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Leadership character: A six-part series by West Point’s Col. Eric Kail

Leadership character: A six-part series by West Point’s Col. Eric Kail | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
We introduce a six-part series written by West Point’s course director of military leadership, Col. Eric Kail.

Via Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

Read Annette's insights. And start with anyone of Lee Thayer's books.

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ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:44 PM

Read Annette's insights.   ozzie Mindfulness.com

ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:45 PM

Read Annette's insights. And start with anyone of Lee Thayer's books.

ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:46 PM

Read Annette's insights. And start with anyone of Lee Thayer's books.

Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations
Lee Thayer has been one of the seminal thinkers in the area of communication.
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Great Leadership Requires Asking Questions

Great Leadership Requires Asking Questions | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

Great leaders are those who instead ask the right questions and engage others to arrive at the best answers together.


Via donhornsby, Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

Lee would simply share: The role of the leader is to be a virtuoso question-asker.  Questions open. Answers close. 


Thanks to Annette Schmeling for sharing from Serving and Leadership.

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 20, 10:10 AM

(From the article) “When a leader asks the questions,” says Wiseman, “they channel the energy and intelligence of their team on the challenge at hand, and they shift the burden of thinking onto others.”

 

Instead of looking to answer the big and important questions on his or her own, the multiplier asks provocative questions of the group and encourages them to work on it together. This engages employees like nothing else and no longer has them sitting on the sidelines awaiting the answer from their leader.

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 20, 12:59 PM

A key is when asking questions is to listen deeply. I read Parker Palmer and use his work in my writing. The key person to question and listen to is one's self. This requires quietness that we do not find in the hectic pace of daily life. It is a meditative space when we listen to our self and to others.

Annette Schmeling's curator insight, March 20, 3:46 PM

Effective questions are those that accomplish their purpose as well as build a positive relationships. Questions that work should build a deeper and better understanding of the problem and possible solutions, but should also construct better working relations among the problem solvers.  Edgar Schein in his book Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling promotes the kind of inquiry that comes from an attitude of interest and curiosity. Inviting others to tell their story in their own words helps to establish rapport, gather information and increase understanding.

 

Humble Inquiry changes the quality of listening from confirming habitual judgments and the focus on the factual/objective data to more empathic and generative listening (Otto Scharmer) and greater humility. My whole being is able to slow down and to be present when I can suspend my judgment and enter into the question at a deeper level. 

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7 Things Smart Learners Do Differently

7 Things Smart Learners Do Differently | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
What makes a real difference in reaching your potential is an ability to be a smart learner. See what smart learners do differently and what they can teach us.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

From my early days with Lee Thayer about 20+ years ago, it has always been about being in the learning mode.  Vistage, formerly known as TEC (The Executive Committee), was one of the many organizations that Lee infected with being in the learning mode as opposed to the knowing mode.  Red Scott would always say: You're green and growing (learning mode) or ripe and rotting (knowing mode).  I added that for many of us we turn to rotting and composting so that we can once again become green and growing.  It's not what I know that gets me in trouble. It's what I know that just ain't so...that does.   ozzie MIndfulness.com

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, February 24, 6:58 AM

These are some useful characteristics of what differentiates smart learners. One of them, hanging around other smart people, is what a Vistage group is all about. The other, is to always be learning.

ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:54 PM

From my early days with Lee Thayer about 20+ years ago, it has always been about being in the learning mode.  Vistage, formerly known as TEC (The Executive Committee), was one of the many organizations that Lee infected with being in the learning mode as opposed to the knowing mode.  Red Scott would always say: You're green and growing (learning mode) or ripe and rotting (knowing mode).  I added that for many of us we turn to rotting and composting so that we can once again become green and growing.  It's not what I know that gets me in trouble. It's what I know that just ain't so...that does.   ozzie MIndfulness.com

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How The Mind Really Works: 10 Counterintuitive Psychology Studies — PsyBlog

How The Mind Really Works: 10 Counterintuitive Psychology Studies — PsyBlog | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Ten psychological findings that challenge our intuitive view of how our minds work.
ozziegontang's insight:

When I follow my heart or emotions, I must remember to take my brain along. I don't learn from my experience: I learn from my interpretation of my experiences.  Practice doesn't make perfect; practice makes permanent. Perfect practice makes perfect.


Lee reminds me: It's not what I know that gets me in trouble: it's what I know that just ain't so that does.


 I use my rationalizations to explain why something happened the way it did or why I did something not realizing the choices I made or that I was not conscious and in a triggered state.


Some things to think about. Getting my thinking right is what Lee continues to share in his writings.

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The Role of Leaders in Helping Others Find Meaning at Work

The Role of Leaders in Helping Others Find Meaning at Work | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

"Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for." - Viktor E. Frankl
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99"Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for." - Viktor E. Frankl
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99

"Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for." - Viktor E. Frankl


Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

Very little to add beyond Mark's insight.


Lee would simply say:  Leaders don't have a vision. They are had by their vision.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, January 22, 8:34 AM

Kim Cameron, in his book Positive Leadership, observes that work is associated with meaningfulness when it has one or more of the following key attributes:

The work has an important impact on the well-being of human beingsThe work is associated with an important virtue or personal valueThe work has an impact that extends beyond the immediate time frame or creates a ripple effectThe work builds supportive relationships or a sense of community in people
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99

Kim Cameron, in his book Positive Leadership, observes that work is associated with meaningfulness when it has one or more of the following key attributes:

The work has an important impact on the well-being of human beingsThe work is associated with an important virtue or personal valueThe work has an impact that extends beyond the immediate time frame or creates a ripple effectThe work builds supportive relationships or a sense of community in people
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99

As leaders, our employees will follow when we have a noble cause--something beyond just making money. This article differentiates a few ways you can do that:

 

1. The work has an important impact on the well-being of human beings

2. The work is associated with an important virtue or personal value

3. The work has an impact that extends beyond the immediate time frame or creates a ripple effect

4. The work builds supportive relationships or a sense of community in people

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Mark Nepo: How to Stay Present in a World of Distractions - Super Soul Sunday - OWN

Subscribe to OWN: http://bit.ly/18Lz0rV Poet and best-selling Mark Nepo says to listen to someone is to be truly present—but it's not always easy to do in a ...

Via Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

As dear friend Annette Schmeling shares:


"Mindless habits sap our energy, steal our time and clutter our life at home & work. It is the never-ending obsession with doing or being good enough. Mark Nepo and Oprah highlight, in the video clip, the limitations of the listening to the constant chatter of the inner critic, our distractions and busyness. Nepo stresses the need to develop the discipline and personal practice of presence."

 

"Being fully present in the here and now creates greater peace, power and harmony. Presence and making genuine, loving contact is not always safe or easy. There is always a risk involved in trying to make a real connection. Being aware of our presence and making small adjustments in our mindless habits will help our lives flow more harmoniously according to our own nature and natural rhythms."


So I remind myself: Am I awake, aware, fully present and living my life intentionally?

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Annette Schmeling's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:46 PM

Mindless habits sap our energy, steal our time and clutter our life at home & work. It is the never-ending obsession with doing or being good enough. Mark Nepo and Oprah highlight, in the video clip, the limitations of the listening to the constant chatter of the inner critic, our distractions and busyness. Nepo stresses the need to develop the discipline and personal practice of presence.

 

Being fully present in the here and now creates greater peace, power and harmony. Presence and making genuine, loving contact is not always safe or easy. There is always a risk involved in trying to make a real connection. Being aware of our presence and making small adjustments in our mindless habits will help our lives flow more harmoniously according to our own nature and natural rhythms. 

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Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today

Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
A conversation with David Thornburg about designing a better classroom
ozziegontang's insight:

The trick is to craft the kinds of questions that require reflection

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How and Why to Be a Leader (Not a Wannabe)

How and Why to Be a Leader (Not a Wannabe) | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

Lead people to their better selves. And start with myself first.

ozziegontang's insight:

Leaders change the world in some way. Often it is radical change. Look at leaders in history. There were no books on leadership. Leaders influence/influenced this person and the next and the next to get out and create the change necessary to alter the world.  The measure of performance is: Performance.


When you think about it, the leader is often identified only after the fact. After the results have been achieved.


Leaders don't have a Vision. They are had by a Vision.


Umair Hague's thoughts on leadership are reflected in the life work of Lee Thayer on Leadership and High Performance Organizations.


Should I want to see what it takes to prepare myself to become a leader should the occasion arise, then I will begin to read the works of Lee Thayer starting with Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing.  Then I must be prepared to challenge myself for the rest of my life.

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Innovative Leadership: It Starts With Words [& Stories]

Innovative Leadership:  It Starts With Words [& Stories] | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Innovation leadership needs to start early. Freshman writing may be as good a place as any.

Via Karen Dietz, ozziegontang
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Sue Peterson's curator insight, May 10, 2013 11:05 AM

It seems to me that good, quality classes should always include at least a bit of the skills discussed in this article - reflection, the ability to find different perspectives, the ability to converse about those differences...but, I guess it is good to have some affirmation from Forbes.  

 

Also an interesting read as I have applied for our University's leadership program for students that provides them with mentors as well as specific opportunities for developing leadership skills.  

ozziegontang's curator insight, May 11, 2013 6:17 PM

Actually it starts with the way that I think. My thinkiandrogen influences who I am. Who I am influences what I do. The writing part comes from my thinking and my being. Reading Lee Thayer's book Leadership Virtuosity would be very helpful in seeing leadership from this aspect and all its many other perspectives.

Linda Allen's curator insight, May 13, 2013 8:51 PM

Excellent!

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Michel Bauwens: Four Scenarios for the Collaborative Economy

Michel Bauwens: Four Scenarios for the Collaborative Economy | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Closing keynote of the OuiShare Fest by Michel Bauwens, founder of the Foundation for P2P Alternatives, who introduces four prospective scenarios for the col...
ozziegontang's insight:

What is my contribution and what future scenarios am I helping to create? How am I reaching out peer to peer (P2P)  to create the future that is for the benefit of all.  See the Kalama Sutra  Leadership is about how I think  influences my being and who I am. Who I am impacts what I do.


We are back to what Lee Thayer shared from the beginning. When had by a purpose that is greater than the individual, the person doesn't have a vision or purpose; rather the vision or purpose has the individual...for the best of mankind.

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Kevindoylejones's curator insight, May 18, 8:30 AM
P2p is the superset of the shareable economy
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'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO

'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Lieutent General William F. Talley, Chief of the U.S. Army Reserve For 30 years, Lieutenant General Jeffrey W.
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ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:12 PM

It is about service to others. Some wonderful insights that General Talley shares to the questions asked.


"I have to get people to think I’m a careful, compassionate, caring leader, and then people will help me do things."


The General's words echo what Lee Thayer has been teaching for over 4 decades to leaders: "The most fundamental lessons is that leadership is about commitment, competence and character."

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Mental Models & The Way We Make Sense of Things | Facebook

Mental Models & The Way We Make Sense of Things | Facebook | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
ozziegontang's insight:

The models of the world that we create based on who we are and what we've experienced and interpreted create the way we look at "our" reality. So in a way I will never know reality; only my interpretation or explanation of my experiences and my thoughts. Guess what. My lense will always be different from yours. 


This piece from Cleveland Clinic touches on why Empathy  is so important. I never know what you are experiencing when I make my judgmental decision of your intentions without knowing...your story.

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If You're Learning, You'll Never Need to Recharge

If You're Learning, You'll Never Need to Recharge | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
In a recent interview I did with the Wall Street Journal, we hit on a wide range of topics: discount programs disguised as loyalty programs; the experiment in human nature that we call Panera Cares;

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

Red Scott said it this way: I'm either green and growing or ripe and rotting.  Lee Thayer continues to talk about and address the difference between being closed when in the knowing mode, and open when in the learning mode.


I added to Red's comment:  If I become ripe and rotting, I can become rotting and composting. When this occurs I can again become Green and Growing.  This is the reason that questions open one and answers close one off. How does one stay in the learning mode for a lifetime?


Thanks to Mark Taylor, fellow Vistage Chair for bringing the article to my attention.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, June 7, 2013 6:37 PM

Sounds like a noble cause

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Why ‘neuroskeptics’ see an epidemic of brain baloney

Why ‘neuroskeptics’ see an epidemic of brain baloney | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
The public and press devour news and books about ‘lit up’ neurons with gusto. Politicians have the bug, too, with Obama and Harper each launching $100-million research plans.
ozziegontang's insight:

Looks like we have moved from pop-psychology to pop-neuroscience. The suggestion is that it might serve us better to learn about neuroscience by "reading the blogs of the Neurocritic, Neuroskeptic and Mind Hacks. ...Those are actual practicing neuroscientists who are experts in their respective fields."


Back to the Kalama Sutra



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Learning to Read Their Minds - Chief Learning Officer, Solutions for Enterprise Productivity

Learning to Read Their Minds - Chief Learning Officer, Solutions for Enterprise Productivity | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

New insights into how the brain works are changing how learning leaders structure programs and how the corporate learning industry thinks about knowledge retention and study habits.

ozziegontang's insight:

While scientists now know more about the brain, it's validating scientifically what our earliest philosophers understood intuitively. They lived and practiced: repeated retrieval, the spacing effect, and deep encoding, Think: knowing my times tables. Or the Roman who held up two fingers and said: Five beers please.


Science is a metaphor for understanding reality.  The truth is that I do not learn from my experiences. I learn from my interpretation of my experiences. Remember that reality is my reality because it is filtered through my mental model. My mental model  is based upon  my interpretation of my unique experiences (that have a great deal in common with many others in the species genus homo.  So we are back to Lee Thayer's: Get my thinking right.


For how I think creates and reflects who I am. Who I am and how i think create what I do.  What I do creates my habits and then in the end my habits create me.  So it is in the doing the right thinking about doing the right actions that creates me. (The Latin verb for the word "do" is: ago/agere, agi, actus.


Think with the end in mind. Or another way of saying it is: Act from the future.


So in one way we live reality while understanding reality by explaining it metaphorically through science. I continually have to be reminded not to mistake the finger pointing at the moon for the moon.


ozzie Mindfulness.com

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Leadership character: A six-part series by West Point’s Col. Eric Kail

Leadership character: A six-part series by West Point’s Col. Eric Kail | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
We introduce a six-part series written by West Point’s course director of military leadership, Col. Eric Kail.

Via Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

Read Annette's insights. And start with anyone of Lee Thayer's books.

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ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:44 PM

Read Annette's insights.   ozzie Mindfulness.com

ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:45 PM

Read Annette's insights. And start with anyone of Lee Thayer's books.

ozziegontang's curator insight, March 4, 4:46 PM

Read Annette's insights. And start with anyone of Lee Thayer's books.

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Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy?

Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy? | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Many leaders inadvertently stand in the way of superior performance. Here’s how to avoid the hindrance trap.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, February 8, 9:10 PM

As Pogo said, we have met the enemy and the enemy is us.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, February 10, 9:53 AM

Leadership is largely about developing your people, setting a vision, and supporting them in making it happen.  But are you hindering that success by not setting clear expectations, not considering organizational capacity when rolling out a new initiative, or setting policies and procedures that aren't useful?  Leaders clear the way, they don't stand in the way.

ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 5:20 PM

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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Don't Be Ruled by "Rules"

Don't Be Ruled by "Rules" | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
I have seen the future, and for better or worse, it seems to be made of thousands of "rules." For managing customer experiences, for driving how you engage with prospects, for nudging a customer
ozziegontang's insight:

A nice morning moment of reflection.


*Know the rules well, so that you can break them effectively. Dali Lama XIV My mentor,


Lee Thayer, reminded us many times that:

  • No tool/rule is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool/rule in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No too/rule or technique can be any better than its users.



----Being effective looks at doing what needs to be done to accomplish what needs to be accomplished. That starts with: Am I going to be better and more competent tomorrow than I was today at doing what needs to be done for the success of our organization in delivering what the customer/client/fellow employee/community needs.

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7 Reasons You Can't Learn Leadership on Your Own

7 Reasons You Can't Learn Leadership on Your Own | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Very few entrepreneurs, board members, or investors give much thought to leadership development. That's a huge mistake.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

Leadership begins at home with followership, decision making, choices and their consequences, knowing that: If you want to know the future, create it; and right thinking.  My thinking determines who I am. Who I am determines what I do.  What I do creates my habits. And my habits create me.  Mindfulness, like leadership is about practice. It takes a leader to destroy the adult daycare mentality that many people bring to work.


Am I awake, aware and living my life intentionally?


I am also reminded: Not everything new is good, nor everything old bad.


Evje sums it up well:


"A very hard element of personal growth is the awareness, discipline, and courage to set down the skills, activities, and identity of the past, in order to pick up new things for the future.  You can’t carry both.  You must listen for what the past is telling you to stop, and learn what the future requires you to start."



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Mark Taylor's curator insight, November 24, 2013 9:27 PM

Wow! Does this make sense? One survey of 17,000 global leaders found that the average age for their first leadership training was 42, “about 10 years after they began supervising people,” and almost 20 years after they started experiencing leadership in organizations.

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5 Words That Changed the U.S. Army and Leadership

5 Words That Changed the U.S. Army and Leadership | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
» 5 Words That Changed the U.S. Army and Leadership | "…on the shoulder of giants."
ozziegontang's insight:

All of this can be seen reflected in the almost 50 years of the work of Lee Thayer. 

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Finding My Greatness Zone | Leading Leaders to Greater Success

Finding My Greatness Zone | Leading Leaders to Greater Success | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

My Greatness Zone is a result of the passion when I find my unique contribution and live it. It is the place one can change the world for the better in some way. Cindy shares how she has found hers.

ozziegontang's insight:

We are interdependent.  We are herd/pack animals euphemistically calling ourselves social animals. It is with the help of others tht we reach our greatness.  That Greatness Zone lays in what Suzanne Livingston calls: My unique contribution. For me that is my passion around servant-leadership and building community.  Cindy shares well how the work as a fellow Vistage/TEC Chair has allowed me to fulfill my passion for the past 27 years.


Cindy talks about being good at what she did. She also mentions "I found I became bored easily"  When I can do something well and it becomes  habit, I can coast.  And you know what they say about coasting.  When you're coasting you're going downhill.


The challenge that Lee Thayer throws down is: How will I be better tomorrow that I was today in living my life and performing better than I was today personally and professionally?


Cindy has found her unique contribution that challenges her daily to be better than yesterday.


Remember, I cannot motivate another person. Motivation comes from within.


Motivation:  the state or condition of being motivated.

Motivate:     Providing motive.

Motive:        Goals or objectives of one's actions.Random House Dictionary


You may be able to inspire me, however it is up to me to achieve the "goals or objectives my one's actions."

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Dilbert Comic Strip 2013-06-30. Dilbert read Lee Thayer

Dilbert Comic Strip 2013-06-30. Dilbert read Lee Thayer | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

A tip of the hat to Scott Adams for the Dilbert Comic Strip 2013-06-13

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ozziegontang's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:34 AM

Lee has been adding the contact for over 40 years. Check out my Pinterest board on Lee Thayer On Leadership especially @BrianNarelle did a cartoon capture of Lee's Presentation here in San Diego a number of years ago. We forget that knowing and doing are worlds apart. You might want to start with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing and progress through his 9 or 10 other thought prodding and provoking  books by Lee. In the works: Mental Hygiene.


My thinking influences who I am and who I am impacts what I do and the habits I create. 


Check out this piece I wrote on the Kalama Sutra about who to believe.

ozziegontang's comment, July 8, 2013 3:12 AM
Lee has been adding the CONTEXT for over 40 years. The contact is with several thousand people who he has influenced helping them to think about what needs thinking.
Mark Taylor's curator insight, November 10, 3:39 PM

So true!

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Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness

Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

I am not saying that success is unimportant, that failure is okay, or that you should feel good about missing your goals. To live with excellence, you must use your resources fully, doing your best to accomplish the outcomes you seek. What I am asserting is that if you want to live a “good life” you must first learn to subordinate success to integrity.


Via Mark Taylor, ozziegontang
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Mark Taylor's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:58 AM

This is beautiful. Every leader should read it. Fred is talking about what we call in Tribal Leadership, core values. Most of us don't choose power, wealth, youth, beauty, pleasure, or fame, These are outcomes; qualities such as love, justice, discipline, vision, kindness, compassion, commitment, and courage are choices. The first ones depend on external circumstances; the second ones depend on you. We can design our lives to be the people we want  and to make the difference in the world.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, May 23, 2013 8:43 AM

Dave Logan, co-author of Tribal Leadership, speaks of crucible moments when very difficult circumstances call forth our greatness and, in many ways, our true selves.  Great leaders have these crucible moments (indeed we all do) and the author of this article identifies several of them while also presenting questions for you to answer as you seek out your special gifts, your greatness.  It is from this knowledge and utilization of our special gifts, when woven together with those of our colleagues, that great work cultures evolve.

ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:35 PM

The quote of John Wooden says it: 


“True success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming.”



Lee Thayer in his thought provoking and thought challenging book: Leadership: Thinking Being Doing shared:


"In all the world, there is no human e xperience that can compare to the exercise of the deeply-developed competencies required for the pursuit of a great and worthy achievement"


In the final paragraphs of the book he adds:


if you succeed, be humble. Others comspired with you to make it happen. You were blessed.


If you did not succeed, go backa nd fix the only things over which you have control: how you think, who you are, and how you do what you do. And make all of the tools required an integral part of who you are.

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3 Things That Make Mindfulness Extremely Difficult

3 Things That Make Mindfulness Extremely Difficult | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Instructing somebody to meditate -- to release or dis-identify with his or her thoughts -- is like trying to instruct somebody to instantly sneeze, or like telling someone just not to think, when the mind but built to do little else but that.

Via Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

What Ira shares is mirrored in understanding communication and communicating with understanding. It's not what we know that gets us in trouble. It's what we know that just ain't so that does.

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Empathy: What’s in it to Feel Others’ Pain? - The Dana Foundation

Empathy: What’s in it to Feel Others’ Pain? - The Dana Foundation | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

A Q & A with Abigail Marsh on Empathy.

ozziegontang's insight:

A short question and answer with Abigail Marsh by Robin Stevens Payes on some the research behind and an understanding of how much and how little we know about Empathy.


She shares: "Having compassion for other people goes away when you’re overly anxious. So learning to regulate your emotions is critical. We know that is particularly difficult during adolescence."


This is what the UCSD Center for Mindfulness Conference in February: Bridgin the Hearts & Minds of Youth: Mindfulness in Clinical Practice, Education and Research.


There was a wonderful session with Jon and Myla Kabat-Zinn on Mindful Parenting: Nurturing our Children, Growing Ourselves.

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Mindfulness & Monkey Mind: Thoughts are viruses

Mindfulness & Monkey Mind: Thoughts are viruses | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
  The ancestor of every action is thought. -- Emerson   Steve Robertson reminds us in this Huffington Report article Mindfulness and Monkey Mind: Our ...
ozziegontang's insight:

Some of my thoughts after reading Steve Robertson's Mindfulness & Monkey Mind and how Lee's thoughts reflect that same Mindfulness when it comes to who is responsible in communication.


My message in any medium is not a message if it is not accessed and interpreted by some person.


My message is not a message if the receiver doesn't take my message into account.


My message is not the message I intended if the other person interprets it other than the way I intended.


So the learning lesson for me, if I am able to hear is:

The one who interprets my message

is always the one who is in control.


So it is my responsibility as the receiver of the communication for getting the message the person speaking to me intended.


My communication and all communication have consequences. Those consequences involve me and the other(s) who hear my communication.Those consequences  are independent of intentions (mine or theirs, communication skills (mind or theirs) or whatever is going on in life (mine or theirs).


This brings us back to my blog and the quotes from Lee on the metaphor of communication being like a virus.  The Kalama Sutra said the same thing over 2500 years ago.

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