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E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities
Lern- und Moderationsmethoden & didaktische Modellen für Online Lern- und Arbeitsprozesse
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Erika Orians & The Power of Notifications | Schoology Blog

Erika Orians & The Power of Notifications | Schoology Blog | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

I have gotten so many positive comments from students on how they like getting homework update and email reminders. Students also love the fact that they can email me a question, I immediately get a text notifying me of the message, I reply back, and the student has his/her answer within five minutes. Some nights I’m practically chatting live with students.

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I also found the class email feature has been amazing for sharing upcoming writing contests. Usually when I posted these things on the wall, students would forget about it or never visit the contest website for more information. Also, many are shy and won’t come to me for more information. I have had so many more students actually participate in these contests just for the fact that he/she can send me emails for help outside of class.

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Before I conclude this blog, I have one important recommendation when using the notifications feature. Please be mindful of what time you, the teacher, are updating class information or posting assignments. Some school nights I would be up until midnight working and posting information to Schoology.

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flexible learning sequence for your online course

flexible learning sequence for your online course | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
How to create a "design blueprint" with a flexible learning sequence for your online course?
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Design your Digital Classroom - A wonderful interactive chart!

Design your Digital Classroom - A wonderful interactive chart! | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

Click on the small circle next to Slideshow to view a linear presentation of the big concepts OR click on the small circle associated with each idea to view more information and find resources on my wiki.

 


Via Susan Bainbridge
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Susan Bainbridge's comment, June 7, 2012 1:21 AM
Hi Enrique, Isn't this a great chart? Glad you enjoyed it also.
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Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org

Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
.The connectivist theory describes learning as a process of creating connections and developing networks. It is based on the premise that knowledge exists out in the world, rather than inside an individual’s mind. Connectivism sees the network as a central metaphor for learning, with a node in the network being a concept (data, feelings, images, etc.) that can be meaningfully related to other nodes. Not all connections are of equal strength in this metaphor; in fact, many connections may be quite weak.

On a practical level, this approach recommends that learning should focus on where to find information (streams), and how to evaluate and mash up those streams, rather than trying to enter lots of (perishable) information into one’s skull. Knowing the pipes is more important than knowing what exactly each pipe contains at a given moment.
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Martin Ebner - Gedanken zu Learning Analytics

Vortrag im Rahmen der OPCO 12 Veranstaltung zu Learning Analytics

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auf SLideshare:
www.slideshare.net/mebner/gedanken-zu-learning-analytics

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http://portal.tugraz.at/portal/page/portal/TU_Graz/Studium_Lehre/tugnet_vl_start

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Project-Based Learning Professional Development Guide

Project-Based Learning Professional Development Guide | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
This guide is organized into six sections:

Introduction
Why Is PBL Important?
What Is PBL About?
How Does PBL Work?
Via Katy Foster
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The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions — Help Me Find More | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions — Help Me Find More | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

May 23, 2012 by Larry Ferlazzo

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/about/articles-ive-written/

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Asking the right questions is an essential part of effective teaching and learning. A reader recently asked me if I had a specific “The Best…” list on the topic, so I thought it would be a good idea to bring together several of my related posts and other articles together.

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I hope readers will offer additional suggestions.

You might also be interested in:

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The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2009/05/25/the-best-resources-for-helping-teachers-use-blooms-taxonomy-in-the-classroom/

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The Best Resources On Teaching & Learning Critical Thinking In The Classroom

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2011/11/04/the-best-resources-on-teaching-learning-critical-thinking-in-the-classroom/

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The Best Resources For Teaching “What If?” History Lessons

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2012/05/19/the-best-resources-for-teaching-what-if-history-lessons/

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Here are my choices for The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Questions:

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Are we asking the right questions? is from The Boston Globe.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2012/05/19/just-ask/k9PATXFdpL6ZmkreSiRYGP/story.html?camp=id

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Making Thinking Visible is from John Hopkins University.

http://education.jhu.edu/newhorizons/strategies/topics/thinking-skills/visible/index.html

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Several Ways To Teach Critical Thinking Skills is one of my Education Week columns

http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/classroom_qa_with_larry_ferlazzo/2011/11/response_several_ways_to_teach_critical_thinking_skills.html

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Beyond Competence: It's the Journey to Mastery That Counts by Marc J. Rosenberg : Learning Solutions Magazine

Beyond Competence: It's the Journey to Mastery That Counts by Marc J. Rosenberg : Learning Solutions Magazine | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

Via Mayra Aixa Villar, juandoming
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Flipping Blooms Taxonomy | Powerful Learning Practice

Flipping Blooms Taxonomy | Powerful Learning Practice | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

Via Ove Christensen, João Greno Brogueira, Elena Elliniadou
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Big Dog, Little Dog: ADDIE is the Scavenger of Instructional Design, Not the Bitch Goddess (or Blooming Beyond Bloom)

Big Dog, Little Dog: ADDIE is the Scavenger of Instructional Design, Not the Bitch Goddess (or Blooming Beyond Bloom) | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

When ADDIE was first handed over to the U.S. Armed Forces it was a linear model. However, after working with it they found that they needed a more dynamic model, so they adapted it. They mastered the tool rather than become a slave to it.

http://nwlink.com/~donclark/history_isd/addie.html#dynamic

 

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For some reason instructional designers love building ADDIE into a goddess that orders them to build crappy learning platforms. For example, they pronounce that it only builds courses when the real fact is that it tells you to use a course only if a simpler method, such as a performance support tool or OJT, will not work.

http://bdld.blogspot.com/2011/10/addie-does-more-than-classrooms.html

 

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From its inception, ADDIE was designed to be a lean, mean, instructional design machine. This leanness has fooled others into thinking that it is a universal model that can build strip malls and skyscrapers. Nope! ADDIE has specific steps that are strictly designed for learning. This has led others to believe that ADDIE is too lean, that it tells them what to do, but not how to to it. But as Merriënboer noted, you can add other components on to it when needed

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3. Marzano's New Taxonomy

In The Need for a Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy, Marzano describes six levels:

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Level 6: Self-system
Level 5: Metacognitive System
Level 4: Knowledge Utilization (Cognitive System)
Level 3: Analysis (Cognitive System)
Level 2: Comprehension (Cognitive System)
Level 1: Retrieval (Cognitive System)

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It is made up of three systems and the Knowledge Domain. The three systems are the Self-System, the Metacognitive System, and the Cognitive System. When faced with the option of starting a new task, the Self-System decides whether to continue the current behavior or engage in the new activity; the Metacognitive System sets goals and keeps track of how well they are being achieved; the Cognitive System processes all the necessary information, and the Knowledge Domain provides the content (see ftp://download.intel.com/education/Common/in/Resources/DEP/skills/marzano.pdf).

What are your replacements for Bloom's Taxonomy?

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Alternative’s to Kirkpatrick: Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method

Alternative’s to Kirkpatrick: Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
As learning experience designers (aka instructional designers aka performance improvement consultants), we constantly try to improve upon our own processes. Are we meeting the needs of our learner...
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5 Reasons Why Metaphors Can Improve the User Experience

5 Reasons Why Metaphors Can Improve the User Experience | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
There are many ways to experience the world around us. Especially offline, we can make use of our different senses to collect information, interpret our environment and make judgments.

On the Web, however, our senses are more limited. As designers, we need to present information carefully to make sure our users think, feel and do the right thing.


A great way to help your users understand abstract content, create a sense of familiarity, trigger emotions, draw attention and motivate action are metaphors.

"The way we think, what we experience, and what we do every day is very much a matter of metaphor."  
- Lakoff and Johnson
In their frequently cited book, Metaphors We Live By, Lakoff and Johnson demonstrate the important role of metaphors in our language and in our everyday lives. Our conceptual system is largely metaphorical, which means that we use metaphors to reason and understand the world.

Let’s look at how you can use metaphors to add to the user experience on your website. Below are five reasons why metaphors can improve the user experience.
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The 1-minute guide to teachers’ concerns about mLearning – e-moderation station

The 1-minute guide to teachers’ concerns about mLearning – e-moderation station | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
Senden an Twitter
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Senden mit E-mail program
Senden an Delicious
Senden mit Gmail
Hinzufügen zu LinkedIn
Hinzufügen zu Reddit
Senden an StumbleUpon
Hinzufügen zu Google Bookmarks
Drucken mit PrintFriendly

Photo by maiak.info
This post is a follow-up to my blog post ‘The 1-minute mLearning panel summary’. (You can watch the IATEFL Glasgow panel discussion here). That post dealt with the panel’s responses to questions from the chair (Lindsay Clandfield). This follow-up post summarises the issues brought up by the audience at this same panel event. These issues reflect, I think, (some) general concerns that educators have about the implementation of mobile learning. Below I’ve summarised some of the views of the panel, and added my own at points.
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Group Work, Discussion Strategies to Manage Online Instructor Workload | Faculty Focus

Group Work, Discussion Strategies to Manage Online Instructor Workload | Faculty Focus | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
Shrinking budgets and increasing enrollments are putting online instructors in the position of teaching larger classes. Accommodating more students means rethinking how you teach your courses. Otherwise your workload can quickly become overwhelming.

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Creating effective group work experiences requires work up front on the part of the instructor, including selecting appropriate projects for collaboration, considering group dynamics, and setting expectations. Restine says that when group work fails, it is “because we’ve simply gone in and said, ‘Go work in a group.’ That’s just a perfect recipe for a disaster because everyone thinks they know how to work in a group, but the reality is that very few people actually do.”

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When poorly planned, group work can actually increase the instructor’s workload due to confusion and having to help students work through group processes. This is why it’s essential that groups operate within a set of ground rules. Restine offers suggestions but does not impose any particular group work model on students. “I give a couple of models of group ground rules, but I require my groups to come up with their own unique set of ground rules.

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The Learning Styles and eLearning

The Learning Styles and eLearning | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
Everyone learns differently, though there are three main style categories people tend to fall into; do you incorporate these styles when developing your presentation?
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The eLearning Industry Blog: Implementing the "Five Moments of Need" Model Using Performance Support Platforms

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New Pedagogies For the Digital Age | Edudemic

New Pedagogies For the Digital Age | Edudemic | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

eLearning 3.0 Characteristics

1. Distributed Learning

2. Enhanced Mobile Technology

3. Collaborative Intelligent Filtering

4. 3D Visualization and Interaction

 

Read more:

http://edudemic.com/2012/05/new-pedagogies-for-the-digital-age/

 


Via Ove Christensen, Gust MEES, Jenny Smith
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Feedback as Dialogue

Presentation at the Society for Research into Higher Education conference.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Projektlernen, PBL, John Deweys’ Methodology . Wiederentdeckungen in Zeiten des Web 2.0 -> Lerngesellschaft

Projektlernen, PBL, John Deweys’ Methodology . Wiederentdeckungen in Zeiten des Web 2.0 -> Lerngesellschaft | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it

Projektlernen, PBL, John Deweys’ Methodology – dies sind Wiederentdeckungen in Zeiten des Web 2.0, seitdem klar ist, dass eine neue Art des Lernens außerhalb der formalen Bildung in den Institutionen von Schule, Hochschule und Weiterbildung immer mehr an Bedeutung gewinnt.

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Nicht mehr diskutiert werden muss auch, dass das reduktionistische Lernkonzept der Industriekultur, das ausschließlich systematisches „akademisches“ Buchlernen historisch prämiert hat, längst überholt und das Festhalten daran verantwortlich für das Scheitern der Bildungsinstitutionen auf allen Ebenen ist – gemessen an deren Funktion, die Kompetenzen/das Wissen individuell und gesellschaftlich zu bilden, die nötig sind, um die historischen Aufgaben der Menschheit des 21. Jahrhunderts bewältigen zu können.

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Von welcher Art wird dieses Lernen 2.0 als Operationsweise der Kultur des digitalen Zeitalters sein?

Die 4 wichtigsten Merkmale dieses Lernens:

Lernen ist selbstbestimmt Lernen ist personalisiert Lernen ist kollaborativ Lernen ist vernetzt


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Active Learning using the Socratic Method | Rethinking Learning - Barbara Bray

Active Learning using the Socratic Method | Rethinking Learning - Barbara Bray | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
Eric Mazur, a Harvard University professor, says learning interests him far more than teaching, and he encourages a shift from teaching to helping students learn.
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How can you engage your students and be sure they are learning the conceptual foundations of a lecture course? In From Questions to Concepts, Eric Mazur introduces Peer Instruction and Just-in-Time teaching — two innovative techniques for lectures that use in-class discussion and immediate feedback to improve student learning. Using these techniques in his innovative undergraduate physics course, Mazur demonstrates how lectures and active learning can be successfully combined. This video is also available as part of another DVD, Interactive Teaching, which contains advice on using peer instruction and just-in-time teaching to promote better learning. For more videos on teaching, visit http://bokcenter.harvard.edu
Via Benjamin Stewart
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Teaching & Learning - Five Habits—Easy but Often Neglected Practices That Improve Outcomes - Magna Publications

Teaching & Learning - Five Habits—Easy but Often Neglected Practices That Improve Outcomes - Magna Publications | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
In teaching college courses, it is easy to forget that little practices can make a difference in better learning and grading. Here are 5 habits to practice.

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Given the daily grind of teaching, it is easy to forget that little practices can make a big difference when the goals are more learning and better teaching. Here is a reminder of five easy habits to practice mindfully ("mindfulness" comes from the Latin word for having a good memory).

Wait - After asking a question in class, most teachers know they need to wait, but they do not accurately perceive how long they wait. Often, in less than a second, they call on someone, pace nervously, or rephrase the question. With mindful practice, teachers can increase wait time to three to five seconds. When they do, more students speak up, they answer more fully, and they ask better questions.
  Kick-start your opening; shout before you walk out - Too many classes fail to start or end with anything memorable. Drama and action can motivate learning in class and after it's over. Kick-start your opening with an especially dramatic example, an unobvious question, the answer to a difficult homework problem, a relevant cartoon, or some intriguing background music. End by having students shout out a one-word takeaway. Or ask the question you'll start with next class.
  Do less and do it more deeply - Imagine a list of 12 course learning objectives, things like learning fundamental principles, acquiring team skills, and developing writing skills. Next, imagine that you must rate each as essential, important, or of minor or no importance. What if you did that but were then challenged to select not more than three to five as essential and important? Most faculty find that difficult to do. All objectives seem essential, despite the fact that when we do more, we often do things less well. A daily plan should include no more than three to five vital takeaways that students will understand, be able to do, or think differently about.
  Grade smarter, not just harder - Many faculty spend lots of time grading. They write comments only to discover that students are making the same mistakes in the next assignment. Feedback often makes no impact. Instead, try returning problem-sets marked only right or wrong, and have students find and correct their errors before points are assigned for the work. Mark one page of a draft paper, noting problems that appear elsewhere in the paper. Challenge the student to correct them for the next revision. Offer feedback that is concrete and specific. Instead of calling something "unclear" guide the student to "expand, explain, and give examples." Sandwich critical comments with strengths: "This letter showed passion and used primary sources thoughtfully. Now have it add an opposing view. That way its passion and thought show fair-mindedness too."
  Mix it up - It's easy to fall into ruts - to use the same pet activities over and over. I'll have my students "write/pair/share" one too many times. I need to place reminders in my planning materials: "Move from pairs to small groups; move from small groups to large ones; then move back to pairs." Not only do we need to use a mix of activities, we need to mix presentation modes (visual, aural, kinetic) so that the content comes to students in a variety of different ways.

Contact Roben Torosyan at rtorosyan@fairfield.edu

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Dossier “Partizipation”

Dossier “Partizipation” | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
#PB21 | Web 2.0 in der politischen Bildung. ein gemeinsames ... Schule als Lernort von Mitgestaltung und Teilhabe; Partizipation für alle; Digitale Partizipationswerkzeuge in der Bildungsarbeit; Partizipation im Zeiten des digitaler Wandels ...
Via Klaus Meschede
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Design Methodologies: Instructional, Thinking, Agile, System, or X Problem?

Design Methodologies: Instructional, Thinking, Agile, System, or X Problem? | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
“Everyone designs who devises courses of action aimed at changing existing situations into preferred ones. The intellectual activity that produces material artifacts is no different fundamentally from the one that prescribes remedies for a sick patient or the one that devises a new sales plan for a company or a social welfare policy for a state.” - Herbert Simon (Nobel Prize Winner & Carnegie Mellon professor)

The table below shows five popular design methodologies (Instructional System Design, Design Thinking, Agile Design, System Thinking, and X Problem). It includes definitions, visual models, primary focus and goals, values, main steps, and further readings. I don't claim these are the absolute parts that make up each design approach as the definitions, goals, primary focuses, and steps may vary greatly from source to source. However, the tables notes the key points that seem to separate them from each other.

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Going from left to right, the models generally are designed for solving semi-structured problems to increasingly ill-defined problems, however, the type of problem and the skills of the designer will generally depict which model might work best for a particular situation. In addition, choosing a primary methodology does not mean you cannot borrow or change processes with another model as you are in control of the design, rather than the methodology being in control—design is both art and science.

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http://bdld.blogspot.de/2012/03/addie-is-scavenger-of-instructional.html


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PechaKucha: presentation format that is based on a simple idea: 20 images x 20 seconds.

PechaKucha: presentation format that is based on a simple idea: 20 images x 20 seconds. | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
Here is a list of things you can use or download. All of these tools were built to help you get the most out of your education.

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PechaKucha Night was devised in Tokyo in February 2003 as an event for young designers to meet, network, and show their work in public.
It has turned into a massive celebration, with events happening in hundreds of cities around the world, inspiring creatives worldwide.

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Drawing its name from the Japanese term for the sound of "chit chat", it rests on a presentation format that is based on a simple idea: 20 images x 20 seconds. It's a format that makes presentations concise, and keeps things moving at a rapid pace.

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Teachers & Web 2.0 – A Beginner´s Guide to Webs 1,2,3, x – e-moderation station

Teachers & Web 2.0 – A Beginner´s Guide to Webs 1,2,3, x – e-moderation station | E-Moderation: aktives Online-lernen mit E-tivities | Scoop.it
Partly it´s due to a lack of training. Even if teachers are using some of these tools themselves they may still not see how exactly they can be integrated into their normal practice. Using technology with students is 10% about the technology (how it works) and 90% about pedagogy (how to use it in a meaningful, effective and useful way).

Web 2.0 fits in well with a communicative, collaborative approach to teaching and learning. If teachers are favouring a transmission approach to learning, then inevitably they will tend towards a Web 1.0 use of technology. If teachers are already using projects and group work in their normal teaching, then integrating Web 2.0 tools does not require a great leap of faith. Or a significant change in already sound practice.
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