Librarians in the...
Follow
Find tag "Wikipedia"
1.2K views | +0 today
Librarians in the real world
Resources and tools to support the work of school libraries.
Curated by Deborah Welsh
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Deborah Welsh from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

Have Your Teachers Banned Wikipedia? They Must Not Know About This.

Have Your Teachers Banned Wikipedia? They Must Not Know About This. | Librarians in the real world | Scoop.it
Wikipedia's most common sources of information are news outlets, books, and academic archives. So if your teacher has banned Wikipedia, just follow Wikipedia's trail of sources to get to the good stuff. Oh, and don't tell them we sent you.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Deborah Owen's curator insight, May 7, 2013 8:12 AM

Hmmm... Worth knowing about. Still can't cite it, but a good place to start for background info.

Sarah Rach-Sovich's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:06 AM

A great starting point - track it back to see where it might have come from.

Lorena Swetnam's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:43 AM

Teach students and teachers how Wikipedia can be a starting point in the research process, not the final destination. 

Rescooped by Deborah Welsh from Learning space for teachers
Scoop.it!

Turnitin - What's Wrong with Wikipedia?

Turnitin - What's Wrong with Wikipedia? | Librarians in the real world | Scoop.it

Educators are well aware of the shortcomings of relying on crowd-sourced content for authoritative information, yet the fact that Wikipedia continues to reign supreme as a top match in Turnitin suggests that students don't see things the same way. In short, what constitutes "research" for students today has come to mean "Googling."


Via Dennis T OConnor, Allan Shaw, Deborah Welsh
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 28, 2013 12:19 PM

This page includes an archive to a webcast on this topic.

Allan Shaw's curator insight, February 28, 2013 10:32 PM

Gaining access to turnitin's resources is a little clunky but worth it. The webinar is 30 minutes long and worth the time. The related SEER resource is also good.