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Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations
Lee Thayer has been one of the seminal thinkers in the area of communication.
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Learning to Read Their Minds - Chief Learning Officer, Solutions for Enterprise Productivity

Learning to Read Their Minds - Chief Learning Officer, Solutions for Enterprise Productivity | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

New insights into how the brain works are changing how learning leaders structure programs and how the corporate learning industry thinks about knowledge retention and study habits.

ozziegontang's insight:

While scientists now know more about the brain, it's validating scientifically what our earliest philosophers understood intuitively. They lived and practiced: repeated retrieval, the spacing effect, and deep encoding, Think: knowing my times tables. Or the Roman who held up two fingers and said: Five beers please.


Science is a metaphor for understanding reality.  The truth is that I do not learn from my experiences. I learn from my interpretation of my experiences. Remember that reality is my reality because it is filtered through my mental model. My mental model  is based upon  my interpretation of my unique experiences (that have a great deal in common with many others in the species genus homo.  So we are back to Lee Thayer's: Get my thinking right.


For how I think creates and reflects who I am. Who I am and how i think create what I do.  What I do creates my habits and then in the end my habits create me.  So it is in the doing the right thinking about doing the right actions that creates me. (The Latin verb for the word "do" is: ago/agere, agi, actus.


Think with the end in mind. Or another way of saying it is: Act from the future.


So in one way we live reality while understanding reality by explaining it metaphorically through science. I continually have to be reminded not to mistake the finger pointing at the moon for the moon.


ozzie Mindfulness.com

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The Role of Leaders in Helping Others Find Meaning at Work

The Role of Leaders in Helping Others Find Meaning at Work | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

"Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for." - Viktor E. Frankl
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99"Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for." - Viktor E. Frankl
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99

"Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for." - Viktor E. Frankl


Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

Very little to add beyond Mark's insight.


Lee would simply say:  Leaders don't have a vision. They are had by their vision.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, January 22, 2014 8:34 AM

Kim Cameron, in his book Positive Leadership, observes that work is associated with meaningfulness when it has one or more of the following key attributes:

The work has an important impact on the well-being of human beingsThe work is associated with an important virtue or personal valueThe work has an impact that extends beyond the immediate time frame or creates a ripple effectThe work builds supportive relationships or a sense of community in people
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99

Kim Cameron, in his book Positive Leadership, observes that work is associated with meaningfulness when it has one or more of the following key attributes:

The work has an important impact on the well-being of human beingsThe work is associated with an important virtue or personal valueThe work has an impact that extends beyond the immediate time frame or creates a ripple effectThe work builds supportive relationships or a sense of community in people
Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-role-of-leaders-in-helping-others-find-meaning-at-work-3055?nopaging=1#lgyouIddyxyyoBcP.99

As leaders, our employees will follow when we have a noble cause--something beyond just making money. This article differentiates a few ways you can do that:

 

1. The work has an important impact on the well-being of human beings

2. The work is associated with an important virtue or personal value

3. The work has an impact that extends beyond the immediate time frame or creates a ripple effect

4. The work builds supportive relationships or a sense of community in people

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5 Words That Changed the U.S. Army and Leadership

5 Words That Changed the U.S. Army and Leadership | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
» 5 Words That Changed the U.S. Army and Leadership | "…on the shoulder of giants."
ozziegontang's insight:

All of this can be seen reflected in the almost 50 years of the work of Lee Thayer. 

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Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness

Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

I am not saying that success is unimportant, that failure is okay, or that you should feel good about missing your goals. To live with excellence, you must use your resources fully, doing your best to accomplish the outcomes you seek. What I am asserting is that if you want to live a “good life” you must first learn to subordinate success to integrity.


Via Mark Taylor, ozziegontang
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Mark Taylor's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:58 AM

This is beautiful. Every leader should read it. Fred is talking about what we call in Tribal Leadership, core values. Most of us don't choose power, wealth, youth, beauty, pleasure, or fame, These are outcomes; qualities such as love, justice, discipline, vision, kindness, compassion, commitment, and courage are choices. The first ones depend on external circumstances; the second ones depend on you. We can design our lives to be the people we want  and to make the difference in the world.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, May 23, 2013 8:43 AM

Dave Logan, co-author of Tribal Leadership, speaks of crucible moments when very difficult circumstances call forth our greatness and, in many ways, our true selves.  Great leaders have these crucible moments (indeed we all do) and the author of this article identifies several of them while also presenting questions for you to answer as you seek out your special gifts, your greatness.  It is from this knowledge and utilization of our special gifts, when woven together with those of our colleagues, that great work cultures evolve.

ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:35 PM

The quote of John Wooden says it: 


“True success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming.”



Lee Thayer in his thought provoking and thought challenging book: Leadership: Thinking Being Doing shared:


"In all the world, there is no human e xperience that can compare to the exercise of the deeply-developed competencies required for the pursuit of a great and worthy achievement"


In the final paragraphs of the book he adds:


if you succeed, be humble. Others comspired with you to make it happen. You were blessed.


If you did not succeed, go backa nd fix the only things over which you have control: how you think, who you are, and how you do what you do. And make all of the tools required an integral part of who you are.

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Innovative Leadership: It Starts With Words [& Stories]

Innovative Leadership:  It Starts With Words [& Stories] | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Innovation leadership needs to start early. Freshman writing may be as good a place as any.

Via Karen Dietz, ozziegontang
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Sue Peterson's curator insight, May 10, 2013 11:05 AM

It seems to me that good, quality classes should always include at least a bit of the skills discussed in this article - reflection, the ability to find different perspectives, the ability to converse about those differences...but, I guess it is good to have some affirmation from Forbes.  

 

Also an interesting read as I have applied for our University's leadership program for students that provides them with mentors as well as specific opportunities for developing leadership skills.  

ozziegontang's curator insight, May 11, 2013 6:17 PM

Actually it starts with the way that I think. My thinkiandrogen influences who I am. Who I am influences what I do. The writing part comes from my thinking and my being. Reading Lee Thayer's book Leadership Virtuosity would be very helpful in seeing leadership from this aspect and all its many other perspectives.

Linda Allen's curator insight, May 13, 2013 8:51 PM

Excellent!

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7 Ways Transformational Leaders Are Different | workplace MOJO

7 Ways Transformational Leaders Are Different | workplace MOJO | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
ozziegontang's insight:

Thanks to fellow Mark Taylor for sharing this Scoop.


You will find Lee's book: Leadership Virtuosity a great read as he shares the
"building blocks for becoming a virtuoso leader." 


The "Lucky Leader

The "Good" Leader

The Real-World Leader

The Imaginative Leader

The Trustworthy Leader

The Triangulating Leader

The Articulate Leader

The Responsible Leader

The Defining Leader

The Caring Leader

The Accomplishment-Minded Leader

The Learning Leader

The Seductive Leader

The Intolerant Leader

The Potent Leader

The Omnpresent Leader

The Frugal Leader

The Strategic Leader

The Passionate Leader

The Performing Leader




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Phil Hauck's TEC Blog: Lee Thayer on High Performance Leadership

Phil Hauck's TEC Blog: Lee Thayer on High Performance Leadership | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
ozziegontang's insight:

Excellent summary by TEC Chair Phil Hauck

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Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy?

Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy? | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Many leaders inadvertently stand in the way of superior performance. Here’s how to avoid the hindrance trap.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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Mark Taylor's curator insight, February 8, 2014 9:10 PM

As Pogo said, we have met the enemy and the enemy is us.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:53 AM

Leadership is largely about developing your people, setting a vision, and supporting them in making it happen.  But are you hindering that success by not setting clear expectations, not considering organizational capacity when rolling out a new initiative, or setting policies and procedures that aren't useful?  Leaders clear the way, they don't stand in the way.

ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 2014 5:20 PM

The story of Ralph Stayer is interesting in getting out of one's own way.  What is more interesting is that his mentor early on was Lee Thayer who asked the questions that needed to be asked.


Lee Thayer reminded me numerous times:

  • No tool is any better than the understanding of the person using it.
  • The best tool in the wrong hands will not accomplish what was intended.
  • No tool or technique can be any better than its users

 

And BOLDED as a reminder:

 

The Mother of all tools is how I think about what needs thinking about.


It would serve one well to get to right thinking by reading any of Lee's books starting with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing or an easier start would be: A Pocket Oracle for Leaders.

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7 Reasons You Can't Learn Leadership on Your Own

7 Reasons You Can't Learn Leadership on Your Own | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Very few entrepreneurs, board members, or investors give much thought to leadership development. That's a huge mistake.

Via Mark Taylor
ozziegontang's insight:

Leadership begins at home with followership, decision making, choices and their consequences, knowing that: If you want to know the future, create it; and right thinking.  My thinking determines who I am. Who I am determines what I do.  What I do creates my habits. And my habits create me.  Mindfulness, like leadership is about practice. It takes a leader to destroy the adult daycare mentality that many people bring to work.


Am I awake, aware and living my life intentionally?


I am also reminded: Not everything new is good, nor everything old bad.


Evje sums it up well:


"A very hard element of personal growth is the awareness, discipline, and courage to set down the skills, activities, and identity of the past, in order to pick up new things for the future.  You can’t carry both.  You must listen for what the past is telling you to stop, and learn what the future requires you to start."



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Mark Taylor's curator insight, November 24, 2013 9:27 PM

Wow! Does this make sense? One survey of 17,000 global leaders found that the average age for their first leadership training was 42, “about 10 years after they began supervising people,” and almost 20 years after they started experiencing leadership in organizations.

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Finding My Greatness Zone | Leading Leaders to Greater Success

Finding My Greatness Zone | Leading Leaders to Greater Success | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

My Greatness Zone is a result of the passion when I find my unique contribution and live it. It is the place one can change the world for the better in some way. Cindy shares how she has found hers.

ozziegontang's insight:

We are interdependent.  We are herd/pack animals euphemistically calling ourselves social animals. It is with the help of others tht we reach our greatness.  That Greatness Zone lays in what Suzanne Livingston calls: My unique contribution. For me that is my passion around servant-leadership and building community.  Cindy shares well how the work as a fellow Vistage/TEC Chair has allowed me to fulfill my passion for the past 27 years.


Cindy talks about being good at what she did. She also mentions "I found I became bored easily"  When I can do something well and it becomes  habit, I can coast.  And you know what they say about coasting.  When you're coasting you're going downhill.


The challenge that Lee Thayer throws down is: How will I be better tomorrow that I was today in living my life and performing better than I was today personally and professionally?


Cindy has found her unique contribution that challenges her daily to be better than yesterday.


Remember, I cannot motivate another person. Motivation comes from within.


Motivation:  the state or condition of being motivated.

Motivate:     Providing motive.

Motive:        Goals or objectives of one's actions.Random House Dictionary


You may be able to inspire me, however it is up to me to achieve the "goals or objectives my one's actions."

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'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO

'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Lieutent General William F. Talley, Chief of the U.S. Army Reserve For 30 years, Lieutenant General Jeffrey W.
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ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:12 PM

It is about service to others. Some wonderful insights that General Talley shares to the questions asked.


"I have to get people to think I’m a careful, compassionate, caring leader, and then people will help me do things."


The General's words echo what Lee Thayer has been teaching for over 4 decades to leaders: "The most fundamental lessons is that leadership is about commitment, competence and character."

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What great coaches do -- and leaders should, too

What great coaches do -- and leaders should, too | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Doing some post-game analysis of everything that goes right -- and wrong -- can help your team win
ozziegontang's insight:

Becoming more competent is making sure that no matter the situation one is always prepared because nothing is left to chance or luck.  Competition and competent come from the Latin derivation "cum peto" that is "to seek with." When I am competing with you I like you want to know who is the best.  In a sporting event is is who is best today at this moment in this event we have just competed in.  I help you by doing my best. And my best may be what inspires you and drives you to better me that day.


When I coast on my past laurels know I can only coast when I am going downhill.


Accountability means if we accomplish what we have set out to do we will celebrate.  If we have failed, it is making sure that it will not happen again.

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The New Rules of Leadership - Forbes

The New Rules of Leadership - Forbes | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Spring is in the air, the days are getting longer and the crocuses are poking up their hopeful heads. Yet, these remain bleak times for too many job seekers, even leaders and managers with impressive resumes.
ozziegontang's insight:

I can start with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing to hone my right thinking by asking the questions on the road to becoming a virtuoso Question-Asker.  From there I will find myself reading anyone of his other 10 books numerous times to keep myself in the Learning Mode.  This lifelong work will enhance my life and my work every day of my life.

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The Leader's Journey with Lee Thayer

The Leader's Journey with Lee Thayer | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Now you can let Lee Thayer rattle your cage about your leadership skills, business performance, management ideas, and more, whenever you choose.
ozziegontang's insight:

This is the Blog that started as the leader's Journey.  As always, some thought provoking dialogue and questions.

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