Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations
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Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations
Lee Thayer has been one of the seminal thinkers in the area of communication.
Curated by ozziegontang
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Great Leadership Requires Asking Questions

Great Leadership Requires Asking Questions | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

Great leaders are those who instead ask the right questions and engage others to arrive at the best answers together.


Via donhornsby, Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

Lee would simply share: The role of the leader is to be a virtuoso question-asker.  Questions open. Answers close. 


Thanks to Annette Schmeling for sharing from Serving and Leadership.

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 20, 2014 10:10 AM

(From the article) “When a leader asks the questions,” says Wiseman, “they channel the energy and intelligence of their team on the challenge at hand, and they shift the burden of thinking onto others.”

 

Instead of looking to answer the big and important questions on his or her own, the multiplier asks provocative questions of the group and encourages them to work on it together. This engages employees like nothing else and no longer has them sitting on the sidelines awaiting the answer from their leader.

 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:59 PM

A key is when asking questions is to listen deeply. I read Parker Palmer and use his work in my writing. The key person to question and listen to is one's self. This requires quietness that we do not find in the hectic pace of daily life. It is a meditative space when we listen to our self and to others.

Annette Schmeling's curator insight, March 20, 2014 3:46 PM

Effective questions are those that accomplish their purpose as well as build a positive relationships. Questions that work should build a deeper and better understanding of the problem and possible solutions, but should also construct better working relations among the problem solvers.  Edgar Schein in his book Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling promotes the kind of inquiry that comes from an attitude of interest and curiosity. Inviting others to tell their story in their own words helps to establish rapport, gather information and increase understanding.

 

Humble Inquiry changes the quality of listening from confirming habitual judgments and the focus on the factual/objective data to more empathic and generative listening (Otto Scharmer) and greater humility. My whole being is able to slow down and to be present when I can suspend my judgment and enter into the question at a deeper level. 

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Mark Nepo: How to Stay Present in a World of Distractions - Super Soul Sunday - OWN

Subscribe to OWN: http://bit.ly/18Lz0rV Poet and best-selling Mark Nepo says to listen to someone is to be truly present—but it's not always easy to do in a ...

Via Annette Schmeling
ozziegontang's insight:

As dear friend Annette Schmeling shares:


"Mindless habits sap our energy, steal our time and clutter our life at home & work. It is the never-ending obsession with doing or being good enough. Mark Nepo and Oprah highlight, in the video clip, the limitations of the listening to the constant chatter of the inner critic, our distractions and busyness. Nepo stresses the need to develop the discipline and personal practice of presence."

 

"Being fully present in the here and now creates greater peace, power and harmony. Presence and making genuine, loving contact is not always safe or easy. There is always a risk involved in trying to make a real connection. Being aware of our presence and making small adjustments in our mindless habits will help our lives flow more harmoniously according to our own nature and natural rhythms."


So I remind myself: Am I awake, aware, fully present and living my life intentionally?

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Annette Schmeling's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:46 PM

Mindless habits sap our energy, steal our time and clutter our life at home & work. It is the never-ending obsession with doing or being good enough. Mark Nepo and Oprah highlight, in the video clip, the limitations of the listening to the constant chatter of the inner critic, our distractions and busyness. Nepo stresses the need to develop the discipline and personal practice of presence.

 

Being fully present in the here and now creates greater peace, power and harmony. Presence and making genuine, loving contact is not always safe or easy. There is always a risk involved in trying to make a real connection. Being aware of our presence and making small adjustments in our mindless habits will help our lives flow more harmoniously according to our own nature and natural rhythms.