Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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How Music Can Improve Memory

How Music Can Improve Memory | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Songs and rhymes can be used to remember all kinds of information. A study just published in the journal Memory and Cognition finds that adults learned a new language more effectively when they sang the words instead of spoke them. Even great literature is susceptible to this treatment. Book Tunes, a collaboration between educational entrepreneur Jonathan Sauer and hip-hop artist Andy Bernstein (he performs under the name Abdominal), turns long, wordy books into compact, catchy raps, spoken over an insistent beat.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Music

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 21, 2015 7:22 PM
Songs and rhymes can be used to remember all kinds of information. A study just published in the journal Memory and Cognition finds that adults learned a new language more effectively when they sang the words instead of spoke them. Even great literature is susceptible to this treatment. Book Tunes, a collaboration between educational entrepreneur Jonathan Sauer and hip-hop artist Andy Bernstein (he performs under the name Abdominal), turns long, wordy books into compact, catchy raps, spoken over an insistent beat.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Music

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7 Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic

7 Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are a boatload of awesome Google tools that we use every day. And they’re free, too, which tends to be a big winner for teachers and students. Free is probably the number one reason for giving Google’s tools a try – you haven’t lost anything but a bit of time if you decide you …

Via Beth Dichter
Sharrock's insight:
Beth Dichter's insight:

Google provides so many tools it is hard to keep track of all of them. This post provides information on 7 tools that may find a place in your classroom. 
Would you like to provide audio feedback to your students, or have peers provide audio feedback? If you are using Google Drive this is possible.

Do you have a student that needs a clean and clear space to write, with no distractions? If Chrome is available as a browser consider installing the app Write Space, a "minimalist text editor."

If students are working in Google Drive and are researching a paper they may have found the Research Tool that allows you to quickly search the web for specific information, make suggestions and more.

Google Forms continues to add features, including the ability to create surveys. Have your students design a survey and graph their data, or use it the survey tool to do a quick formative assessment as an exit ticket.

Learn more about Moderator, Image Directory, and Google Templates (that's right, Google has templates designed for students and teachers) in the post. Chances are you will find at least one or two tools to use for yourself or with your students (or both)!

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LibrarianLand's curator insight, March 26, 2014 7:20 PM

More from Google. Maybe useful, but all-knowing. 

Ali Anani's curator insight, March 27, 2014 3:47 AM

Discover delightful Google tools

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 2014 8:12 PM

I love my Google tools! What do you use them for?

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Bias, Blindness and How We Truly Think (Part 2): Daniel Kahneman

Bias, Blindness and How We Truly Think (Part 2): Daniel Kahneman | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In 1738, the Swiss scientist Daniel Bernoulli argued that a gift of 10 ducats has the same utility to someone who already has 100 ducats as a gift of 20 ducats to someone whose current wealth is 200 ducats.
Sharrock's insight:

Theory-Induced Blindness and the introduction to reference points.

Economics Education and models need a face-lift.

 

excerpt: "The mystery is how a conception that is vulnerable to such obvious counterexamples survived for so long. I can explain it only by a weakness of the scholarly mind that I have often observed in myself. I call it theory-induced blindness: Once you have accepted a theory, it is extraordinarily difficult to notice its flaws. As the psychologist Daniel Gilbert has observed, disbelieving is hard work."

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Smart Teacher? Hard Teacher? Passionate Teacher? | Educate Texas

Smart Teacher? Hard Teacher? Passionate Teacher? | Educate Texas | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The discussion on teacher appraisal is heated because states and districts are linking student test scores to teacher performance and using the data to make decisions on pay, promotion, and retention of teachers. These high-stakes consequences can limit useful conversations on the pros and cons of these tools and how they could best be used in practice. There is real pressure, because of legislation in many states and new federal funding streams like Race to the Top, for states and districts to quickly develop and implement appraisal systems that measure teacher effectiveness. The notion that teachers should be held at least partly responsible for how their students achieve makes sense, but what is the best way to do this?

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "How can you assess something as complex as teaching if you have not defined what you should measure? There are three categories in which teacher quality is measured, including (1) teacher qualifications (2) teaching quality and (3) teacher effectiveness. Each category is measured in numerous ways that vary in complexity and validity." 

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Are U.S. Students Ready to Compete? : Education Next

It has been argued that the overall past success of the U.S. economy suggests that high-school math performance is not that critical for sustained growth in economic productivity. After all, U.S. students trailed their peers in the very first international survey undertaken nearly 50 years ago. That is the wrong message to take away however. Other factors contributed to the relatively high rate of growth in economic productivity during the last half of the 20th century, including the openness of the country’s markets, respect for property rights, low levels of political corruption, and limited intrusion of government into the operations of the marketplace. The United States, moreover, has always benefited from the in-migration of talent from abroad.

Sharrock's insight:

For a few days now, I've been wondering about the relationship of a nation's Nobel Prize winners to PISA scores. I finally decided to ask the question in Google. Here's one hit: "Clearly the countries with the worst PISA scores are those with the most impressive Nobel record. Equally significant, the correlation between PISA performance and GDP per capita is, as both Baker and Chang suggest, rather weak (less than 0.5)." http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-fox/are-pisa-scores-really-that-important.

 

But this article also presents an interesting exploration. 

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List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The present list ranks laureates under the country/countries that are stated by the Nobel Prize committee on its website. The list does not distinguish between laureates who got a full prize and the majority who got just a fraction of a prize.

Sharrock's insight:

I wonder if the PISAs offer valid indicators or predictors of military thinking and strategic skills or even for creativity. It strikes me that the USA still has the highest number of Nobel Prize Winners (http://www.whichcountry.co/top-10-countries-with-most-nobel-prize-winners-in-the-world/, orhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_country). I wonder how this is explained? We could look at Nobel Science Winners per capita to consider other measureshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Nobel_laureates_per_capita. We could and should also research innovations and patents in terms of quantity and quality. I'm wondering about the quality of education may have a few more frames with which to really address the true issues of education in public schools (elementary or secondary) or in higher education (colleges and universities). However, this is not research I have done. I think getting to valid and useful answers will need some high levels of research skills and access.  less… 

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Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic

Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Educators, have you ever wondered if your students are really learning when you teach? Soon you’ll have to wonder no more.

Via Grant Montgomery
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We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers?

We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The most dangerous moment in a self-driving car involves no immediate or obvious peril.
Sharrock's insight:

This article could be used for discussions about technology, especially for artificial intelligence, robots, and autonomous vehicles. Questions and challenges.

 

from the article: "Thrust back into control while going full-speed on the freeway, the driver might be unable to take stock of all the obstacles on the road, or she might still be expecting her computer to do something it can't. Her reaction speed might be slower than if she'd been driving all along, she might be distracted by the email she was writing or she might choose not to take over at all, leaving a confused car in command. There's also the worry that people's driving skills will rapidly deteriorate as they come to rely on their robo-chauffeurs."


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Philosophy | William M. Briggs

William M. Briggs - Statistician to the Stars!
Sharrock's insight:

to read, perchance to...understand.

 

I want to read all of the articles here. I haven't though. His confidence in his understanding of statistics is infectious though. Amazing that one of his points is that there is no certainty. Teaching that statistics is a kind of applied epistmeology interests me. 

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For-Profits Dominate Market for Online Teacher Prep

For-Profits Dominate Market for Online Teacher Prep | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Virtual programs are perhaps the fastest-growing sector of teacher preparation. Brick-and-mortar institutions, such as the University of Southern California, are increasingly getting into the action, as well as startups.
Sharrock's insight:

I wonder at what percentages of administrators/schools are hiring teachers who have used this path. Since the e-learning for teacher prep has been around, is it too early for research into this area?

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Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central

Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Perhaps the most pressing challenge that schools face is that of ensuring that all children become competent readers. Young children who experience problems in reading quickly fall behind their more skilled classmates in their ability to decode and comprehend text. This gap in reading skills can emerge as early as first grade-and, once present, tends to be quite stable over time (Stanovich, 1986). First-grade teachers can predict with some confidence, for example, that those children in their classrooms with significant reading deficits by the end of the school year will very likely have continuing difficulties in reading in the fourth grade.

While the long-term negative impact of poor readers can be enormous, the good news is that schools can train their own students to deliver effective tutoring in reading to younger peers. Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual is a complete package for training peer reading tutors. Peer tutoring answers the nagging problem of delivering effective reading support to the many struggling young readers in our schools. Furthermore, peer tutoring programs can improve the reading skills of tutors as well as tutees (Ehly, 1986) and - in some studies-have been shown to build tutor's social skills as well (Garcia-Vazquez & Ehly, 1995). Young children tend to find the opportunity to read aloud to an older peer tutor to be quite reinforcing, adding a motivational component to this intervention.