Writing, Research...
Follow
Find tag "Education"
1.7K views | +4 today
Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sharrock from Learning Analytics in Education
Scoop.it!

Learning analytics don't just measure students' progress – they can shape it

Learning analytics don't just measure students' progress – they can shape it | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
From online forum debates to predictive essay writing software, data showing how students learn can help universities adapt their teaching

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The big steal: rise of the plagiarist in the digital age

The big steal: rise of the plagiarist in the digital age | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Thanks to the internet, it has never been easier to steal other people's work. There's also a high risk you'll be found out. So why do it?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from educational implications
Scoop.it!

How Bill Gates Radically Transformed His Public Speaking And Communication Skills

How Bill Gates Radically Transformed His Public Speaking And Communication Skills | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In an effort to draw attention to global problems,Bill Gates has mastered how to take complex issues and make them easy to understand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning - SEDL Letter, Linking Research and Practice, Volume XXII, Number 2

Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning - SEDL Letter, Linking Research and Practice, Volume XXII, Number 2 | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Research has shown that using data in instructional decisions can lead to improved student performance (Wayman, 2005; Wayman, Cho, & Johnston, 2007; Wohlstetter, Datnow, & Park, 2008). No single assessment can tell educators all they need to know to make well-informed instructional decisions, so researchers stress the use of multiple data sources. Generally, schools collect enormous amounts of data on students’ attendance, behavior, and performance, as well as administrative data and perceptual data from surveys and focus groups. But when it comes to improving instruction and learning, it’s not the quantity of the data that counts, but how the information is used (Hamilton et al., 2009).

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Countries With Most Nobel Prize Winners In the World

Top 10 Countries With Most Nobel Prize Winners In the World | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This article is related to the top 10 countries with most noble prize winners
Sharrock's insight:

I wonder if the PISAs offer valid indicators or predictors of military thinking and strategic skills or even for creativity. It strikes me that the USA still has the highest number of Nobel Prize Winners (http://www.whichcountry.co/top-10-countries-with-most-nobel-prize-winners-in-the-world/, orhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_country). I wonder how this is explained? We could look at Nobel Science Winners per capita to consider other measureshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Nobel_laureates_per_capita. We could and should also research innovations and patents in terms of quantity and quality. I'm wondering about the quality of education may have a few more frames with which to really address the true issues of education in public schools (elementary or secondary) or in higher education (colleges and universities). However, this is not research I have done. I think getting to valid and useful answers will need some high levels of research skills and access.  less… 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library

How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How many times do you hear students in your classroom or library say, “I can’t”? Doesn’t that phrase make you cringe? I always tell students, "Don’t say that because you can,” and help them figure out ways to reach their goals.

Via Pamela D Lloyd
more...
Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, January 22, 1:46 AM

Such useful advice in so many contexts.

 

Now, eat your goldfish crackers!

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble?

What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Knowledge comes into us through a variety of channels that can be blocked by our concern for status, and the successful knowledge-seeker will be one who keeps those channels open. The process requires that we be able to “listen,” either literally or figuratively, to what others say. If what they say shows them to be superior to us in knowledge, we will be hampered in our learning if our first reaction is to try to show that we know as much as they or more. The process also requires that we be corrigible, that we be open to the possibility that our opinions are in some way misguided. If, whenever our status as knowers is threatened by the specter of correction, we feel that we must prove ourselves to have been in the right, we will have closed off an avenue of knowledge and crippled ourselves as inquirers. It can be particularly galling, if one lacks intellectual humility, to be corrected in a public forum; and the galling can obstruct the process of learning.

 
Sharrock's insight:

The most important value for learners is humility, but it should not be considered the only value. Credibility should be held as another value, but also is not the only value of imporance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

DNews: How Pain Works : DNews

DNews: How Pain Works : DNews | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Pain is a pain. Too much of it, and it can really make life hard. But imagine none of it. That can be bad too, as you'd never know if you're hurt. That's the reality for a select few who carry a rare genetic mutation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Five Ways to Change Someone Else's Mind

Five Ways to Change Someone Else's Mind | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are times when you want other people to act or think a certain way - namely, the way you think and act. There's an art to persuasion that begins with a few simple rules. The first comes from
Sharrock's insight:

I often make this mistake and this exerpt, describing this kind of mistake, is powerful: "Make the other person feel right. Don't make them feel wrong. This point might win the prize for what gets ignored most often. Anytime you bully somebody, lord it over them, use your position of authority, or act superior, you are making that person feel wrong. We all feel wrong when we are judged against. We feel right when we are accepted, understood, appreciated, and approved of. (I've met at least one hugely successful executive who built his entire career on making other people feel that they were the most important person in the room.) If you make someone else feel accepted, you have established a genuine bond, at which point they will lower their defenses. If you push someone away instead by making them feel wrong, their defenses will turn twice as strong."


We like to say that there is no place in society for persuasion, but we believe in persuasion. I believe there are times that persuasion is appopriate, justified, or necessary. However, there are those that support the idea that the most effective learning is from the information-seeking dialogue where authority, coercion, manipulation are not employed, and information is shared openly and transparently. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Tech Fest focuses on creative problem-solving - Agoura Hills Acorn

Tech Fest focuses on creative problem-solving Agoura Hills Acorn The Oak Park Library and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, CSUN chapter, will cosponsor Tech Fest from 2 to 5 p.m. Sat., Oct.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

We're All Hypnotized: How to Override Your Automatic Behaviors

You're only conscious of a small fraction of your thoughts, emotions, habits, and choices. The rest of it happens in your brain unconsciously, without any effort on your part. In this way, a lot of us are hypnotized for most of the time.
Sharrock's insight:

How hard is this? I think there is a kind of inertia involved with breaking out of habits and automatic behaviors. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How to Increase Higher Order Thinking | Reading Topics A-Z | Reading Rockets

How to Increase Higher Order Thinking | Reading Topics A-Z | Reading Rockets | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Parents and teachers can do a lot to encourage higher order thinking. Here are some strategies to help foster children's complex thinking.

 

Strategies for enhancing higher order thinking

These following strategies are offered for enhancing higher order thinking skills. This listing should not be seen as exhaustive, but rather as a place to begin.

Take the mystery away

Teach students about higher order thinking and higher order thinking strategies. Help students understand their own higher order thinking strengths and challenges.

Teach the concept of concepts

Explicitly teach the concept of concepts. Concepts in particular content areas should be identified and taught. Teachers should make sure students understand the critical features that define a particular concept and distinguish it from other concepts.

Name key concepts

In any subject area, students should be alerted when a key concept is being introduced. Students may need help and practice in highlighting key concepts. Further, students should be guided to identify which type(s) of concept each one is — concrete, abstract, verbal, nonverbal or process.

Categorize concepts

Students should be guided to identify important concepts and decide which type of concept each one is (concrete, abstract, verbal, nonverbal, or process).

Tell and show

Often students who perform poorly in math have difficulty with nonverbal concepts. When these students have adequate ability to form verbal concepts, particular attention should be given to providing them with verbal explanations of the math problems and procedures. Simply working problems again and again with no verbal explanation of the problem will do little to help these students. Conversely, students who have difficulty with verbal concept formation need multiple examples with relatively less language, which may confuse them. Some students are "tell me" while others are "show me."

Move from concrete to abstract and back

It can be helpful to move from concrete to abstract and back to concrete. When teaching abstract concepts, the use of concrete materials can reinforce learning for both young and old alike. If a person is able to state an abstract concept in terms of everyday practical applications, then that person has gotten the concept.

Teach steps for learning concepts

A multi-step process for teaching and learning concepts may include (a) name the critical (main) features of the concept, (b) name some additional features of the concept, (c) name some false features of the concept, (d) give the best examples or prototypes of the concept (what it is), (e) give some non-examples or non-prototypes (what the concept isn't), and (f) identify other similar or connected concepts.

Go from basic to sophisticated

Teachers should be sure that students have mastered basic concepts before proceeding to more sophisticated concepts. If students have not mastered basic concepts, they may attempt to memorize rather than understand. This can lead to difficulty in content areas such as math and physics. A tenuous grasp of basic concepts can be the reason for misunderstanding and the inability to apply knowledge flexibly.

Expand discussions at home

Parents may include discussions based on concepts in everyday life at home. The subject matter need not relate directly to what she is studying at school. Ideas from reading or issues in local or national news can provide conceptual material (for example, "Do you think a dress code in school is a good idea?").

Connect concepts

Teachers should lead students through the process of connecting one concept to another, and also putting concepts into a hierarchy from small to large. For example, if the concept is "Thanksgiving," a larger concept to which Thanksgiving belongs may be "Holidays," and an even larger (more inclusive) concept could be "Celebrations." By doing this level of thinking, students learn to see how many connections are possible, to connect to what they already know, and to create a web of concepts that helps them gain more clarity and understanding.

Compare the new to the already known. Students should be asked to stop and compare and connect new information to things they already know. For example, if they are about to read a chapter on electricity, they might think about what they already know about electricity. They will then be in a better position to absorb new information on electricity.

Teach inference

Students should be explicitly taught at a young age how to infer or make inferences. Start with "real life" examples. For example, when a teacher or parent tells a child to put on his coat and mittens or to get the umbrella before going outside, the adult may ask the child what that might mean about the weather outside. When students are a little older, a teacher may use bumper stickers or well-known slogans and have the class brainstorm the inferences that can be drawn from them.

Teach Question-Answer Relationships (QARs)

The Question-Answer Relationships (QARs) technique (Raphael 1986) teaches children to label the type of questions being asked and then to use this information to assist them in formulating the answers. Two major categories of question-answer relationships are taught: (1) whether the answer can be found in the text — "In the Book" questions, or (2) whether the reader must rely on his or her own knowledge — "In My Head" questions.

In the book QARs

Right There:
The answer is in the text, usually easy to find; the words used to make up the questions and words used to answer the questions are Right There in the same sentence.

Think and Search (Putting It Together):
The answer is in the story, but the student needs to put together different parts to find it; words for the questions and words for the answers are not found in the same sentences; they come from different parts of the text.

In my head QARs

Author and You:
The answer is not in the story; the student needs to think about what he/she already knows, what the author tells him/her in the text, and how it fits together.

On My Own:
The answer is not in the story; the student can even answer the question without reading the story; the student needs to use his/her own experience.

The QAR technique helps students become more aware of the relationship between textual information and prior knowledge and enable them to make appropriate decisions about which strategies to use as they seek answers to questions. This technique has proven to be especially beneficial for low-achieving students and those with learning differences in the elementary grades (Raphael 1984; Simmonds 1992).

Clarify the difference between understanding and memorizing

When a student is studying, his parents can make sure that he is not just memorizing, but rather attempting to understand the conceptual content of the subject matter. Parents can encourage the student to talk about concepts in his own words. His parents can also play concept games with him. For example, they can list some critical features and let him try to name the concept.

Elaborate and explain

The student should be encouraged to engage in elaboration and explanation of facts and ideas rather than rote repetition. His teachers and parents could have him relate new information to prior experience, make use of analogies and talk about various future applications of what he is learning.

A picture is worth a thousand words

Students should be encouraged to make a visual representation of what they are learning. They should try to associate a simple picture with a single concept.

Make mind movies

When concepts are complex and detailed, such as those that may be found in a classic novel, students should be actively encouraged to picture the action like a "movie" in their minds.

Teach concept mapping and graphic organizers

A specific strategy for teaching concepts is conceptual mapping by drawing diagrams of the concept and its critical features as well as its relationships to other concepts. Graphic organizers may provide a nice beginning framework for conceptual mapping. Students should develop the habit of mapping all the key concepts after completing a passage or chapter. Some students may enjoy using the computer software Inspiration for this task.

Make methods and answers count

To develop problem-solving strategies, teachers should stress both the correct method of accomplishing a task and the correct answer. In this way, students can learn to identify whether they need to select an alternative method if the first method has proven unsuccessful.

Methods matter

To develop problem-solving strategies, teachers should give credit to students for using a step-wise method of accomplishing a task in addition to arriving at the correct answer. Teachers should also teach students different methods for solving a problem and encourage students to consider alternative problem-solving methods if a particular strategy proves unrewarding. It is helpful for teachers and parents to model different problem-solving methods for every day problems that arise from time to time.

Identify the problem

Psychologist Robert Sternberg states that precise problem identification is the first step in problem solving. According t o Sternberg, problem identification consists of (1) knowing a problem when you see a problem and (2) stating the problem in its entirety. Teachers should have students practice problem identification, and let them defend their responses. Using cooperative learning groups for this process will aid the student who is having difficulty with problem identification as he/she will have a heightened opportunity to listen and learn from the discussion of his/her group members.

Encourage questioning

Divergent questions asked by students should not be discounted. When students realize that they can ask about what they want to know without negative reactions from teachers, their creative behavior tends to generalize to other areas. If time will not allow discussion at that time, the teacher can incorporate the use of a "Parking Lot" board where ideas are "parked" on post-it notes until a later time that day or the following day.

Cooperative learning

Many students who exhibit language challenges may benefit from cooperative learning. Cooperative learning provides oral language and listening practice and results in increases in the pragmatic speaking and listening skills of group members. Additionally, the National Reading Panel reported that cooperative learning increases students' reading comprehension and the learning of reading strategies. Cooperative learning requires that teachers carefully plan, structure, monitor, and evaluate for positive interdependence, individual accountability, group processing, face to face interaction, and social skills.

Use collaborative strategic reading

Collaoborative Strategic Reading — CSR (Klinger, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm & Bryant, 2001) is another way to engage students in reading and at the same time improve oral language skills. CSR is an ideal tactic for increasing reading comprehension of expository text in mixed-level classrooms across disciplines. Using this tactic, students are placed into cooperative learning groups of four to six students of mixed abilities. The students work together to accomplish four main tasks: (1) preview (skim over the material, determine what they know and what they want to learn), (2) identify clicks and clunks (clicks = we get it; clunks = we don't understand this concept, idea or word), (3) get the gist (main idea) and (4) wrap up (summarize important ideas and generate questions (think of questions the teacher might ask on a test). Each student in the group is assigned a role such as the leader/involver/taskmaster, the clunk expert, the gist expert, and the timekeeper/pacer (positive interdependence). Each student should be prepared to report the on the group's conclusions (individual accountability).

Think with analogies, similes, and metaphors

Teach students to use analogies, similes and metaphors to explain a concept. Start by modeling ("I do"), then by doing several as a whole class ("We do") before finally asking the students to try one on their own ("You do"). Model both verbal and nonverbal metaphors.

Reward creative thinking

Most students will benefit from ample opportunity to develop their creative tendencies and divergent thinking skills. They should be rewarded for original, even "out of the box" thinking.

Include analytical, practical, and creative thinking

Teachers should provide lesson plans that include analytical, practical and creative thinking activities. Psychologist Robert Sternberg has developed a framework of higher order thinking called "Successful Intelligence." After analyzing successful adults from many different occupations, Sternberg discovered that successful adults utilize three kinds of higher order thinking: (1) analytical (for example, compare and contrast, evaluate, analyze, critique), (2) practical (for example, show how to use something, demonstrate how in the real world, utilize, apply, implement), and (3) creative (for example, invent, imagine, design, show how, what would happen if). Data show that using all three increases student understanding.

Teach components of the learning process

To build metacognition, students need to become consciously aware of the learning process. This changes students from passive recipients of information to active, productive, creative, generators of information. It is important, then for teachers to talk about and teach the components of the learning process: attention, memory, language, graphomotor, processing and organization, and higher order thinking.

Actively teach metacognition

Actively teach metacognition to facilitate acquisition of skills and knowledge. It is important for students to know how they think and learn. Teach students about what Robert Sternberg calls successful intelligence or mental self-management. Successful intelligence is a great way to explain metacognition.

In his book entitled Successful Intelligence, Sternberg lists six components of successful intelligence:

Know your strengths and weaknessesCapitalize on your strengths and compensate for your weaknessesDefy negative expectationsBelieve in yourself. This is called self-efficacySeek out role models — people from whom you can learnSeek out an environment where you can make a differenceUse resources

Several resource books by Robert Sternberg are available on higher order thinking. The following books should be helpful and are available at local bookstores or online.

Successful Intelligence by Robert J. SternbergTeaching for Successful Intelligence by Robert J. Sternberg and Elena L. GrigorenkoTeaching for Thinking by Robert J. Sternberg and Louise Spear-SwerlingConsider individual evaluation

Many students with higher order thinking challenges benefit from individual evaluation and remediation by highly qualified professionals.

Make students your partners

A teacher should let the student with higher order thinking challenges know that they will work together as partners to achieve increases in the student's skills. With this type of relationship, often the student will bring very practical and effective strategies to the table that the teacher may not have otherwise considered.

Back to top

Evaluation/Assessment

If consistent use of some of the above strategies does not seem to help a student, it may be worthwhile to consider having a comprehensive neurodevelopmental evaluation conducted by a qualified professional. Problem identification is the first step in problem solution; thus, if the problem is not accurately identified, the solutions that are attempted often will not reap rewards for the student and those working with him.

A comprehensive neurodevelopmental evaluation performed by a licensed psychologist should serve as the roadmap for parents, students and professionals working with the student. It should provide a complete picture of his attention, memory, oral language, organization, graphomotor/handwriting skills and higher order thinking. It should also include an assessment of the student's academic skills (reading, written language and math) and his social and emotional functioning. The evaluation should not only provide an accurate diagnosis but also descriptive information regarding the areas of functioning noted above.

When seeking professional services for an evaluation, it is important to understand what constitutes a good evaluation and also the purpose of the evaluation. Evaluations conducted by public school systems are generally for the purpose of determining whether a student meets criteria for a special education classification. Evaluations conducted by many private professionals are performed for the purpose of determining whether the student meets diagnostic criteria according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) published by the American Psychiatric Association. While both of these types of evaluations are helpful in their own ways, they are generally not sufficient for providing the best roadmap. Therefore, parents should be informed consumers and ask questions about what kind of information they will walk away with after the evaluation has been completed.

The focus of an evaluation should be to address concerns and provide answers to specific questions asked by the parents and the student, and to identify the underlying causes of problems. For example, if the student has problems with reading comprehension, is it because she cannot decode the words, she has insufficient fluency or vocabulary, or she cannot understand discourse because of difficulty with attention or memory? It should also identify the student's strengths as well as challenges and specific strategies for managing these challenges.

A good evaluation should glean information from multiple sources such as interviews, questionnaires, rating scales and standardized tests. Contact CDL for more information about neurodevelopmental evaluations at (504) 840-9786 or learn@cdl.org.

Sharrock's insight:

This is one site that seems to explain what educators (including parents) do.

 

How can we design websites and e-Learning platforms to do this with non-adults? adults?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Critical Thinking Skills and Japan
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking: Ways to Improve Your Child’s Mind

Critical Thinking: Ways to Improve Your Child’s Mind | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


Via Gust MEES, Frank Carbullido
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, March 31, 2013 12:04 PM

 

A MUST read and watch the videos ALSO!!!

 

Rescooped by Sharrock from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

7 Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic

7 Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are a boatload of awesome Google tools that we use every day. And they’re free, too, which tends to be a big winner for teachers and students. Free is probably the number one reason for giving Google’s tools a try – you haven’t lost anything but a bit of time if you decide you …

Via Beth Dichter
Sharrock's insight:
Beth Dichter's insight:

Google provides so many tools it is hard to keep track of all of them. This post provides information on 7 tools that may find a place in your classroom. 
Would you like to provide audio feedback to your students, or have peers provide audio feedback? If you are using Google Drive this is possible.

Do you have a student that needs a clean and clear space to write, with no distractions? If Chrome is available as a browser consider installing the app Write Space, a "minimalist text editor."

If students are working in Google Drive and are researching a paper they may have found the Research Tool that allows you to quickly search the web for specific information, make suggestions and more.

Google Forms continues to add features, including the ability to create surveys. Have your students design a survey and graph their data, or use it the survey tool to do a quick formative assessment as an exit ticket.

Learn more about Moderator, Image Directory, and Google Templates (that's right, Google has templates designed for students and teachers) in the post. Chances are you will find at least one or two tools to use for yourself or with your students (or both)!

more...
LibrarianLand's curator insight, March 26, 7:20 PM

More from Google. Maybe useful, but all-knowing. 

Ali Anani's curator insight, March 27, 3:47 AM

Discover delightful Google tools

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 8:12 PM

I love my Google tools! What do you use them for?

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Bias, Blindness and How We Truly Think (Part 2): Daniel Kahneman

Bias, Blindness and How We Truly Think (Part 2): Daniel Kahneman | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In 1738, the Swiss scientist Daniel Bernoulli argued that a gift of 10 ducats has the same utility to someone who already has 100 ducats as a gift of 20 ducats to someone whose current wealth is 200 ducats.
Sharrock's insight:

Theory-Induced Blindness and the introduction to reference points.

Economics Education and models need a face-lift.

 

excerpt: "The mystery is how a conception that is vulnerable to such obvious counterexamples survived for so long. I can explain it only by a weakness of the scholarly mind that I have often observed in myself. I call it theory-induced blindness: Once you have accepted a theory, it is extraordinarily difficult to notice its flaws. As the psychologist Daniel Gilbert has observed, disbelieving is hard work."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Smart Teacher? Hard Teacher? Passionate Teacher? | Educate Texas

Smart Teacher? Hard Teacher? Passionate Teacher? | Educate Texas | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The discussion on teacher appraisal is heated because states and districts are linking student test scores to teacher performance and using the data to make decisions on pay, promotion, and retention of teachers. These high-stakes consequences can limit useful conversations on the pros and cons of these tools and how they could best be used in practice. There is real pressure, because of legislation in many states and new federal funding streams like Race to the Top, for states and districts to quickly develop and implement appraisal systems that measure teacher effectiveness. The notion that teachers should be held at least partly responsible for how their students achieve makes sense, but what is the best way to do this?

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "How can you assess something as complex as teaching if you have not defined what you should measure? There are three categories in which teacher quality is measured, including (1) teacher qualifications (2) teaching quality and (3) teacher effectiveness. Each category is measured in numerous ways that vary in complexity and validity." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Are U.S. Students Ready to Compete? : Education Next

It has been argued that the overall past success of the U.S. economy suggests that high-school math performance is not that critical for sustained growth in economic productivity. After all, U.S. students trailed their peers in the very first international survey undertaken nearly 50 years ago. That is the wrong message to take away however. Other factors contributed to the relatively high rate of growth in economic productivity during the last half of the 20th century, including the openness of the country’s markets, respect for property rights, low levels of political corruption, and limited intrusion of government into the operations of the marketplace. The United States, moreover, has always benefited from the in-migration of talent from abroad.

Sharrock's insight:

For a few days now, I've been wondering about the relationship of a nation's Nobel Prize winners to PISA scores. I finally decided to ask the question in Google. Here's one hit: "Clearly the countries with the worst PISA scores are those with the most impressive Nobel record. Equally significant, the correlation between PISA performance and GDP per capita is, as both Baker and Chang suggest, rather weak (less than 0.5)." http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-fox/are-pisa-scores-really-that-important.

 

But this article also presents an interesting exploration. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The present list ranks laureates under the country/countries that are stated by the Nobel Prize committee on its website. The list does not distinguish between laureates who got a full prize and the majority who got just a fraction of a prize.

Sharrock's insight:

I wonder if the PISAs offer valid indicators or predictors of military thinking and strategic skills or even for creativity. It strikes me that the USA still has the highest number of Nobel Prize Winners (http://www.whichcountry.co/top-10-countries-with-most-nobel-prize-winners-in-the-world/, orhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_country). I wonder how this is explained? We could look at Nobel Science Winners per capita to consider other measureshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Nobel_laureates_per_capita. We could and should also research innovations and patents in terms of quantity and quality. I'm wondering about the quality of education may have a few more frames with which to really address the true issues of education in public schools (elementary or secondary) or in higher education (colleges and universities). However, this is not research I have done. I think getting to valid and useful answers will need some high levels of research skills and access.  less… 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Learning Analytics in Education
Scoop.it!

Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic

Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Educators, have you ever wondered if your students are really learning when you teach? Soon you’ll have to wonder no more.

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers?

We've Built Driverless Cars. Can We Build Their Drivers? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The most dangerous moment in a self-driving car involves no immediate or obvious peril.
Sharrock's insight:

This article could be used for discussions about technology, especially for artificial intelligence, robots, and autonomous vehicles. Questions and challenges.

 

from the article: "Thrust back into control while going full-speed on the freeway, the driver might be unable to take stock of all the obstacles on the road, or she might still be expecting her computer to do something it can't. Her reaction speed might be slower than if she'd been driving all along, she might be distracted by the email she was writing or she might choose not to take over at all, leaving a confused car in command. There's also the worry that people's driving skills will rapidly deteriorate as they come to rely on their robo-chauffeurs."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Philosophy | William M. Briggs

William M. Briggs - Statistician to the Stars!
Sharrock's insight:

to read, perchance to...understand.

 

I want to read all of the articles here. I haven't though. His confidence in his understanding of statistics is infectious though. Amazing that one of his points is that there is no certainty. Teaching that statistics is a kind of applied epistmeology interests me. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

For-Profits Dominate Market for Online Teacher Prep

For-Profits Dominate Market for Online Teacher Prep | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Virtual programs are perhaps the fastest-growing sector of teacher preparation. Brick-and-mortar institutions, such as the University of Southern California, are increasingly getting into the action, as well as startups.
Sharrock's insight:

I wonder at what percentages of administrators/schools are hiring teachers who have used this path. Since the e-learning for teacher prep has been around, is it too early for research into this area?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central

Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Perhaps the most pressing challenge that schools face is that of ensuring that all children become competent readers. Young children who experience problems in reading quickly fall behind their more skilled classmates in their ability to decode and comprehend text. This gap in reading skills can emerge as early as first grade-and, once present, tends to be quite stable over time (Stanovich, 1986). First-grade teachers can predict with some confidence, for example, that those children in their classrooms with significant reading deficits by the end of the school year will very likely have continuing difficulties in reading in the fourth grade.

While the long-term negative impact of poor readers can be enormous, the good news is that schools can train their own students to deliver effective tutoring in reading to younger peers. Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual is a complete package for training peer reading tutors. Peer tutoring answers the nagging problem of delivering effective reading support to the many struggling young readers in our schools. Furthermore, peer tutoring programs can improve the reading skills of tutors as well as tutees (Ehly, 1986) and - in some studies-have been shown to build tutor's social skills as well (Garcia-Vazquez & Ehly, 1995). Young children tend to find the opportunity to read aloud to an older peer tutor to be quite reinforcing, adding a motivational component to this intervention.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

A Visual Guide To Every Single Learning Theory - Edudemic

A Visual Guide To Every Single Learning Theory - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This detailed analysis and chart of every single learning theory is worth zooming in and studying.
Sharrock's insight:

I love charts and graphs, especially when you can zoom in on the particulars.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Critical Thinking Skills and Japan
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking and Modern Japan: Conflict in the Discourse of Government and Business

Abstract:  This paper examines the public discourses of Japanese government and business interests on the subject of critical thinking within education. It begins by examining the dilemma critical thinking can pose to states and organisations with the emphasis it places on reasoned nonconformity. While nonconformity can be important in a post-industrial business context where fresh ideas and innovation provide the impetus for profit, it can also pose potential difficulties for organisational stability, as people choose to reject established ways of thinking or behaving. In twenty-first century Japan, this dilemma can clearly be seen in public policy statements made on education. On the one hand, the impact of globalised competition has led to a demand from government and business circles for a new kind of graduate, able to exercise independent judgement skills unbound by conventional thinking. On the other hand, they also express fears that the increasing individualism displayed by young people is threatening the social order and leading Japan towards an undesirable future. Their apparent solution to this dilemma is the re-introduction of patriotic and moral education, aimed at reaffirming the pre-war values of social duty and national solidarity.

 


Via Frank Carbullido
more...
No comment yet.