Legal Issues and Copyright Law
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Intellectual Property Is a University’s Best Friend

Intellectual Property Is a University’s Best Friend | Legal Issues and Copyright Law | Scoop.it
Universities should seek to retain control of their copyrights and develop mechanisms to monetize them to ensure the financial health of the institutions. This is a proposal that sides neither wit...

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Maria Robinson's comment, February 13, 2013 5:39 PM
This article is important for teachers, students, and professors at universities because it discusses Open Access (OA) and the movement towards OA. OA is the practice of providing unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles. OA is increasingly being provided to theses, scholarly monographs and book chapters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access). What does this mean? This means that teachers and students will have the ability to research any type of publication they want to do research on and this could be a great opportunity for teachers and students around the world. This article also deals with Intellectual Property (IP), which is creations of the mind, it includes inventions, books, etc. The beginning of this article also deals with a court case over IP and it was Carnegie Mellon Univ. v. Marvell Technology. The university was awarded $1.17 billion by a federal jury in Pittsburgh because the jury found that Marvell Technology Group had sold billions of semiconductors using technology developed by the university without a license.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:39 PM
Again, you followed the directions in discussing the implications of your article, citing a relevant case, and providing your own insights. --Open Access is relevant to the publishing world--and would have a huge financial impact, it does not however, change copyright laws.
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Times Higher Education - Plagiarism problems on campus: where have I heard that before?


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Maria Robinson's comment, February 13, 2013 5:38 PM
This article is important to teachers and even administrators because it shows that students will keep on cheating on their papers, plagiarism, because they won’t get caught, so they will still just keep cheating. This has to deal with copyright law out of the chapter and it is in violation of copyright law. A case that deals with plagiarism is Hill v. Trustees of Indiana University. This case starts with Joseph Hill committed plagiarism in two classes at Indiana University. The professor in the class gave him a failing grade, he was withdrawn from class, and was notified of a plagiarism charge, but the student thought that he was not given due process, so he filed suit in U.S. District court. The District Court dismissed the case because they affirmed that he was given due process.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:41 PM
interesting case, where student did not argue that plagiarism had not happened--but the lack of due process; You can see from this case how every court case involves multiple legal issues.
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Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students Works ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students Works ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Legal Issues and Copyright Law | Scoop.it
Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students Works ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/iMMeRxgCGm via @medkh9

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Rescooped by Maria Robinson from Legal Issues and Copyright Law
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Maryland proposal to claim copyright on students' work prompts backlash, legal review

Maryland proposal to claim copyright on students' work prompts backlash, legal review | Legal Issues and Copyright Law | Scoop.it
A proposal recently floated by the Prince George's County Board of Education would give the government the copyright to anything created by teachers, students and employees before, during and after school hours.  (If this would have been the...

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Maria Robinson's comment, February 13, 2013 5:38 PM
This article is important to teachers and students even if they are not from the state of Maryland. The reason why it is important is because if this piece of legislation gets passed it will allow the Prince George’s County Board of Education to have copyright of anything that is created by teachers, students, and employees made during and after school then it could be passed in your county. The legal principle that is highlighted in this article is copyright violation. I couldn’t find a course case that really dealt with this exact article, but there was a statement from a New York federal appellate court that said, “tests, quizzes, homework problems, and other teaching materials” were works made for hire owned by the district and that the “academic tradition” of granting authors ownership of their own scholarly work cannot be applied to materials not explicitly intended for purchase (Maryland proposal to claim copyright on students' work prompts backlash, legal review).
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:43 PM
I agree, Prince George is within common law rights to claim intellectual property over teachers' works (though how far that arm reaches outside the school is unclear)--yet it can hardly be claimed that students are "work for hire."
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Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students Works ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students Works ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Legal Issues and Copyright Law | Scoop.it
Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students Works ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/iMMeRxgCGm via @medkh9

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