Learning To Bow: Japanese Education
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how to use chopsticks

how to use chopsticks | Learning To Bow: Japanese Education | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The article is about the proper use of chopsticks. It relates to the book because the book explains how Japan is becoming less isolated. The youth are forgetting the traditions of the culture. It describes how many older Japanese are upset at the fact that many of the young Japanese can not even use chopsticks anymore.

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Children Full of Life (1 of 5)

"In the award-winning documentary Children Full of Life, a fourth-grade class in a primary school in Kanazawa, northwest of Tokyo, learn lessons about compas...
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The Roads to Sata

The Roads to Sata | Learning To Bow: Japanese Education | Scoop.it
ALAN BOOTH'S CLASSIC OF MODERN TRAVEL WRITINGTraveling only along small back roads, Alan Booth traversed Japan's entire length on foot, from Soya at the country's northernmost tip, to Cape Sata in the extreme south, across three islands and some...
Jeffrey Berman's insight:

I intend to read The Roads to Sata. It will probably be more interesting learning about the rural areas of Japan because I already read about life in the urban areas. The book I just finished reading made me very interested in Japanese culture.

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Lessons from Japan’s higher education system

Lessons from Japan’s higher education system | Learning To Bow: Japanese Education | Scoop.it
  From the post-World War 2 era until the late eighties, Japan stood unrivaled as the premier electronics and automobile exporter in the world.
Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The article is about Japanese Universities trying to maintain standards as the population of young people decreases. It talks about Japan's struggles keeping its standards in education high. Because the number of college age people is going down, universities are becoming less selective to keep their profits up.

The article relates to Japan as a whole. The novel talks about Japan's struggle maintain it's traditions as it becomes more open and technologically advanced. Although most Japanese still follow old customs, many of the nations youth are abandoning old philosophies and living more modern lifestyles.

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Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The article summarizes the Japanese education system. The students spend six years in primary school. Then they spend 3 in lower secondary school, and must prepare for the entrance exams into upper secondary schools where they must spend another 3 years. After that they spend 4 years in college.

The part about the lower secondary school relates to my book. The main character teaches English to Japanese 9th graders. One thing he learns about them is that they are under a lot of pressure for the high school entrance exams. They are very serious and disciplined as a result of their stress.

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How to send a letter in Japan

The short answer is, of course, by post. Put your letter in an evelope, write the address, stick some stamps and drop it in the post bin. Yes, sending post is essentially that simple. However there...
Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The article describes how addressing a letter is different in Japan. This is relevant because the main character accidentally adresses a letter wrong in the story. It is explained to him that he didn't give the proper title to the reciever of the letter, so he got it sent back.

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U.S.-Japanese discipline differences delineated

U.S.-Japanese discipline differences delineated | Learning To Bow: Japanese Education | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The article describes the differences in behavior motivation in Japan and the U.S.A. It states that Japanese discipline is based on bad behavior's effect on others, while American discipline is based on fear of punishment. The book states that the Japanese have more discipline than Americans, so this article shows which method is more effective.

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Amazon.com: Learning to Bow: Inside the Heart of Japan (9780060577209): Bruce Feiler: Books

Learning to Bow: Inside the Heart of Japan

~ Bruce Feiler (author) More about this product
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Learning to Bow: Inside the Heart of Japan [Bruce Feiler] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers.
Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The novel, Learning to Bow, is about an American who leaves his home country to teach English in Japan. He has trouble assimilating into Japanese culture, as it is very different from his own. One example is his style of teaching. He style of education involves more interaction than Japanese students are used to, as Japanese middle school classes consist entirely of listening to lectures and taking notes. Because Japan has spent so much of its history in isolation, he sticks out even more as a foreigner. The novel follows him as he learns about things like Japanese etiquette, customs, and education.

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Japanese Education - SPICE

Jeffrey Berman's insight:

The article summarizes the differences between education in Japan and the U.S.A. Among the differences are the 6 more weeks Japanese students attend school, the teaching of moral values, and the completion of textbooks. It also points out that Japanese students are more skilled in mathematics than American students.

The article relates to the book in more than one way. The extra time and completion of textbooks show that the country takes education very seriously. Many students in the book become stressed over school and preparing for tests, showing that they are being challenged by the system. The teaching of morals is also talked about in the book. The schools work hard to teach discipline to their students. This is another purpose of the long hours and difficult work.

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