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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:18 PM

Makes you think about the political and economic influences on just about anything. What time or day it is is an important element to a global economy. Know when business deals can be made in an instance knowing what standards are most efficient can alter systems of dating. That is why instead of having a straight line the line is jutting out in spots. Usually we think of our time zones being dependent on where the sun in relation to our location but in this instance we see that it is merely a man made line that can be altered. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 1:06 PM

This is to me the coolest geographic location in the World... A group of islands nation located in both the south and north hemispheres and also to both the east and west of the international time line zone.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 2015 8:06 PM

500 birthdays were taken away due to an international date line. In Samoa is in a confused state between the united states and the Asian pacific side of the timeline which would cause time and dates to be confusing.Dynamic economic networks and political allegiances have created a very difficult situation for the people near the border in Samoa.  The International Date line in Samoa is something that is needed to be watched and paid attention because it can affect people in ways that can be very significant even at a small tiny rate.

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Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City

Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it
In a bid to reconcile strict gender-segregation laws with a desire to increase employment opportunities for women, Saudi Arabia is planning to construct a new industrial "city" exclusively for female workers, Russian news agency RT reports.

 

The idea is mind-blowing to say the least.  More women would be able to be a part of the workforce and move freely about women-only cities in Saudi Arabia than they could in 'regular' cities. 

Question to ponder: would the implementation of this idea represent a cultural step forward for Saudi Arabia towards gender equality or would it be a step that further isolated women and is repressive?  What do you think of the idea given the ingrained gender norms of Saudi Arabia? 


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Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 1:09 AM

I can see how this might sound appealing, but this isn't the right solution. On the one hand, the women would be able to enter the work force more so as to close the disparity between women who are unemployed. That gap is actually huge since the article mentioned the number of Saudi women who work is somewhere in the low teens despite the fact that "60%" of college graduates are women. At the same time, this environment might prove to be more freeing for women in regards to their movement as well. As the article mentioned women always have to be "accompanied by a male," which is just ridiculously restricting.

 

Yet all of these benefits come at the price of isolation. That whole "separate, but equal" thing played out in the US and it wasn't actually equality. Nor did it actually make for a harmonious environment. In order to actually change people's minds, the government can't just push the women workers out of site in a corner.Without men being around women workers, they will continue to treat them poorly as second class citizens. Furthermore,separating them almost makes it seem like they are second class thereby exacerbating the gender norms within the country even more. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:49 AM

This women only city policy, has a lot in common with the racial segregation polices in the United States. In 1896, in Plessy v Ferguson the Supreme Court ruled that as long as the facilities for whites and blacks were equal, segregation was constitutionally permissible. The idea that facilities can be separate and equal is a fallacy. The dominate group will always be provided with the better facilities , because they have the economic and the social means to build a better facility. The less group will suffer do to a lack of political and economic means. This women only city will likely pale in comparison to the other cities of Saudi Arabia. True equality comes through integration, not separation.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:20 PM

this would 100% be a step back, that is the worst kind of segregation and "equality" did we not have this in the united states and it was scrapped shortly after because "separate is inherently not equal"

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How The USA Expanded (In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF) | Edudemic

How The USA Expanded (In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF) | Edudemic | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

Got 30 seconds and want to see exactly how the country now known as the U.S. expanded across the continent? Ever wish you could see all that in one simple animated GIF? Me neither.

Until I saw this.


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US History Teachers Blog: Civil War Battles

US History Teachers Blog: Civil War Battles | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it
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London, the Olympics and Geography

London, the Olympics and Geography | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

The Geographical Association has produced numerous resources specifically for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games being held in London.  The Olympics as an event work as an important teaching moment that operates on numerous scales.  What local developmental projects reshaped the urban fabric of London in preparation for these Games?  Do international events such as the Olympics foster a global community?  Is this idea of a global community perfectly harmonious?    


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Teaching High School Psychology: Race is Real

Teaching High School Psychology: Race is Real | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

The American Anthropology Association has create a look at race through three lenses: history, human variation, and lived experience.


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Waves of violence

Waves of violence | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it
An interactive guide to drug crime in Mexico Drugs in Mexico Related deathsCartel areasTraffic routes...

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Year-End Roundup | Social Studies, History, Geography and Civics

Year-End Roundup | Social Studies, History, Geography and Civics | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it
Our lessons are on summer vacation, but here are our social studies-related lesson plans for the 2011-12 school year.

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The Civil War

The Civil War | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

Graphs and maps to visualize battles, victories, casualties of the Civil War. You can toggle to individual battles, as well.


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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."


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Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 17, 2012 7:38 AM
Just a short note to say thank you for all your great 'scoops'; I rescoop almost everything and really enjoy getting your updates!
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Mr. Ferlazzo's U.S. History Classes Blog

Mr. Ferlazzo's U.S. History Classes Blog | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

Great resources from a well connected and respected US H Teacher

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The Living Room Candidate Admaker

Gain an understanding of political advertising from the creators' perspective by re-editing a commercial from a historic presidential campaign or creating one using historical footage and your own video, images, and sounds. Register to save, share, and download your finished ad.


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What do our state taxes pay for?

What do our state taxes pay for? | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

If you add up the revenue from state taxes in Wisconsin (income, sales, corporate, gasoline, etc) ,where does the money go?

 

This is produced by @AndyRFeldman and I found it via @APHumanGeog, via @GrandmaWat   Ha!  The joys of the Twitterverse!

 


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Americans put to shame by immigrants on sample civics test

Americans put to shame by immigrants on sample civics test | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

Could  you plass the naturalization test?  Only 65% of native-born Americans could get the required six out of 10 right answers on a sample of a civics test given to immigrants.


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The Living Room Candidate Admaker

Gain an understanding of political advertising from the creators' perspective by re-editing a commercial from a historic presidential campaign or creating one using historical footage and your own video, images, and sounds. Register to save, share, and download your finished ad.


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The Battle of Gettysburg - The United States Army

The Battle of Gettysburg - The United States Army | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it

Flash map and audio on the Battle of Gettysburg.  


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Obama vs Romney - Decide Who Wins!

Obama vs Romney - Decide Who Wins! | Lessons for the Classroom | Scoop.it
Click on each state in the map with your predictions, and the running total at the bottom will tell you who wins!

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