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Are we protecting our profession? Part 1.

Are we protecting our profession? Part 1. | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Dear Colleagues: Every now and then something happens in our profession that makes me wonder if we are truly doing what is best for all of us: individually and collectively as interpreters and translators.  In fact, this happened recently when I learned, like many of you, that the American Translators Association had revisited the antitrust…
interpreter's insight:
Technological advances and the rapid growth of globalization have created a world with uneven realities and circumstances in many fields, including interpreting and translating. When applied today, the rules conceived to protect the weak from the powerful, provide shelter to multinationals like Capita, SOSi, and LionBridge who take advantage, with the blessing of some of our professional associations, of the legal ban to talk about fees and working conditions of professional interpreters and translators who are forced to negotiate with commercial, not professional, entities who take advantage of any circumstance they can use in their favor. 

But it does not need to be that way, a careful reading of the law shows us that discussing fees and work circumstances is legal, as long as there is no agreement to fix a fee.
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Public Service Interpreting in the UK
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PI4J Press Release: Government in denial about quality report

PI4J Press Release: Government in denial about quality report | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
The Government has refused to accept the main recommendations of an independent quality report into how the Ministry of Justice and Capita deliver language services in courts.
Professional Interpreters for Justice, the umbrella group of interpreter organisations, says the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has failed to listen to experts in the field.
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Bitter look, or flattering word? A tour of issues with statutory regulation and an introduction to principled non-compliance

Bitter look, or flattering word? A tour of issues with statutory regulation and an introduction to principled non-compliance | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
I was unable to attend Signature’s statutory regulation meeting in January due to being unexpectedly hospitalised (I’m fine now). While waiting for my belly-button to resume normal service, I did a…
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From the comments: Interesting article. Just to mention another recently regulated profession: chiropractic. Anecdotally, I’ve been told that those registered find that unregistered people just call themselves by a different job title.
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Anna Aslanyan: Shambles in Court

Translation is like rubbish collection: no one notices it until something goes wrong. The need to move from community-based interpreting in the courts to a regulated system became apparent in the early 1990s, after a number of miscarriages of justice. Iqbal Begum was tried in 1981 for killing her abusive husband; poor interpretation meant she didn’t understand the difference between murder and manslaughter. Released on appeal in 1985, she committed suicide a few years later. Her case led to calls for an independent regulatory body, and in 1994, following a recommendation by the Royal Commission on Criminal Justice, the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI) was established.
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LFC striker Roberto Firmino fined and banned over drink driving charge: updates

LFC striker Roberto Firmino fined and banned over drink driving charge: updates | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Interpreter delay

Mr Hogan, defending Mr Firmino, has updated the court - telling the judge we are still waiting for the Portuguese interpreter. The footballer’s agent speaks fluent Portuguese, however, the court can only really use official, court registered interpreters. So for the time being, we are waiting for the next case - which could be any of the other defendants on today’s list. But some of them haven’t turned up yet...so it’s paperwork for the moment.
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NRPSI -Advice for aspiring public service interpreters: an interview with Silvina Katz

NRPSI Practitioner Board member Silvina Katz spoke with Hanna Galindez and Ewa Lison, undergraduates on the Middlesex University BA Hons Interpreting and Translation degree, for their research project. This is an edited transcript of the interview.
interpreter's insight:
These are also challenging times for the public sector. It doesn't have a lot of money and is under increasing pressure to reduce its costs.
However, if you choose to enter the profession and invest time, money and effort in becoming appropriately qualified, then you want to charge and be paid a fee appropriate to your level of professionalism. 
You don't want to, and neither should you, accept the lowest possible pay. I think this is a dilemma for all of us working in the profession today.
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Lost in Translation? Examining the Role of Court Interpreters in Cases Involving Foreign National Defendants in England and Wales

Lost in Translation? Examining the Role of Court Interpreters in Cases Involving Foreign National Defendants in England and Wales | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Abstract

Court interpreters have seldom been featured in studies on the criminal courts. Until recently, cases requiring court interpreters were rare and marginal. The peculiarity and historical rarity of these cases may explain the lack of academic consideration of the work of court interpreters in the criminal justice literature. Rapid demographic changes brought about by mass migration, however, are changing the make-up of criminal justice proceedings, rendering court interpreters key participants and inexorable aides for the everyday running of the criminal justice system. This article examines the increased reliance on interpreters and the nature of their involvement in criminal justice proceedings. It will explore the relationship between interpreters and defendants, on the one hand, and between interpreters, counsels, and judges, on the other. Drawing on empirical data stemming from a research project on foreign national defendants conducted in Birmingham’s criminal courts, we explore issues of trust and reliability underpinning the intervention of court interpreters and the implications of these interventions for the defendant’s case. The use of interpreters aims first and foremost to ensure the defendant’s right to defense. Yet, as we show, their intervention is often propelled or hindered by instrumental, procedural, or logistical reasons, intimately linked to the rapid transformation of the demography of defendants and the privatization of services related to the criminal justice system
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Big headache for thebigword? Language Industry News Roundup | Slator

Big headache for thebigword? Language Industry News Roundup | Slator | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it

Big headache for thebigword?

The GBP 232m (USD 283m) Ministry of Justice interpretation and translation contract is one of the world’s largest language service contracts; and one of the knottiest. Incumbent thebigword, which took over from Capita TI as covered by Slator in November, is already facing negative press because of an incident to which CEO Larry Gould had to respond.

On January 6, 2017, the Daily Mail reported that an interpreter went to the wrong court leading to a sentencing delay, which supposedly cost British taxpayers GBP 10,000 in lawyers’ fees, and so on.

The Law Society Gazette, meanwhile, quoted a statement from Larry Gould, CEO of thebigword, explaining what happened. Gould said thebigword was asked to have an interpreter ready at the Lewes Crown Court on January 6 at 9:30AM, which they did. But the sentencing was actually slated for 2PM at the Hove Crown Court.

He said once they were informed of the different time and venue, they sent an interpreter to Hove Crown Court — but the hearing had been adjourned.

According to the Mail, over 2,600 court cases were adjourned in the past five years due to interpreting service failures. Which leads us to ask, will CEO Gould have to issue a statement to the press each time a court interpreter misses an appointment? That just would not scale.

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Government fee cut blamed for interpreter mistake | News | Law Society Gazette

Government fee cut blamed for interpreter mistake | News | Law Society Gazette | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it

Professional interpreters have blamed government fee cuts for problems that have arisen in courtroom interpreting, following news that sentencing of a man who attacked two police officers with a hammer was delayed because his interpreter went to the wrong court.

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What we learned as Interpreters in 2016.

What we learned as Interpreters in 2016. | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Some European countries, like Spain and the United Kingdom, are under siege by governments that want to lower the quality of translation and interpreting services in the legal arena to unimaginable levels of incompetence.

Interpreters around the world faced attempts from special interest groups to erode our profession by lowering professional standards and creating questionable certification programs, the multi-national language agencies continued to push telephone interpreting whenever, and wherever they can, offering rock-bottom per minute fees to the interpreters.
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Contract between The Big Word and MOJ - a Freedom of Information request to Ministry of Justice

Contract between The Big Word and MOJ - a Freedom of Information request to Ministry of Justice | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
I would like to request a disclosure of the Contract between MOJ and the agency The Big Word, with regards to legal interpreters and translators in England.

Thank you very much.

Yours faithfully,
Emma Nicole Pick
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Restorative justice off the record - Lost in Translation: Interpreting the Polish Penality

Restorative justice off the record - Lost in Translation: Interpreting the Polish Penality | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
I have recently decided to give my doctoral thesis the silent treatment and through this blog post play the devil’s advocate in my own case. I’m afraid this has to sound a bit academic. There is a lot about restorative justice in my thesis. Restorative justice (or simply RJ; translated into Polish as sprawiedliwość naprawcza)…
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Ipswich shoplifter spends two days in custody after trolley dash with groceries worth nearly £600

Ipswich shoplifter spends two days in custody after trolley dash with groceries worth nearly £600 | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Following his arrest at 11.40am, there was no Romanian interpreter available to attend a court hearing until 48 hours later. Therefore, Samok was kept in custody.
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Public Sector: Interpreters:Written question - HL3281

Public Sector: Interpreters:Written question - HL3281
Q Asked by Baroness Coussins Asked on: 16 November 2016
Ministry of JusticePublic Sector: InterpretersHL3281
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to include interpreting in public services within the list of excepted professions in Schedule 1 to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975.

A Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie Answered on: 21 December 2016
The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975 lists areas of activity and proceedings which are exceptions to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (ROA), meaning that the employer or other relevant body is entitled to ask for, and take into account, certain spent cautions and convictions (as well as unspent convictions).
For inclusion within the Exceptions Order, there has to be compelling evidence that there exists an exceptional reason for the disclosure of the spent caution or conviction. For example, where the role involves working with vulnerable people. For the ROA to continue to be effective in achieving its aims of improving access to employment and rehabilitation, exceptions to the Act should only be sought where there is good reason.
The exceptions take into account the role the person is carrying out and not necessarily the profession or job they do (unless it is proportionate to protect all roles in a job or profession). Interpreters in certain public service positions may already be included in the Exceptions Order, for example those working within prisons or those working in certain roles with children or vulnerable adults. It would not be appropriate or proportionate, however, to introduce a blanket provision to cover all such interpreters.

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Ministry of Justice language services contract basic information - a Freedom of Information request to Ministry of Justice

Ministry of Justice language services contract basic information - a Freedom of Information request to Ministry of Justice | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it

1. What was the total procurement cost with regard to the contract with Applied Language Solutions / Capita for language services. 

 2. What was the total procurement cost with regard to the contract with thebigword for language services. 

 3. What was the agreement between the MOJ and the service provider(s) with regard to providers' internet portals, i.e. is it true the taxpayer is paying twice for these portals and that they don't belong to the ministry who is paying for them. What is the rationale for paying for an internet portal to Capita who then owns it and then again to thebigword who in turn owns it. Please provide a copy of it with regard to this point. How much did each of them cost? 

 In your email at 23:31: 

 4. How many notices to improve were served on thebigword since the beginning of the contract. Please provide copies. 

 5. How many interpreters are there correctly qualified in legal interpreting with DPSI Law, DPI, Met Test and BA / MA in interpreting on the register available for the MOJ interpreting jobs. (if the MOJ does not have this information, what is the total number of interpreters on this register) 

 6. How many of the 12010 jobs for the period between 31/10/16-27/11/16 were assigned to these interpreters in (2). 

 7. What was the rationale for tiering interpreters in 2012 and what was the rationale for tiering jobs in 2016 instead. Also, please include definitions for each old interpreter Tiers 1, 2 and 3 and of the standard, complex and written complex jobs now.

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Interpreting fools

Interpreting fools | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it

As a police interpreter I have had over 10 years of practice interpreting for Trump-like personalities. Not everybody I interpret for at the police station is difficult to work with. However, I regularly encounter people who have difficulties stringing a coherent sentence together. Their sentences are punctuated with swear words so often they forget to finish them and lose the plot of what they were trying to say. I am also frequently confronted with people in custody who have challenging personalities, which makes interpreting far more problematic and sometimes distressing.

The main frustration of an interpreter, regardless whether on a diplomatic or a community level, is that when one interprets a fool, one ends up sounding like one too. Professional interpreters at all levels and in all situations should be able to act appropriately and in accordance with their Code of Conduct

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Standards of Service for Victims and Witnesses

Section 2 of the Victims and Witnesses (Scotland) Act 2014 requires Police Scotland, the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service, the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service, the Scottish Prison Service and the Parole Board for Scotland to set and publish standards of service for victims and witnesses.

The common standards of service;

Ensure you have fair and equal access to services throughout and are treated with dignity and respect at all times regardless of background, age, disability, gender, gender reassignment, race, nationality, religion, belief or sexual orientation. Where required, additional support will be provided and any reasonable adjustments made to ensure that you have access to information and support services;
Work together and in partnership with victim and witness support organisations to ensure you are provided with the best service possible;
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Anúncio fala de uma América diferente - Cerveja mexicana Corona responde com anúncio ao slogan de Trump

Anúncio fala de uma América diferente - Cerveja mexicana Corona responde com anúncio ao slogan de Trump | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Cerveja mexicana Corona responde com anúncio ao slogan de Trump

O primeiro país visado pelas ordens de Trump está a ser o México.
Mas a lei do eterno retorno também está a ser a maior cervejeira do país... A Corona é a cerveja importada mais vendida nos Estados Unidos e lançou uma campanha viral que reforça a ideia de que a América é grande. Mas o anúncio fala de uma América diferente de Trump
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Towards the Professionalization of Legal Translators and Court Interpreters in the EU: Introduction and Overview

For, despite the fact that legal translators and interpreters play an essential part in enabling the functioning of multilingual legal orders such as the EU, as well as in court proceedings involving mobile EU citizens, they remain well-nigh invisible. 


Truth be told, one is hardly aware of translators and interpreters, lest an error occurs. Bearing in mind that legal errors in particular can have serious repercussions, since words in courtrooms and legal documents 


Note that the term legal translator and interpreter is used here as an umbrella term including also court interpreter . 


Due to a lack of terminological consistency, many different titles denoting certified or sworn translators who are authorized to designate their translations as legally valid are used within the EU. 


Likewise, there are no legal instruments at the EU level that define the notion of court interpreter or legal translator and interpreter.

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'Murdering scumbags': How did outsourcing get into this mess?

'Murdering scumbags': How did outsourcing get into this mess? | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Outsourcing firms seem to stagger from one scandal to the next, with even their Government paymasters putting the boot in at times. Can they turn their image around?
interpreter's insight:
Opponents of outsourcing perhaps don’t realise how embedded outsourcing is in the British state. While big contractors Capita, Atos, G4S and Serco are the best known, the National Audit Office says that over 200,000 companies and charities provide services to the state. 

These include everything from managing buildings for government and answering phones for police forces, to maintaining the Royal Air Force early-warning base at Fylingdales and running the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston. According to the NAO, total government spending on outsourcing in 2012/13 was £187bn, of which £84bn was spent by local government, £50bn by the NHS, £13bn by devolved and independent bodies, and £40bn by central government. 
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Use of live-link communications technology for interpreters - Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (Codes of Practice) (Revision of Codes C, D and H) Order 2016 - Motion to Approve: 19 Jan 2017: H...

Use of live-link communications technology for interpreters - Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (Codes of Practice) (Revision of Codes C, D and H) Order 2016 - Motion to Approve: 19 Jan 2017: H... | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
The main revision to PACE Code C is to expressly permit the use of live-link communications technology for interpreters. The changes enable interpretation services to be provided by interpreters based at remote locations and allow access to be shared by forces throughout England and Wales. This will avoid interpreters having to travel to individual police stations, and improve the availability of interpreters for all languages. By reducing delays in the investigation, it will enable a more streamlined and cost-effective approach to the administration of justice. The revisions include safeguards for suspects to ensure, as far as practicable, that the fairness of proceedings are not prejudiced by the interpreter not being physically present with the suspect. The provisions therefore require the interpreter’s physical presence unless specified conditions are satisfied and allow live-link interpretation.
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Public Service Interpreting and Translation: Moving Towards a (Virtual) Community of Practice | Érudit | Meta v57 n1 2012, p. 235-247 |

Public Service Interpreting and Translation: Moving Towards a (Virtual) Community of Practice
Danielle D’Hayer
London Metropolitan University, London, UK
d.dhayer@londonmet.ac.uk
Abstract

Following many battles, Public Service Interpreting and Translation (PSIT) is gradually evolving towards professionalisation. Wherever it is practiced, common issues have been identified: defining the profession, providing interpreting services for rare or minority languages, educating stakeholders, moving from training to education, and last but not least interpreting and translation quality. The lack of funding for PSIT courses within the current financial context is forcing stakeholders to work differently. The community of practice model can help PSIT stakeholders share resources and knowledge beyond the traditional boundaries set by courses, schools or countries. New technologies such as virtual conference tools and shared repositories are the essential “missing link” towards the progress of PSIT education. PSIT stakeholders need to join forces and pool efforts towards a constructive and innovative dialogue that would enhance the profession. Some forms of PSIT, such as legal interpreting and translation, have already broken barriers and gained professional recognition. However, PSIT should include all forms of PSIT contexts, including the medical or local government. Finally, once fully defined, PSIT and conference interpreting for spoken and sign languages could finally come together under the Interpreting profession umbrella. This is the achievable ultimate aim when working as communities of practice, small or large, language specific or generic, face to face or virtual.

Key words: PSIT (Public Service Interpreting and Translation), community of practice, remote teaching and learning, situated learning, professionalisation
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Ministry of Justice's ongoing shambolic privatisation of legal interpreting and translation services #MOJFWA #thebigword

Ministry of Justice's ongoing shambolic privatisation of legal interpreting and translation services #MOJFWA #thebigword | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
The case exposes the Ministry of Justice’s shambolic privatisation of legal translation services. MPs and spending watchdogs say a catastrophic shortage of interpreters has made courts rely on Google Translate, a basic and time-consuming online translation service.

More than 2,600 court cases have been adjourned in the past five years because of failures in the interpreting service.
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Ministry of Justice: Translation Services:Written question - 57404

Ministry of Justice: Translation Services:Written question - 57404
Q Asked by Royston Smith(Southampton, Itchen)Asked on: 13 December 2016
Ministry of JusticeMinistry of Justice: Translation Services57404
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the selection criteria were for the contract to provide translation and transcription services for her Department, awarded to thebigword in May 2016.
A Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee Answered on: 21 December 2016
The selection criteria for the contract awarded to Thebigword for translation and transcription services was:
Service Delivery (35% of the total score);
Booking Service and Data Security (25% of the total score);
People and Resources (20% of the total score);
Mobilisation, Transition and Contract Management (10% of the total score); and
Legal, Commercial and Financial (10% of the total score).
The quality and financial criteria were evaluated separately. The Authority set a Quality Threshold and all bids which met or exceeded this threshold proceeded to the final stage of evaluation.
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The Code of Conduct for Court Interpreters

The Code of Conduct for Court Interpreters | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Even if you are not a court interpreter yourself and only work with them, it is a good idea to become familiar with their code of conduct. Knowing what to expect of interpreters in court can help to avoid confusion or bridge divides.

Breaking Down the Interpreters’ Code of Conduct
Codes of conduct for interpreters reflect not only the skills that legal interpreters need to have, but also how they are expected to act, dress and communicate in court.
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CIOL: Public Service Interpreting back in the news following the award of the new MoJ contract

CIOL: Public Service Interpreting back in the news following the award of the new MoJ contract | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Public Service Interpreting back in the news following the award of the new MoJ contract
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REVIEW OF INTERPRETING NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL STANDARDS (NOS) - SURVEY deadline Monday 19.12.2016

REVIEW OF INTERPRETING NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL STANDARDS (NOS) - SURVEY deadline Monday 19.12.2016 | Legal interpreting | Scoop.it
Please take this survey. Your response is important!
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National Occupational Standards review - ALL interpreters, please take part - deadline Monday 19 December. Instructus Skills are reviewing the Interpreting National Occupational Standards (NOS). 
The aim of the review project is to create a revised set of standards which reflect interpreting current practice and the skills and knowledge required by professional interpreters. 
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