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Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations
Lee Thayer has been one of the seminal thinkers in the area of communication.
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Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy?

Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy? | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Many leaders inadvertently stand in the way of superior performance. Here’s how to avoid the hindrance trap.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, February 8, 9:10 PM

As Pogo said, we have met the enemy and the enemy is us.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, February 10, 9:53 AM

Leadership is largely about developing your people, setting a vision, and supporting them in making it happen.  But are you hindering that success by not setting clear expectations, not considering organizational capacity when rolling out a new initiative, or setting policies and procedures that aren't useful?  Leaders clear the way, they don't stand in the way.

ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 5:20 PM

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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7 Ways Transformational Leaders Are Different | workplace MOJO

7 Ways Transformational Leaders Are Different | workplace MOJO | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
ozziegontang's insight:

Thanks to fellow Mark Taylor for sharing this Scoop.


You will find Lee's book: Leadership Virtuosity a great read as he shares the
"building blocks for becoming a virtuoso leader." 


The "Lucky Leader

The "Good" Leader

The Real-World Leader

The Imaginative Leader

The Trustworthy Leader

The Triangulating Leader

The Articulate Leader

The Responsible Leader

The Defining Leader

The Caring Leader

The Accomplishment-Minded Leader

The Learning Leader

The Seductive Leader

The Intolerant Leader

The Potent Leader

The Omnpresent Leader

The Frugal Leader

The Strategic Leader

The Passionate Leader

The Performing Leader




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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture - McKinsey Quarterly - Organization - Talent

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture - McKinsey Quarterly - Organization - Talent | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. .

ozziegontang's insight:

Thanks to John Page, fellow Vistage Chair, for sharing this article. Goes along with the old adage: The more one gives, the more one receives.


Back to Simon Sinek's Oxytocin.  It feels good to give, it feels good to receive, and the one's observing also get a feel good by what they observe.. 


Some of the statements that reflect this are:


He climbs highest who lifts as he goes.


If you want to travel fast, go alone

If you want to travel far, go together,


We call ourselves social animals or  human beings.

We are herd/pack animals.  We need each other.


We are all interdependent.  Everything is related to everything else. We forget that everything is connected, I can only create what I can imagine.


John Lennon reminds us: Imagine.


Yet, Game Theory and the DSM-soon to be V, removed the context. John Nash in his genius that created game theory was in a state of paranoid schizophrenia. Remove the confounding variable of feelings and emotions. When he tested his theory out on the secretary pool, they helped each other.  When the hundreds of thousands of questionaires that were sent out to establish the symptoms that could be used to diagnosis various psychiatric or psychological pathology - Diagnostic Statistic Manual (DSM) - what was left out was the human element of context. If you have 7 of the 9 symptoms, there is a X percent liklihood that you are suffering from:: fill in the blank.


I am grateful for Alfred Adler who said that when you are certain that you have analyzed the person's situation and are sure of your decision, he added:  It could be different.


If there was the death of a loved one. If one had been divorced, or experienced a reduction-in-force, a family disagreement turned nasty, a false accusation, a vindictive co-worker, there are emotional states that are human when going through such stresses, losses or traumas. Our defense mechanisms, our reactions are all part of being human.


As Lee Thayer reminds us:  If you want to see the culture/company/family you deserve; look at the one you have. 


The way I think influences my habits and my habits influence who I am. And who I am can be seen in what I do, and how I behave. Do I create a safe space. Does my company, my community, my family create a safe space where I am respected, appreciated, and cared for. it's the proverbial: wingman; the someone who wants me to succeed, the one who sees the potential and challenges it out of me.


Being competent and doing excellent work is its own reward and gives one a life worth living.  . 

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