learning design
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learning design
The design of learning environments; institutional, public and private
Curated by Peter Sampson
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Rescooped by Peter Sampson from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Research: How Video Production Affects Student Engagement

edX recently commissioned a study of nearly 1,000 videos, segmenting them out by by video type and production style, and discovered this among their other findings:

Shorter videos are more engaging. Engagement drops after 6 minutes.Videos with a more personal feeling are more effective than high-fidelity studio recordings.
Videos in which the instructor speaks quickly and with high enthusiasm are more engaging.Khan-style tablet drawings are more engaging than power point slides.
Via Dennis T OConnor
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 3, 2014 2:30 AM

Research: How Video Production Affects Student Engagement

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, September 4, 2014 4:23 PM

An interesting study from the EdX people on using videos in an online course. 

KB...Konnected's curator insight, September 6, 2014 12:49 AM

Good to know.

Rescooped by Peter Sampson from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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MOOC: Every letter is negotiable | Mathieu Plourde - blog

MOOC: Every letter is negotiable | Mathieu Plourde - blog | learning design | Scoop.it
Just a visual representation of intepretations of what MOOCs are.

Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, April 9, 2013 7:16 AM

Exactly what it says it is, but it nicely highlights the variety that underlies MOOCs and our talk about them (@pbsloep)

Ada Torres's curator insight, May 30, 2015 7:14 AM

un concepto dudoso y intrigante.

Rescooped by Peter Sampson from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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MOOCs and Distance Education Institutions | Terry Anderson - Virtual Canuck, Teaching and Learning in a Net-Centric world, blog

MOOCs and Distance Education Institutions | Terry Anderson - Virtual Canuck, Teaching and Learning in a Net-Centric world, blog | learning design | Scoop.it

Much has been written and much more will by the time you are reading this article, from when I write it in March 2013 – the MOOC terrain is under very rapid development. John Daniel (2012) article, does a good job of defining and describing MOOCs and clearly notes the different models and pedagogy (xMOOCs, cMOOCs) that differentiate pedagogies, practices and profits involved in today’s MOOC offerings. In this article, I attempt to update our map of the terrain and provide a lens through my 2003 Interaction Equivalency Theorem (Anderson, 2003) to help us understand and explain this latest development and/or fad in higher education.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, June 25, 2013 5:52 AM

After unpacking the acronym (and saying some very useful things about the O of openness), Terry Anderson discusses MOOCs under the headings of:

- pedagogy: "I am not so quick to denigrate this [cognitivist-behaviourist] pedagogy …"

- loss of academic jobs: "… technophiles have been making predictions and teachers dreading the possibility of their replacement by advanced communications technologies. Prior to MOOCs these promises have not materialized …]

- participation: "… there many different types of students attracted and they have wide variety of expectations and commitments …"

- credentialing: "Perhaps between these two competing systems [degree credits versus certificates of completion] lies an opportunity for nimble open education institutions."

- business models: "Two features of MOOCs have most concerned politicians, press and academia. These are the lack of a clear revenue model to justify institutional expenses and entry of ‘silicon valley’ mindset…."

- implications for open and distance education: "MOOCs and especially those developed by for-profit companies can be perceived as yet more unwelcomed competition to distance education institutions. But …"

 

The article is written from the perspective of how MOOCs affect open universities, but has a lot of sensible thinking to offer to anybody with an interest in MOOCs. Terry's willingness to make unpopular claims, adds to this: "It is quite surprising to me how many of my educational colleagues seem so skeptical of any potential improvement in education effectiveness, as if our profession is incapable of exploiting technological and pedagogical innovations that are available to us." Highly recommended reading! (@pbsloep)