the digital movement. Educational technology, or “EdTech,” not only allows teachers to create more innovative classes, it’s giving students everywhere much easier access to the educational materials they need.

Up until now, the giants in EdTech have included Apple, Google, and Microsoft, which collectively sold 10.8 million devices to primary and secondary schools last year. But software is becoming more important than hardware in digital learning, and the latest company to employ this idea is Amazon, with its new platform “Amazon Inspire.”

Amazon Inspire is a marketplace of free resources for teachers and educational institutions. This new platform, released in beta on June 27, enables teachers to drive Amazon’s “commitment to making digital classrooms a reality” by augmenting its already impressive catalog of resources. When educators sign up, they can upload, download, and edit digital educational materials for the classroom such as lesson plans, teaching modules, and worksheets.
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Noam Chomsky on the Perils of Market-Driven Education

Noam Chomsky on the Perils of Market-Driven Education | Future of education | Scoop.it
Free higher education could be instituted without major difficulties, but neoliberalism is standing in the way.
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Please stop entertaining my kid — I want him to be bored

Please stop entertaining my kid — I want him to be bored | Future of education | Scoop.it
Every time I take my son out in public, there's a screen aimed at him. But I'd rather he learn to entertain himself
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What Pokémon Go Means for Education

What Pokémon Go Means for Education | Future of education | Scoop.it
Beyond being at the heart of Pokémon Go, augmented reality may emerge as a game changer in the field of education.

Via Peter Mellow
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Addressing Digital Inequality in Education

Addressing Digital Inequality in Education | Future of education | Scoop.it
The thoughtful placement of technology in our education environments can greatly enhance the way students learn and educators teach. As we all know, it’s possible for students to partake in mobile and distance learning, to access a plethora of remote resources from anywhere on any device, and to extend learning beyond the classroom.

However, with any movement or shift towards digitization comes the creation of a digital divide. Not providing comparable access to all members of the community has severe consequences. Equitable access to resources, content, and experts is essential, especially when talking about the education of the future members of our society.
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The Pros and Cons of Technology in the Classroom | Edudemic

The Pros and Cons of Technology in the Classroom | Edudemic | Future of education | Scoop.it
Educational technology has its pluses and minuses. It’s up to teachers, administrators, and district personnel to decide whether the good outweighs the bad.
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7 Critical Skills For the Jobs of the Future

7 Critical Skills For the Jobs of the Future | Future of education | Scoop.it

1. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

We spend so much time teaching students how to answer questions that we often neglect to teach them how to ask them. Asking questions—and asking good ones—is a foundation of critical thinking. Before you can solve a problem, you must be able to critically analyze and question what is causing it. This is why critical thinking and problem solving are coupled together.

Wagner notes the workforce today is organized very differently than it was a few years ago. What we are seeing are diverse teams working on specific problems, as opposed to specific specialties. Your manager doesn’t have all the answers and solutions—you have to work to find them.

Above all, this skill set builds the very foundation of innovation. We have to have the ability to question the status quo and criticize it before we can innovate and prescribe an alternative.

2. Collaboration Across Networks and Leading by Influence
3. Agility and Adaptability
4. Initiative and Entrepreneurship
5. Effective Oral and Written Communication
6. Assessing and Analyzing Information
7. Curiosity and Imagination


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32 Great Educational Websites for Teachers

32 Great Educational Websites for Teachers | Future of education | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
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Mindfulness in the Classroom: Does It Work?

Mindfulness in the Classroom: Does It Work? | Future of education | Scoop.it
In most schools across the country, you are likely to find students practicing mindfulness. But what affects are these programs having?
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Get students learning by MAKING quizzes instead of TAKING quizzes.

Get students learning by MAKING quizzes instead of TAKING quizzes. | Future of education | Scoop.it
QuizPedia is a fun and engaging learning tool that can be used in primary education and onwards. And it’s free! How is it different to a typical quiz making tool? Quizzes aren’t new to the classroom but QuizPedia’s approach is. We flip the tables and transfer the task of making quizzes from teachers to students.…
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When We Don't Cultivate Our Most Gifted Students -

When We Don't Cultivate Our Most Gifted Students - | Future of education | Scoop.it
When I was in primary school it was recognized that I finished my schoolwork quickly. The school was well prepared for high achievers, and once a week a small group of us would be shipped off to a special class to challenge our minds. The other children called it “square school,” and we were ridiculed for our abilities.

Personally I shrugged off the taunts, as the chance to learn from a university mathematics professor, or to try new tasks, was enthralling. I didn’t have to escape to a fantasy world whilst I waited for the other students to catch up, and this time was my favorite part of the school week.

However when I hit high school, the school I attended was not as well prepared. I quickly became bored with achieving perfect marks with little effort. I was forced to re-learn the algebra I had already studied whilst being accelerated in primary school. My potential was not being tested. So I looked for new experiences elsewhere.
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Bored Out of Their Minds

Bored Out of Their Minds | Future of education | Scoop.it
For two weeks in third grade, I preached the gospel of the wild boar. My teacher, the sprightly Mrs. DeWilde, assigned my class an open-ended research project: Create a five-minute presentation about any exotic animal. I devoted my free time before bedtime to capturing the wonders of the Sus scrofa in a 20-minute sermon. I filled a poster as big as my 9-year-old self with photographs, facts, and charts, complete with a fold-out diagram of the snout. During my presentation, I shared my five-stanza rhyming poem about the swine’s life cycle, painted the species’ desert and taiga habitats in florid detail, and made uncanny snorting impressions. I attacked each new project that year — a sketch of the water cycle, a history of the Powhatan — with the same evangelism.

Flash forward to the fall of my senior year in high school, and my near-daily lunchtime routine: hunched over at a booth in Wendy’s, chocolate Frosty in my right hand, copying calculus worksheets from Jimmy and Spanish homework from Chris with my left while they copied my notes on Medea or Jane Eyre. Come class, I spent more time playing Snake on my graphing calculator than reviewing integrals, more time daydreaming than conjugating verbs.

What happened in those nine years? Many things. But mainly, like the majority of my fellow Americans, I fell victim to the epidemic of classroom boredom.
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Why Nurturing Student Creativity is Essential (and 7 Ways to Do It)

Why Nurturing Student Creativity is Essential (and 7 Ways to Do It) | Future of education | Scoop.it

In our travels, we’ve asked educators all over the world about the most important skills kids need to thrive in life beyond school. It’s pleasing to see that nurturing student creativity is very high on that list. In fact, it’s number 2, directly below problem-solving. But why is it so important, and how do we ensure we are letting students exercise these abilities in ways that will serve them—and the world—in the future?
Robyn Ewing AM and John Nicholas Saunders have this to say about creativity’s essential place in modern learning. This comes from their article Why Pushing Creativity Out Of Classrooms Will Stop Children Succeeding in the 21st Century, featured on The Guardian:
“As any passionate teacher will tell you, it is possible for education to nurture key skills such as critical thinking, collaboration, problem-solving, imagination, communication, agility, and empathy. And, as many studies will tell you – or perhaps even your own experience as a student or parent – the common path to nurturing these skills is to foster fun, play, and creativity in the classroom.”
As you can see, creativity is a lot like a compound muscle movement; exercising it benefits many different areas at once. To the above list, we might also add things like abstract reasoning, design thinking, cultural awareness—the list goes on. But, you get the idea.

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Finland Will Become the First Country in the World to Get Rid of All School Subjects

Finland Will Become the First Country in the World to Get Rid of All School Subjects | Future of education | Scoop.it
The head of the Department of Education in Helsinki, Marjo Kyllonen, explained the changes:
“There are schools that are teaching in the old-fashioned way which was of benefit in the beginning of the 1900s — but the needs are not the same, and we need something fit for the 21st century.“
Instead of individual subjects, students will study events and phenomena in an interdisciplinary format. For example, the Second World War will be examined from the perspective of history, geography, and math. And by taking the course ”Working in a Cafe," students will absorb a whole body of knowledge about the English language, economics, and communication skills.
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A Teacher's New Best Friend: Amazon Inspire | Edudemic

A Teacher's New Best Friend: Amazon Inspire | Edudemic | Future of education | Scoop.it
Amazon Inspire is a marketplace of free resources for teachers and educational institutions. What does this mean for the future of online learning?
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What Schools Are Learning From the Rapid Rise and Fall of Pokémon Go

What Schools Are Learning From the Rapid Rise and Fall of Pokémon Go | Future of education | Scoop.it
At the start of every school year, Diane Levin, an education professor at Boston’s Wheelock College who teaches a course called “Meaning and Development of Play,” has her students interview people of different ages about how they used to play when they were children. The results are not surprising: Every year, her students report that interview subjects over age 50 played outside all day in big groups of their peers, with a few toys (“maybe a ball”) and no adult supervision. People between the ages of 20 and 40, who grew up in the 1980s, ‘90s, and early 2000s, watched a lot of television but still played outside, often make-believe games inspired by TV shows and movies.

For young people today, however, it’s a different story. “They hardly play. If they do play it’s some TV script. Very prescribed,” Levin said. “Even if they have friends over, it’s often playing video games.”
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8 digital skills we must teach our children

8 digital skills we must teach our children | Future of education | Scoop.it
The digital content they consume, who they meet online and how much time they spend onscreen – all these factors will greatly influence children’s development.
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How Kids Learn Resilience

How Kids Learn Resilience | Future of education | Scoop.it
In recent years, the idea that educators should be teaching kids qualities like grit and self-control has caught on. Successful strategies, though, are hard to come by.
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