Legume-rhizobium root nodule symbiosis
39 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Goon-Bo Kim from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

#PlantSciCurators: dromius

#PlantSciCurators: dromius | Legume-rhizobium root nodule symbiosis | Scoop.it

Sebastian Schornack. Co-discoverer of the TAL effector DNA binding code. Current research focus: plant processes leading to development of symbiosome structures between roots and microorganisms (schornacklab.net)

 

TAL effector science - infos on novel DNA-binding proteins of bacteria and their biotech use

 

Plant Cell Biology and Microscopy - Methods and Tools for Plant Cell Biology


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Goon-Bo Kim from Plant roots and rhizosphere
Scoop.it!

MtZR1, a PRAF protein, is involved in the development of roots and symbiotic root nodules in Medicago truncatula -

MtZR1, a PRAF protein, is involved in the development of roots and symbiotic root nodules in Medicago truncatula - | Legume-rhizobium root nodule symbiosis | Scoop.it

PRAF proteins are present in all plants, but their functions remain unclear. We investigated the role of one member of the PRAF family, MtZR1, on the development of roots and nitrogen-fixing nodules in Medicago truncatula. We found that MtZR1 was expressed in all M. truncatula organs. Spatiotemporal analysis showed that MtZR1 expression in M. truncatula roots was mostly limited to the root meristem and the vascular bundles of mature nodules. MtZR1 expression in root nodules was down-regulated in response to various abiotic stresses known to affect nitrogen fixation efficiency. The down-regulation of MtZR1 expression by RNA interference in transgenic roots decreased root growth and impaired nodule development and function. MtZR1 overexpression resulted in longer roots and significant changes to nodule development. Our data thus indicate that MtZR1 is involved in the development of roots and nodules. To our knowledge, this work provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of a biological role for a typical PRAF protein in plants.


Via Christophe Jacquet
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Goon-Bo Kim from TAL effector science
Scoop.it!

The Regulatory Status of Genome-edited Crops - Plant Biotechnol. J.

Wolt et al, 2015

Genome editing with engineered nucleases (GEEN) represents a highly specific and efficient tool for crop improvement with the potential to rapidly generate useful novel phenotypes/traits. Genome editing techniques initiate specifically targeted double strand breaks facilitating DNA-repair pathways that lead to base additions or deletions by non-homologous end joining as well as targeted gene replacements or transgene insertions involving homology-directed repair mechanisms. Many of these techniques and the ancillary processes they employ generate phenotypic variation that is indistinguishable from that obtained through natural means or conventional mutagenesis; and therefore, they do not readily fit current definitions of genetically engineered or genetically modified used within most regulatory regimes. Addressing ambiguities regarding the regulatory status of genome editing techniques is critical to their application for development of economically useful crop traits. Continued regulatory focus on the process used, rather than the nature of the novel phenotype developed, results in confusion on the part of regulators, product developers, and the public alike and creates uncertainty as of the use of genome engineering tools for crop improvement.


Via dromius
more...
dromius's curator insight, August 13, 2015 10:23 AM

Lists examples of genome editing for value-added traits within economically important crops as well as

Responses of USDA to letters of inquiry regarding the regulatory status of plant phenotypes developed through genome editing