What Young Children Really Need
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Do Parents Nurture Narcissists By Pouring On The Praise?

Do Parents Nurture Narcissists By Pouring On The Praise? | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Telling your kids that they're superfabulous encourages narcissistic thinking, researchers say. And that doesn't bode well for their future happiness. Better to recognize effort and say, "I love you."
Sandra Loughlin, Ph.D.'s insight:

"When a kid does something amazing, you want to tell her so. You might tell her that she's very smart. You might tell her that she's a very special kid. Or you might say that she must have worked really hard.

 

On the surface, they all sound like the same compliments. But according to Brad Bushman, a communications and psychology professor at Ohio State University, the first two increase the child's chances of becoming a narcissist. Only the last one raises the child's self-esteem and keeps her ego in check.

 

Bushman and a group of collaborators surveyed parents to see how they show warmth and value their child's accomplishments. They then compared those findings to the children's levels of self-esteem and narcissism. The results were published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

Of course, self-esteem and narcissism are two very different things. The difference has to do with how you value yourself compared to other people. "Self-esteem basically means you're a person of worth equal with other people," Bushman tells Shots. "Narcissism means you think you're better than other people."

 

And not in a good way."

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Q&A: Blocks, Play, Screen Time And The Infant Mind

Q&A: Blocks, Play, Screen Time And The Infant Mind | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Studies with wooden blocks show "that children who play with blocks learn language better and have better cognition."
Sandra Loughlin, Ph.D.'s insight:

"The interesting thing about blocks is that, in one way, shape or form, they've probably existed for millennia. Long before anyone marketed such things, children probably built things with sticks and stones, and some children do that now anyways.

 

Blocks have never, ever, marketed themselves as an educational toy. For most parents, they've simply been something that was fun to do. And it's interesting because in today's climate there are literally hundreds, if not thousands, of toys that make explicit claims that they are educational, that they will make your child smarter, or a young engineer or a poet. And the overwhelming majority of those products have no evidence whatsoever to make those assertions."

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Expert panel recommends new sleep durations

Expert panel recommends new sleep durations | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
The National Sleep Foundation, along with a multi-disciplinary expert panel, issued its new recommendations for appropriate sleep durations. The NSF convened experts from sleep, anatomy and physiology, as well as pediatrics, neurology, gerontology and gynecology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines. The report recommends wider appropriate sleep ranges for most age groups.
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Fast food may lead to lower school results for U.S. kids: study

Fast food may lead to lower school results for U.S. kids: study | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Eating fast food may lead to lower student test scores in math, science and reading, a recent study of U.S. school children said.A survey showed that fast-food consumption by 8,544
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Children learn much from field trips that they can’t get from lectures or textbooks

Children learn much from field trips that they can’t get from lectures or textbooks | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
The number of field trips students go on these days is declining. This is a detriment for kids everywhere.
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Linking Students’ Emotions and Academic Achievement: When and Why Emotions Matter

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Learning Empathy by Design

Learning Empathy by Design | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
How Peace Tables Can Save Classroom Time, Build Problem-Solving Skills, and Increase Confidence
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Re-Designing Play, Re-Imagining Learning: 3 Players To Watch

Re-Designing Play, Re-Imagining Learning: 3 Players To Watch | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
If we were honest with ourselves, we'd admit that many of our education systems prioritize things other than whole-child development. “We’ve got an obsession in believing that literacy and numeracy and content acquisition are the principal objectives of school systems,” said Andrew Bollington, Global Head of Research and Learning at the [...]
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Does Play Matter?

Does Play Matter? | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
What if we told you that the answer to helping your kids thrive was to play with them? What if we told you that if you just played with them and talked to them about everyday household objects -- nothing fancy, no spinning and blinking electronic toy...
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Health Officials Call for More Fish in Diets of Children and Pregnant Women

Health Officials Call for More Fish in Diets of Children and Pregnant Women | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Federal officials on Tuesday announced that women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should eat at least eight ounces of fish per week, but still no more than 12.
Sandra Loughlin, Ph.D.'s insight:

Brain food!

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A Game-Changing Treatment for ADHD

A Game-Changing Treatment for ADHD | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Evidence suggests that old-fashioned childhood games — simple family play — can improve executive function, working memory, and self-control in kids with attention deficit.
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Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes

Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Swedish kids growing up in families that wash their dishes by hand are less likely to develop certain allergies than those in families with dishwashers, a study suggests. But there may be more to it.
Sandra Loughlin, Ph.D.'s insight:

"The findings are the latest to support the "hygiene hypothesis," a still-evolving proposition that's been gaining momentum in recent years. The hypothesis basically suggests that people in developed countries are growing up way too clean because of a variety of trends, including the use of hand sanitizers and detergents, and spending too little time around animals.


As a result, children don't tend to be exposed to as many bacteria and other microorganisms, and maybe that deprives their immune system of the chance to be trained to recognize microbial friend from foe.

That may make the immune system more likely to misfire and overreact in a way that leads to allergies, eczema and asthma, Hesselmar says."

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The Myth of the Minecraft Curriculum

The Myth of the Minecraft Curriculum | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
From the moment parents bring their babies home, they are bombarded with messages from marketers, family members, and pediatricians that toys must be educational, thanks in part to a series of studies beginning in the 1960s. In 1962, a group of scientists discovered that rats raised as pets were better at problem solving than those raised in cages. Building on this study, a psychologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign showed that rats raised with other rats in large cages filled with lots of fun rat toys were significantly smarter than those raised in barren, isolated cages. Researchers concluded that children raised in “enriched” environments—which for the rats meant having lots of toys—would be smarter than those raised in “impoverished” ones.

So, extending rat behavior to that among humans, it stands to reason that the more “enriched” parents make their child’s environment, the greater an intellect that kid will develop. And now that children as young as 6 are prepping for college, who wouldn’t want to boost their youngster’s intellectuality early on? The result is that the idea of an “enriched environment” has been translated by many parents to mean an environment in which a child is always learning something concrete, be it an appreciation of classical music or the alphabet.

Unfortunately, the analogy doesn’t really hold up. In their book, Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn—And Why, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff write that there is no childhood equivalent to a rat raised in an isolated cage. And furthermore, children might actually learn more from experiencing nature rather than artificially enriched environments. In other words: Parents who really want their child to learn something should just send the kid outside.
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Pre-K teachers lurch between feeling like heroes and feeling like the enemy

Pre-K teachers lurch between feeling like heroes and feeling like the enemy | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
I wish they could have been playing.
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Yes, Your Toddler Really Is Smarter Than A 5-Year-Old

Yes, Your Toddler Really Is Smarter Than A 5-Year-Old | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Developmental psychologists are trying to figure out what very small children know and when they know it. The answer: a lot, and a lot earlier than you think. One experiment finds that 18-month-olds can reason abstractly when sorting blocks, well before they are able to explain it.
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Employers receptive to hiring IT job candidates with MOOC educations

Employers receptive to hiring IT job candidates with MOOC educations | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Education alone won't result in a job offer. Employers want candidates who have used their tech skills
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More Active Play Equals Better Thinking Skills For Kids

More Active Play Equals Better Thinking Skills For Kids | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
How long can you sit still in a desk? How about your 7-year-old? Maybe you could both use a break. A study shows that kids who get to run around and play after school are better at paying attention.
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Can Mindfulness Help Kids Learn Self-Control?

Can Mindfulness Help Kids Learn Self-Control? | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
A new study explores how cultivating moment-to-moment awareness can help children defer gratification.
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Want Your Kids To Ace School? Good Motor Skills May Help

Want Your Kids To Ace School? Good Motor Skills May Help | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
Children and teenagers who are aerobically fit and and have good motor skills do better academically, researchers say. But muscle strength doesn't help. And those motor skills may matter most.
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The mathematical preschool board game

The mathematical preschool board game | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
The smart preschool board game: What studies reveal about the link between games and math skills.
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Rethinking the Colorful Kindergarten Classroom

Rethinking the Colorful Kindergarten Classroom | What Young Children Really Need | Scoop.it
When kindergarteners were taught in a highly decorated classroom, they were more distracted, and their test scores lower, than when they were taught in a room that was comparatively spartan, a new study found.
Sandra Loughlin, Ph.D.'s insight:

I considered doing my dissertation on this topic. I'm glad someone else did it!

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