MyComplexity
25 views | +0 today
Follow
MyComplexity
complexity
Curated by LeungTong
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Biosystems SI: Patterns in Evolution

Biosystems SI: Patterns in Evolution | MyComplexity | Scoop.it

The papers collected in this issue, present concrete approaches for understanding pattern formation in the evolutionary process and suggest mathematical models to describe the emergence of reproducible patterns of variation.


Biosystems
Volume 123, Pages 1-114 (September 2014)
SI :Patterns in Evolution

Edited by Abir Igamberdiev and Alexei Sharov


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

The Logic of the Physics of Information

A consensus is emerging that the multiple forms, functions and properties of information cannot be captured by a simple categorization into classical and quantum information. Similarly, it is unlikely that the applicable physics of information is a single classical discipline, completely expressible in mathematical terms, but rather a complex, multi- and trans-disciplinary field involving deep philosophical questions about the underlying structure of the universe. This paper is an initial attempt to present the fundamental physics of non-quantum information in terms of a novel non-linguistic logic. Originally proposed by the Franco-Romanian thinker Stéphane Lupasco (1900–1988), this logic, grounded in quantum mechanics, can reflect the dual aspects of real processes and their evolution at biological, cognitive and social levels of reality. In my update of this logical system—Logic in Reality (LIR)—a change in perspective is required on the familiar notions in science and philosophy of causality, continuity and discontinuity, time and space. I apply LIR as a critique of current approaches to the physical grounding of information, focusing on its qualitative dualistic aspects at non-quantum levels as a set of physical processes embedded in a physical world.


The Logic of the Physics of Information
Joseph E. Brenner

Information 2014, 5(3), 389-403; http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/info5030389


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Cities as complex adaptative systems. Luis Bettencourt

http://youtu.be/vp6eKjQHNl0

Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Towards a Self-Regulating Society

Towards a Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20

Via Complexity Digest
more...
Anne Landreat's curator insight, June 17, 2014 7:12 AM

Vers une société auto-régulée. En Anglais.

Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

The Strange New Science of Chaos - YouTube

A 1989 program, with Lorenz


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complexity Digest
more...
Vasileios Basios's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:43 AM

Wow! such a rare delightful material .... Ralph Abraham and Lorenz who could imagine!

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:31 AM

to be watched by the new generations!  old certitudes and new doubts?

Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 19, 2014 9:56 PM

Great to hear Lorenz

Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Zipf's Law for All the Natural Cities around the World

Two fundamental issues surrounding research on Zipf's law regarding city sizes are whether and why Zipf's law holds. This paper does not deal with the latter issue with respect to why, and instead investigates whether Zipf's law holds in a global setting, thus involving all cities around the world. Unlike previous studies, which have mainly relied on conventional census data, and census- bureau-imposed definitions of cities, we adopt naturally and objectively delineated cities, or natural cities, to be more precise, in order to examine Zipf's law. We find that Zipf's law holds remarkably well for all natural cities at the global level, and remains almost valid at the continental level except for Africa at certain time instants. We further examine the law at the country level, and note that Zipf's law is violated from country to country or from time to time. This violation is mainly due to our limitations; we are limited to individual countries, and to a static view on city-size distributions. The central argument of this paper is that Zipf's law is universal, and we therefore must use the correct scope in order to observe it. We further find that this law is reflected in the distribution of cities: the number of cities in individual countries follows an inverse power relationship; the number of cities in the first largest country is twice as many as that in the second largest country, three times as many as that in the third largest country, and so on. 

 

Zipf's Law for All the Natural Cities around the World
Bin Jiang, Junjun Yin, Qingling Liu

http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.2965


Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 14, 2014 5:32 AM

This is a problem almost a century old, Zip's law was formulated in the 40's with English words.

Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Chaos, Complexity, and Public Policy

Irene Sanders Executive Director and Founder of the Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy and author of "Strategic Thinking and the New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, and Change."

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXxs-JtvkkQ


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:09 PM

A way cool panel discussion.  I wish I could be a full practitioner of this new, empirically based governing and political strategic thinking.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:34 AM

Loving these new video resources for understanding complexity and it applications.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 23, 2014 9:16 PM

are our politicians aware of these concepts?

Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Epidemics on social networks

Since its first formulations almost a century ago, mathematical models for disease spreading contributed to understand, evaluate and control the epidemic processes.They promoted a dramatic change in how epidemiologists thought of the propagation of infectious diseases.In the last decade, when the traditional epidemiological models seemed to be exhausted, new types of models were developed.These new models incorporated concepts from graph theory to describe and model the underlying social structure.Many of these works merely produced a more detailed extension of the previous results, but some others triggered a completely new paradigm in the mathematical study of epidemic processes. In this review, we will introduce the basic concepts of epidemiology, epidemic modeling and networks, to finally provide a brief description of the most relevant results in the field.

 

Epidemics on social networks
Marcelo N. Kuperman

http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.3838


Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 9, 2014 5:10 AM

A good review about epidemic models in social networks, SIS, SIR, etc ...

Marco Valli's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:08 AM

Basics of SIS/SIR models of spreading epidemics, and their relations to social networks.

Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Computer science: The learning machines

Three years ago, researchers at the secretive Google X lab in Mountain View, California, extracted some 10 million still images from YouTube videos and fed them into Google Brain — a network of 1,000 computers programmed to soak up the world much as a human toddler does. After three days looking for recurring patterns, Google Brain decided, all on its own, that there were certain repeating categories it could identify: human faces, human bodies and … cats.

Google Brain's discovery that the Internet is full of cat videos provoked a flurry of jokes from journalists. But it was also a landmark in the resurgence of deep learning: a three-decade-old technique in which massive amounts of data and processing power help computers to crack messy problems that humans solve almost intuitively, from recognizing faces to understanding language.


http://www.nature.com/news/computer-science-the-learning-machines-1.14481


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Next civilization: countering complexity and extreme events

Dirk Helbing Next civilization: countering complexity and extreme events. TEDx Martigny 2013/09/26

Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:44 PM

You should listen to this somehow strange speach, strange, perhaps exotic, but very wise and visionary.

John Symons's comment, January 19, 2014 1:58 PM
Dirk needs to read Oskar Morgenstern.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Time Reborn: a new theory of time - a new view of the world

Is it possible that time is real, and that the laws of physics are not fixed? Lee Smolin, A C Grayling, Gillian Tett, and Bronwen Maddox explore the implications of such a profound re-think of the natural and social sciences, and consider how it might impact the way we think about surviving the future.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Have We Evolved to Be Nasty or Nice?

It is futile to ask whether people are naturally cooperative or selfish. They can be either, depending on the circumstances. Dr. Helbing cites "tragedies of the commons" where open access to a common-pool resource such as a fishery tends to result in overfishing that harms everybody—a sort of extended real-world version of the prisoner's dilemma.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Cities as complex adaptative systems. Luis Bettencourt

http://youtu.be/vp6eKjQHNl0

Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Towards a Self-Regulating Society

Towards a Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20

Via Complexity Digest
more...
Anne Landreat's curator insight, June 17, 2014 7:12 AM

Vers une société auto-régulée. En Anglais.

Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Managing Complex Systems Based on Self-Regulation

Managing Complex Systems Based on Self-Regulation. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaD6xPM3AJI&index=2&list=UUYrlsSzinJN42rKmFlOOYxA


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, June 9, 2014 9:30 AM

It's also important to remember that complex systems are frequently larger than the observed and observable universe, such that there may be factors which create self-regulated systems.  A government is apart of the same social system as an economy and, through SOME forms of oversight and regulation can overcome the "boom and bust" cycles of the laissez-faire operated economy.  It's a question of honestly coordinating with the private companies, especially in the financial field, in order to get the best outcomes that they wouldn't really do on their own for the sake of small "self" and short term profit that does not consider social and environmental factors.  Yes, it may seem redundant and silly at times.  But it seems that the background noise of a system, the static, plays as important a role in producing the ultimate sound that is achieved within the social system as does the actual sound of the system itself.  You have to oversee the background noise as well as the main tune in order to achieve the clearest and most consistent sound according to our own social logics and our own social tastes.

 

Economically, it's technically all the same stuff.  Economics is much more of a technical field than foreign policy, which is also more technical than social policy.  All three play a role in producing optimal well being within a given society and in all three there are better and worse options for handling things.  It's as if economics gives the architecture and structure of the society itself through its interaction with the natural laws of economic physics and government/corporate policy (the structure of a house, for example), while social policy is the decoration of the house, internally and externally, while foreign policy is how your society interacts with its neighbors.  Within each house is a variety of different people, and they together form the basis of the social family within the given government's jurisdiction.  Politics, history and the outcomes of the economic, social and foreign policies influences the internal dynamics amongst the neighbors, thus giving life to the house that is intangible, yet very much apart of the universe, for better and for worse.  While there are no right or wrong answers, per se, there are definitely better and worse options that are available with regards to how things play out in the empirical world.  Some people's brains are better at sensing how the empirical world actually works and are able to perceive and willing to work with the natural laws of the universe, rather than trying to go their own way and, essentially, attempt to fly in the face of the impossible and hold out for the extremely improbable without having alternatives available to follow through on.  There is no freedom in this universe; you either obey the natural laws and physics, both inside of and outside of our social worlds, or else you're driven off and/or die.  I do not know how it is that people still go for the technically impossible or suboptimal for the sake of a belief, ideology or inkling within their brains that does not match the way the universe actually works.

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Social Evolution: New Horizons

Cooperation is a widespread natural phenomenon yet current evolutionary thinking is dominated by the paradigm of selfish competition. Recent advanced in many fronts of Biology and Non-linear Physics are helping to bring cooperation to its proper place. In this contribution, the most important controversies and open research avenues in the field of social evolution are reviewed. It is argued that a novel theory of social evolution must integrate the concepts of the science of Complex Systems with those of the Darwinian tradition. Current gene-centric approaches should be reviewed and complemented with evidence from multilevel phenomena (group selection), the constrains given by the non-linear nature of biological dynamical systems and the emergent nature of dissipative phenomena.

 

Social Evolution: New Horizons
Octavio Miramontes, Og DeSouza

http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.6267


Via Complexity Digest
more...
june holley's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:31 AM

Fascinating article suggesting a new evolutionary theory that recognizes the critical importance of cooperation and mutualism.

Jose Ali Vivas's curator insight, May 3, 2014 9:56 AM

Cooperation is a widespread natural phenomenon... sure!

Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Initial Conditions

Initial Conditions | MyComplexity | Scoop.it

What better way can there be to discuss the nature of time than sitting down with two eminent theoretical physicists in the timeless beauty of Vieques, at the western end of the Spanish Virgin Islands? Alan Guth, who first proposed the theory of cosmic inflation, and Sean Carroll, cosmologist and popular science communicator (and also a member of the board of Nautilus), are currently working together, in collaboration with Caltech grad student Chien-Yao Tseng, on a paper explaining the arrow of time. Watch as they walk us through some of the basic ideas.


http://nautil.us/issue/9/time/initial-conditions


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, visit http://imaginationtoolbox.org ).


Via Lorien Pratt, Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 1, 2014 4:50 AM

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, FAIPM, CPPE's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Special issue: What is reality? - New Scientist

Special issue: What is reality? - New Scientist | MyComplexity | Scoop.it
The more we learn about reality, the less we understand it. Our special collection of articles explores how we define reality, what it could be and whether it exists

Via FastTFriend, Complexity Digest
more...
FastTFriend's curator insight, December 21, 2013 5:39 AM

 But what is reality? The more we probe it, the harder it becomes to comprehend. In the eight articles on this page we take a tour of our fundamental understanding of the world around us, starting with an attempt to define reality and ending with the idea that whatever reality is, it isn’t what it seems.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, January 8, 2014 11:55 AM

Dream about this question....

Rescooped by LeungTong from Papers
Scoop.it!

Scale-free power-laws as interaction between progress and diffusion

While scale-free power-laws are frequently found in social and technological systems, their authenticity, origin, and gained insights are often questioned, and rightfully so. The article presents a newly found rank-frequency power-law that aligns the top-500 supercomputers according to their performance. Pursuing a cautious approach in a systematic way, we check for authenticity, evaluate several potential generative mechanisms, and ask the “so what” question. We evaluate and finally reject the applicability of well-known potential generative mechanisms such as preferential attachment, self-organized criticality, optimization, and random observation. Instead, the microdata suggest that an inverse relationship between exponential technological progress and exponential technology diffusion through social networks results in the identified fat-tail distribution. This newly identified generative mechanism suggests that the supply and demand of technology (“technology push” and “demand pull”) align in exponential synchronicity, providing predictive insights into the evolution of highly uncertain technology markets.

 

Scale-free power-laws as interaction between progress and diffusion
Martin Hilbert

Complexity
Early View

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cplx.21485


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

The magic of Fibonacci numbers

Math is logical, functional and just ... awesome. Mathemagician Arthur Benjamin explores hidden properties of that weird and wonderful set of numbers, the Fibonacci series. (And reminds you that mathematics can be inspiring, too!

Via Jorge Louçã, Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Big Brains. Small Films. Benoît Mandelbrot, The Father of Fractals | IBM

IBM and http://IBMblr.Tumblr.com celebrate the life of Benoit B. Mandelbrot, IBM Fellow Emeritus and Fractal Pioneer. In this final interview shot by filmmaker Erol Morris, Mandelbrot shares his love for mathematics and how it led him to his wondrous discovery of fractals. His work lives on today in many innovations in science, design, telecommunications, medicine, renewable energy, film (special effects), gaming (computer graphics) and more.


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LeungTong from Talks
Scoop.it!

Time Reborn: a new theory of time - a new view of the world

Is it possible that time is real, and that the laws of physics are not fixed? Lee Smolin, A C Grayling, Gillian Tett, and Bronwen Maddox explore the implications of such a profound re-think of the natural and social sciences, and consider how it might impact the way we think about surviving the future.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.