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Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations
Lee Thayer has been one of the seminal thinkers in the area of communication.
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Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness

Class of 2013: Find Your Spiritual Harness | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

I am not saying that success is unimportant, that failure is okay, or that you should feel good about missing your goals. To live with excellence, you must use your resources fully, doing your best to accomplish the outcomes you seek. What I am asserting is that if you want to live a “good life” you must first learn to subordinate success to integrity.


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Mark Taylor's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:58 AM

This is beautiful. Every leader should read it. Fred is talking about what we call in Tribal Leadership, core values. Most of us don't choose power, wealth, youth, beauty, pleasure, or fame, These are outcomes; qualities such as love, justice, discipline, vision, kindness, compassion, commitment, and courage are choices. The first ones depend on external circumstances; the second ones depend on you. We can design our lives to be the people we want  and to make the difference in the world.

Rich Maxwell's curator insight, May 23, 2013 8:43 AM

Dave Logan, co-author of Tribal Leadership, speaks of crucible moments when very difficult circumstances call forth our greatness and, in many ways, our true selves.  Great leaders have these crucible moments (indeed we all do) and the author of this article identifies several of them while also presenting questions for you to answer as you seek out your special gifts, your greatness.  It is from this knowledge and utilization of our special gifts, when woven together with those of our colleagues, that great work cultures evolve.

ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:35 PM

The quote of John Wooden says it: 


“True success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming.”



Lee Thayer in his thought provoking and thought challenging book: Leadership: Thinking Being Doing shared:


"In all the world, there is no human e xperience that can compare to the exercise of the deeply-developed competencies required for the pursuit of a great and worthy achievement"


In the final paragraphs of the book he adds:


if you succeed, be humble. Others comspired with you to make it happen. You were blessed.


If you did not succeed, go backa nd fix the only things over which you have control: how you think, who you are, and how you do what you do. And make all of the tools required an integral part of who you are.

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture - McKinsey Quarterly - Organization - Talent

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture - McKinsey Quarterly - Organization - Talent | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it

By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. .

ozziegontang's insight:

Thanks to John Page, fellow Vistage Chair, for sharing this article. Goes along with the old adage: The more one gives, the more one receives.


Back to Simon Sinek's Oxytocin.  It feels good to give, it feels good to receive, and the one's observing also get a feel good by what they observe.. 


Some of the statements that reflect this are:


He climbs highest who lifts as he goes.


If you want to travel fast, go alone

If you want to travel far, go together,


We call ourselves social animals or  human beings.

We are herd/pack animals.  We need each other.


We are all interdependent.  Everything is related to everything else. We forget that everything is connected, I can only create what I can imagine.


John Lennon reminds us: Imagine.


Yet, Game Theory and the DSM-soon to be V, removed the context. John Nash in his genius that created game theory was in a state of paranoid schizophrenia. Remove the confounding variable of feelings and emotions. When he tested his theory out on the secretary pool, they helped each other.  When the hundreds of thousands of questionaires that were sent out to establish the symptoms that could be used to diagnosis various psychiatric or psychological pathology - Diagnostic Statistic Manual (DSM) - what was left out was the human element of context. If you have 7 of the 9 symptoms, there is a X percent liklihood that you are suffering from:: fill in the blank.


I am grateful for Alfred Adler who said that when you are certain that you have analyzed the person's situation and are sure of your decision, he added:  It could be different.


If there was the death of a loved one. If one had been divorced, or experienced a reduction-in-force, a family disagreement turned nasty, a false accusation, a vindictive co-worker, there are emotional states that are human when going through such stresses, losses or traumas. Our defense mechanisms, our reactions are all part of being human.


As Lee Thayer reminds us:  If you want to see the culture/company/family you deserve; look at the one you have. 


The way I think influences my habits and my habits influence who I am. And who I am can be seen in what I do, and how I behave. Do I create a safe space. Does my company, my community, my family create a safe space where I am respected, appreciated, and cared for. it's the proverbial: wingman; the someone who wants me to succeed, the one who sees the potential and challenges it out of me.


Being competent and doing excellent work is its own reward and gives one a life worth living.  . 

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Phil Hauck's TEC Blog: Lee Thayer on High Performance Leadership

Phil Hauck's TEC Blog: Lee Thayer on High Performance Leadership | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
ozziegontang's insight:

Excellent summary by TEC Chair Phil Hauck

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'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO

'It's Always About Service To Others': Leadership Lessons From A Soldier CEO | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Lieutent General William F. Talley, Chief of the U.S. Army Reserve For 30 years, Lieutenant General Jeffrey W.
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ozziegontang's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:12 PM

It is about service to others. Some wonderful insights that General Talley shares to the questions asked.


"I have to get people to think I’m a careful, compassionate, caring leader, and then people will help me do things."


The General's words echo what Lee Thayer has been teaching for over 4 decades to leaders: "The most fundamental lessons is that leadership is about commitment, competence and character."

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The New Rules of Leadership - Forbes

The New Rules of Leadership - Forbes | Lee Thayer: His Thinking Regarding Leadership & High Performance Organizations | Scoop.it
Spring is in the air, the days are getting longer and the crocuses are poking up their hopeful heads. Yet, these remain bleak times for too many job seekers, even leaders and managers with impressive resumes.
ozziegontang's insight:

I can start with: Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing to hone my right thinking by asking the questions on the road to becoming a virtuoso Question-Asker.  From there I will find myself reading anyone of his other 10 books numerous times to keep myself in the Learning Mode.  This lifelong work will enhance my life and my work every day of my life.

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