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Getting Started with Primary Source Research for Teachers and Students

Getting Started with Primary Source Research for Teachers and Students | Librarian | Scoop.it
The National Archives Digital Classroom: Primary Sources, Activities and Training for Educators and Students.

Via Gust MEES, Dennis T OConnor, Lourense Das
lfredric's insight:

Excellent links for research  LF

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 17, 2013 5:19 PM

Check it out!!!

 

Lourense Das's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:04 AM

Useful overview of resources, tools, activities and more [in English] related to USA education, but also interesting for others

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Photos For Class - The quick and safe way to find and cite images for class!

Photos For Class - The quick and safe way to find and cite images for class! | Librarian | Scoop.it
The World’s easist way to search for safe, creative commons images and cite them.

Via Jon Samuelson
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Introduction to Twitter - 22/08/2016

Introduction to Twitter - 22/08/2016 | Librarian | Scoop.it
22 August, 5:00 PM - Williamson County Public Library System - Franklin - United States - Learn about Twitter, what it is, how it works, and how you can use it to your advantage personally or for you

Via Tennessee Library Association
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Kids gain confidence in reading

Kids gain confidence in reading | Librarian | Scoop.it
An 8-week pilot program called Reading Roundup was designed to combat summer learning loss, and help 6- and 7-year-olds with learning to read.

Via Tennessee Library Association
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Free Technology for Teachers: Google Forms Can Now Automatically Grade Quizzes Without an Add-on

Free Technology for Teachers: Google Forms Can Now Automatically Grade Quizzes Without an Add-on | Librarian | Scoop.it

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Information is Our Game - Librarians Being Awesome

Librarians Being Awesome Video Wins National Awards

 A promotional video created by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries has won two national awards. 

 Librarians Being Awesome won the award for Best Performance at the Association of Research Libraries Film Festival in Vancouver, Canada, on April 26. UT’s entry was selected for the top performance award out of 57 films submitted by 36 universities. Librarians Being Awesome also was recognized by the Library Leadership and Management Association as an excellent example of electronic advocacy materials. The UT Libraries will be presented with a PR Xchange Award at the American Library Association’s annual conference in June. Librarians Being Awesome is just what it sounds like—but in this instance the librarians were captured on film giving their best athletic performances. The video was the capstone to the Libraries’ “Information Is Our Game” sports-themed marketing campaign. The campaign began with trading cards (like baseball cards) for each librarian. One side of each trading card pictures a librarian on the baseball field, the tennis court—even the Vols’ locker room. The verso is the librarian’s curriculum vitae. The trading cards were followed by several whimsical videos depicting librarians pitted against top-notch athletes. The good humored librarians lost every contest. But, of course, the videos were really touting the librarians’ prowess as information professionals. The entire marketing campaign was meant to convey a simple message: there is a designated librarian with subject expertise in your field of study. Some of UT’s librarians are in fact accomplished athletes, so the capstone video features athletically gifted library faculty and staff just being awesome. The video even features clips of the dean of libraries juggling and an associate dean twirling a baton. The award-winning video has been viewed thousands of times on YouTube and as a “bumper” (a brief ad that runs before the main feature) on the UT campus’ free movie streaming channel. -- Martha E. Rudolph Information Specialist Marketing & Communication University of Tennessee Libraries

Via Tennessee Library Association
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A Taxonomy Tree: A Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Graphic

A Taxonomy Tree: A Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Graphic | Librarian | Scoop.it
A Taxonomy Tree: A Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Graphic by TeachThought Staff If you're a TeachThought reader, you know that thought is a
Via Karen Bonanno
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Check out the action verbs and weave them into student activities.

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Melissa Williams's curator insight, April 3, 9:08 PM

Check out the action verbs and weave them into student activities.

Melinda Miller's curator insight, April 4, 7:45 AM

Check out the action verbs and weave them into student activities.

Judith Morais's curator insight, April 5, 7:42 AM

I just love this layout of the good ol' classic. Its inspired me to keep it on hand again as I plan for the terms Intensive Language unit. Check out the action verbs and weave them into student activities.


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27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students

27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students | Librarian | Scoop.it

Innovative thinking in students will flower when we design classrooms that absolutely can’t survive without it. Same with critical thinking, self-direction, creativity, and so on. Until we reach that point, it’s on the shoulders of the classroom teacher to tease it out of students through a combination of inspiration, modeling, scaffolding, and creating persistent opportunity.


Via Karen Bonanno
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jessica puopolo's curator insight, May 25, 5:20 AM
Share your insight
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4 Ways to Promote Growth Mindset in Project-Based Learning

4 Ways to Promote Growth Mindset in Project-Based Learning | Librarian | Scoop.it
By Bonnie Lathram -- Reflection and sustained inquiry are hallmarks of project-based learning. These ideas connect deeply to building a growth mindset.
Via Karen Bonanno
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 Lessons Learned About Kiddle

 Lessons Learned About Kiddle | Librarian | Scoop.it

Kiddle - a visual search engine for kids, powered by editors and Google safe search. Not a Google product!


Via Mary Reilley Clark
lfredric's insight:

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 26, 6:15 PM

Share with your Elem peeps!

Brenda Rogers's curator insight, March 6, 4:11 PM

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:


The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
***Update****
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 

So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
Susanne Sharkey's curator insight, March 7, 7:39 AM

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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Slides Carnival

Slides Carnival | Librarian | Scoop.it
Find free presentation templates and focus on communicating your ideas. Use these free template designs to give your audience a memorable experience.

Via Jon Samuelson
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Animaker, Make Animated Videos for free

Animaker, Make Animated Videos for free | Librarian | Scoop.it
Animaker is an online do-it-yourself (#DIY) animation video maker that brings studio quality presentations within everyone's reach. Animated Videos, Done Right!

Via Jon Samuelson
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The Future Belongs to the Curious: How Are We Bringing Curiosity Into School?

The Future Belongs to the Curious: How Are We Bringing Curiosity Into School? | Librarian | Scoop.it
What is curiosity? The word is associated with the irregular form of the Latin verb cura, which can mean worry or care about or cure. The word closest in meaning is inquisitive, which also has a La...

Via Joyce Valenza
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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, November 23, 2015 8:20 AM

A perfect reminder researched and argued by Jackie Gerstein.

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6 Super Geeky Tech Tips for the New School Year: The Daring Librarian

6 Super Geeky Tech Tips for the New School Year: The Daring Librarian | Librarian | Scoop.it

Via Karen Bonanno
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Future Ready Librarians - Future Ready Schools

Future Ready Librarians - Future Ready Schools | Librarian | Scoop.it
An essential component to becoming Future Ready, is making a digital learning plan before purchasing technology. The Interactive Planning Dashboard offers districts a five-step collaborative planning process. Upon completion, districts have a complete digital learning implementation plan, full of research-based strategies, including stakeholder input, local context, and district team leadership responsibilities.

Via Lourense Das
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Lourense Das's curator insight, August 24, 6:30 AM
Are schools and librarians ready for the future? Check out this site with video and factsheets to prepare yourself and your role in student success
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9 Fun Tools For Teaching Kids To Code - InformationWeek

9 Fun Tools For Teaching Kids To Code - InformationWeek | Librarian | Scoop.it
Young people should learn to code. Young people should also have fun. Here are nine systems, programs, and websites that will help you help them do both.
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Web tools to support inquiry-based learning

Inquiry-based learning is an active learning process, based on identifying relevant questions to research so that the student can develop knowledge about or create solutions to issues and problems.

Web tools allow students to engage in collaborative and interactive learning. All phases of inquiry learning can be adequately addressed through a wide variety of web-based tools and applications.


Via Karen Bonanno
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Katrina Lehman's curator insight, February 21, 2014 6:39 AM

Web-based applications enhancing learning: Web 2.0 meets inquiry- based learning.

TWCLibrary's curator insight, August 5, 2014 6:15 PM

updated list

Tricia Adams's curator insight, August 10, 2014 9:23 AM

Useful resources

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Free Technology for Teachers: Who Owns Antarctica? - A Political Geography Lesson

Free Technology for Teachers: Who Owns Antarctica? - A Political Geography Lesson | Librarian | Scoop.it
RT @rmbyrne: Who Owns Antarctica? - A Political Geography Lesson via Free Technology for Teachers - Who owns ... https://t.co/n9yPCoyWc7
Via Karen Bonanno
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Transforming Unused School Spaces Into Something Amazing

Transforming Unused School Spaces Into Something Amazing | Librarian | Scoop.it
With staff vision and student and community engagement, turn the unused or under-used areas of your school buildings or grounds into gardens, labs, and makerspaces.
Via Karen Bonanno
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15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching

15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching | Librarian | Scoop.it
15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Mission Possible-7th Grade Orientation

Mission Possible-7th Grade Orientation | Librarian | Scoop.it

I used a PowToon template to make a short introduction for my 7th grade orientation. Since most of them are returning students, I wanted to make it fast, and I didn't want to talk as much. I print out numbered instructions, with plenty of roles for students who don't volunteer for the big jobs, or who are new to the school. Here are my instructions.  


I will show this short video, hand out the instructions, then use this Bruno Mars parody, as the video in the instructions, since they didn't see it as 6th graders. 


Via Mary Reilley Clark
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Feel free to use, share or modify!

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Tamara Martin's curator insight, September 7, 2015 9:07 PM

Fabulous!  thanks.

Marcia Kochel's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:38 AM

Fun idea for an active library orientation. This could be fun for the Freedom to Read elective to make something like this for 5th graders to do.

Sandra Carswell's curator insight, September 8, 2015 11:16 AM

Thank you Mary Clark!

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6th Grade Speed Dating Genres

6th Grade Speed Dating Genres | Librarian | Scoop.it

We're speed dating this week. Several 6th grade teachers want their students to explore different fiction genres. I decided to make some personal ads (pictured above) for different genres or subgenres. I already had resources lists in Destiny for these genres, so it made it easy. We have eleven tables, which we'll load with books and an ad. Students will have to rotate through at least 4 tables. They'll be discussing genres in class, but I made an exit ticket so I can track which are the most popular (I still have one more book order to place.) If you're interested, here's a link to the ads, and a link to the exit ticket. The ads document has the titles listed separately at the end, to make it easier for my aides to cut them out! :)


Via Mary Reilley Clark
lfredric's insight:

Feel free to use or modify!

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Sarah Scholl's curator insight, March 29, 3:54 PM

Feel free to use or modify!

Margareta's curator insight, April 1, 9:55 AM

Feel free to use or modify!

Margareta's curator insight, April 1, 9:56 AM

Feel free to use or modify!

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Curiosity Machine

Curiosity Machine | Librarian | Scoop.it
How do children succeed? With curiosity, creativity, and persistence. Start building with Curiosity Machine.

Via Jon Samuelson
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Video Backgrounds and Free Motion Backgrounds

Video Backgrounds and Free Motion Backgrounds | Librarian | Scoop.it
Free Video Backgrounds and animations for use in any video editing project. No registration required!

Via Jon Samuelson
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102 of the Most Inspiring Storytelling Quotes of All Time

102 of the Most Inspiring Storytelling Quotes of All Time | Librarian | Scoop.it
February 2, 2016 Stories have been shared in every culture for millions of years – starting with rudimentary drawings by people who lived in caves – as a means of.. read more

Via José Carlos, Joyce Valenza
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