Let's Get Sex Positive
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Everybody poos, everybody screws; get over it. Maybe get turned on by the screwing part. ;) http://www.sex-kitten.net/blog/
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Creepy & Complex Sexual Discussions Regarding David Bowie

Creepy & Complex Sexual Discussions Regarding David Bowie | Let's Get Sex Positive | Scoop.it
It wasn’t until David Bowie passed that I heard about how he had slept with an underage girl.

At the age of 15, Lori Mattix was a self-described groupie in the 70s ~ a groupie who lost her virginity to David Bowie. Last November, in an interview at the Thrillist, the adult Mattix seemed fine about it. Even when Thrillist reporter Michael Kaplan pressed her about it, she seemed dreamily happy, gushing, “Who wouldn’t want to lose their virginity to David Bowie?”

Mattix’s stories of her groupie years, deflowering, and age have varied over the years ~ which is not stated here to cast doubt on her claims, but to point out that she clearly hasn’t viewed her sexual activities with Bowie (or others) to be rape or anything remotely close to it. But, as told in the Thrillist piece, Mattix was a minor and Bowie was not. So even with Mattix agreeing and desiring to have sex with Bowie, her age removes her legal ability to consent. This would make Bowie guilty, ethically if not legally, of statutory rape.

Yes, I know; we all took David Bowie’s death pretty hard. But I’m not posting this about Bowie per se…. I mean, sure, there are definitely implications and conversations we should be having regarding celebrities and abuse. And we do have some consumer power we can wield. But the real issues I am looking at in this conversation are the rights of young people to have any sexual autonomy, who decides who is victimized, and how autonomy and victimization impact one another.
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James Deen’s Alleged Assaults Were Ignored, Laughed Off by Casts and Crews #sexwork #porn #rape

James Deen’s Alleged Assaults Were Ignored, Laughed Off by Casts and Crews #sexwork #porn #rape | Let's Get Sex Positive | Scoop.it
Since Saturday, when porn actress and writer Stoya tweeted that she was raped by porn hero James Deen, four more adult film performers have come out agains
Gracie Passette's insight:

Cauterucci's article gives the most balanced view of the whole James Deen rape story ~ including the debacles facing women in porn and sex work. While the adult industry has a much faster (and positive) response to its stars who rape and abuse than Hollywood and mainstream media do, there are always the following issues of whether or not it is rape if a person is paid or likes rough sex. 


Cauterucci:


"There is nothing wrong or rape-like about enjoying rough sex and being good at it. There is nothing wrong or suspicious about acting out a consensual rape fantasy. But, as in offscreen/noncommercial sex, the entire validity of porn as an industry hinges on consent. Perversely, that may be one reason why a porn actress might feel compelled to stay silent about these kinds of violations: Women who act in adult films are often portrayed as victims with little agency or know-how, who must resort to a demeaning and dangerous career because they have no other options. Stories like the ones Fires, Lux, Rayne, and Peters tell—important as they are—don’t exactly contradict that myth.


But neither porn nor rough sex subjected these women to sexual assault, and they didn’t turn James Deen into a rapist. The allegations against Deen are full of references to ways porn actresses control their own careers: through lists of acts they won’t perform, lists of people they won’t perform with, and contracts that specify exactly what will happen in a scene. Deviating from the agreed-upon variety, timing, and manner of sex is just as wrong as any other kind of assault. The women who’ve told their horrifying stories about Deen know that. Deen and the bystanders who looked on and laughed did, too."


Click links for more info on rape & rape fantasies ~ including issues in porn & sex work.

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Gracie Passette's curator insight, December 2, 2015 6:33 PM

Cauterucci's article gives the most balanced view of the whole James Deen rape story ~ including the debacles facing women in porn and sex work. While the adult industry has a much faster (and positive) response to its stars who rape and abuse than Hollywood and mainstream media do, there are always the following issues of whether or not it is rape if a person is paid or likes rough sex. 


Cauterucci:


"There is nothing wrong or rape-like about enjoying rough sex and being good at it. There is nothing wrong or suspicious about acting out a consensual rape fantasy. But, as in offscreen/noncommercial sex, the entire validity of porn as an industry hinges on consent. Perversely, that may be one reason why a porn actress might feel compelled to stay silent about these kinds of violations: Women who act in adult films are often portrayed as victims with little agency or know-how, who must resort to a demeaning and dangerous career because they have no other options. Stories like the ones Fires, Lux, Rayne, and Peters tell—important as they are—don’t exactly contradict that myth.

But neither porn nor rough sex subjected these women to sexual assault, and they didn’t turn James Deen into a rapist. The allegations against Deen are full of references to ways porn actresses control their own careers: through lists of acts they won’t perform, lists of people they won’t perform with, and contracts that specify exactly what will happen in a scene. Deviating from the agreed-upon variety, timing, and manner of sex is just as wrong as any other kind of assault. The women who’ve told their horrifying stories about Deen know that. Deen and the bystanders who looked on and laughed did, too."

Click links for more info on rape & rape fantasies ~ including issues in porn & sex work.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 2, 2015 7:27 PM

[url=/u/606125 x-already-notified=1]Gracie Passette[/url]'s comments:


Cauterucci's article gives the most balanced view of the whole James Deen rape story ~ including the debacles facing women in porn and sex work. While the adult industry has a much faster (and positive) response to its stars who rape and abuse than Hollywood and mainstream media do, there are always the following issues of whether or not it is rape if a person is paid or likes rough sex. 


Cauterucci:


"There is nothing wrong or rape-like about enjoying rough sex and being good at it. There is nothing wrong or suspicious about acting out a consensual rape fantasy. But, as in offscreen/noncommercial sex, the entire validity of porn as an industry hinges on consent. Perversely, that may be one reason why a porn actress might feel compelled to stay silent about these kinds of violations: Women who act in adult films are often portrayed as victims with little agency or know-how, who must resort to a demeaning and dangerous career because they have no other options. Stories like the ones Fires, Lux, Rayne, and Peters tell—important as they are—don’t exactly contradict that myth.


But neither porn nor rough sex subjected these women to sexual assault, and they didn’t turn James Deen into a rapist. The allegations against Deen are full of references to ways porn actresses control their own careers: through lists of acts they won’t perform, lists of people they won’t perform with, and contracts that specify exactly what will happen in a scene. Deviating from the agreed-upon variety, timing, and manner of sex is just as wrong as any other kind of assault. The women who’ve told their horrifying stories about Deen know that. Deen and the bystanders who looked on and laughed did, too."


Click links for more info on rape & rape fantasies ~ including issues in porn & sex work.

TheBodyHouse.biz's curator insight, December 4, 2015 12:08 AM

For God's sake... It's never ok to punch a woman in the face and take her from behind... even if she's a paid porn star. Even if she literally... asks you for it.

 

It doesn't matter that this happened on the set of a porn flick. This incident springs from the generalized notion that it's excusable to treat a woman abusively because you are a more powerful and dominant male. Get over yourselves!

 

I see this attitude (and often experience it) everywhere. It's the attitude whereby men believe women have been put on this Earth to serve them.


Men feel entitled to us. This leads to a sense of ownership. I'm not sure where this comes from (The Bible maybe?) but it has got to END.


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Jian Versus the CBC

Jian Versus the CBC | Let's Get Sex Positive | Scoop.it

The problem when you jump to defend the accused is it ends up making the accuser or victims feel like they’ve just been assaulted all over again. That’s easier to stomach when you can say “But HEY, they’re not coming forward, so they can’t be serious.” No, it’s you who can’t be serious. You can’t hear the accused’s spin-cycle and then make your decision then and there — but so many of you already have.


I’m getting ahead of myself. Let’s look at this from all the angles.

Gracie Passette's insight:

And on the flip side...

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Stop Calling It A Sex Scandal

Stop Calling It A Sex Scandal | Let's Get Sex Positive | Scoop.it

Dear media: Learn the difference between abuse and sex -- otherwise, you're sensationalizing violence and rape

 

 

 

 

 

 

by MARY ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, salon.com

 

Let me fix this for you, headline writers. When you’re dealing with a story that involves rape or harassment or abuse or molestation or child porn or anything that falls under the rubric of criminal behavior, you should call those things rape and harassment and abuse and molestation and child pornography. You know what you shouldn’t call them? Sexy sexy sex scandals, that’s what.

 

For example, when you’re covering a story involving charges of “rape, aggravated sexual contact and multiple counts of aggravated sexual assault” at the Lackland Air Force Base, you might want to reconsider framing it, as the Washington Post does, as a “widening sex scandal,” or as the Boston Herald calls it, a“growing sex scandal,” or even, as the Christian Science Monitor says, a garden-variety “sex scandal.” If you happen to say, as the AP does, that the “Air Force says 31 victims so far in sex scandal,” or as already credibility-strained CNN declares, that there are now “31 victims identified in widening Air Force sex scandal,” please note that word “victims” there. It’s the important one.

 

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Curated by Gracie Passette
The Valiant Gnostic Of Sexuality

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