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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
Curated by Sharrock
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Quackwatch Mission Statement

Quackwatch Mission Statement Quackwatch is an international network of people who are concerned about health-related frauds, myths, fads, fallacies, and misconduct. Its primary focus is on quackery-related information that is difficult or impossible to get elsewhere. Founded by Dr. Stephen Barrett in 1969 as the Lehigh Valley Committee Against Health Fraud (Allentown, Pennsylvania), it was incorporated in 1970. In 1997, it assumed its current name and began developing a worldwide network of volunteers and expert advisors
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Are Child Molesters Really the Most Hated People in Prison?

Are Child Molesters Really the Most Hated People in Prison? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A Pennsylvania judge released accused child molester Jerry Sandusky on $100,000 bail on Monday. The decision keeps Sandusky out of the reach of prison inmates, who have a reputation for attacking child molesters. Are molesters really the most reviled people in prison? Yes. In the social hierarchy of prison inmates,...
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Artificial intelligence is the next big thing for hedge funds seeking an edge

Artificial intelligence is the next big thing for hedge funds seeking an edge | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The AI being developed by Aidyia can ingest vast amounts of data, including news and social media. It uses its reasoning powers to recognize connections and patterns in the data. It uses those patterns to make predictions about the market, which it translates into buy and sell orders—all without any direct human involvement. What could go wrong?
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Three Stooges - Dopey Dicks

Watch the video «Three Stooges - Dopey Dicks» uploaded by DwightFrye on Dailymotion.
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Play Doesn't End With Childhood: Why Adults Need Recess Too

Play Doesn't End With Childhood: Why Adults Need Recess Too | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"Play is something done for its own sake," he explains. "It's voluntary, it's pleasurable, it offers a sense of engagement, it takes you out of time. And the act itself is more important than the outcome."

So, let's take gambling, for instance. A poker player who's enjoying a competitive card game? That's play, says Brown. A gambling addict whose only goal is to hit the jackpot? Not play.

Brown says that children have a lot to learn from what he calls this "state of being," including empathy, how to communicate with others, and how to roll with the punches.

"Those kinds of resilient learning processes [are] different than what occurs in adult play," he says. "But the harmonics of this occur in adulthood as well."

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Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain

Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education. Most of the hypnosis interventions for chronic pain include instructions in self-hypnosis. However, there is a lack of standardization of the hypnotic interventions examined in clinical trials, and the number of patients enrolled in the studies has tended to be low and lacking long-term follow-up. Implications of the findings for future clinical research and applications are discussed.

 
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Wonder - A New Search Engine by Experts in the Field

Wonder - A New Search Engine by Experts in the Field | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"Wonder is a research engine fueled by experts. Explore results contributed by real people, and let our research network filter for you. It's like scanning the bookshelves of people you admire, and having a librarian help you."


Via Beth Dichter, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 22, 4:46 PM

Check out this new search engine called Wonder. Wonder is a 'human-centric' search engine. People who are knowledgeable in the field recommend resources. In fact, if you have a special area you need researched you may enter a 'ticket' explaining what you are looking for and researchers will "email you back high quality resources ASAP."

The search engine is free to use, but you must create a log-in (three choices available).

Once you enter your search terms items will appear with a small visual and some text. You may choose to save any item (and like or share an item). You may also request additional information (see note above) and the list of contributors is viewable allowing you to filter results by reviewer.

There are so many websites that students find that are not the best. This search engine would be great for students still learning how to search, or as a way to potentially see if the sites they find are also listed by Wonder. Take some time to explore and consider sharing this with students (I would suggest high school, and possibly middle school).

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About Liberty Fund - Online Library of Liberty

Liberty Fund, Inc. is a private, educational foundation established in 1960 to encourage the study of the ideal of a society of free and responsible individuals. The Foundation develops, supervises, and finances its own educational activities to foster thought and encourage discourse on enduring intellectual issues pertaining to liberty.

This is done through the implementation of different programs:

Each year, Liberty Fund conducts over 150 conferences throughout the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe.
Liberty Fund publishes about 10 - often classic - books each year. There is an online catalog where these books can be ordered.
Liberty Fund has produced video and audio tapes including The Intellectual Portrait Series of videotapes and DVDs which records conversations with some of the most significant thinkers of our time.
These programs focus on the place individual liberty has in an intellectual heritage evident from ancient times and continuing through our own times. The programs are intended to enrich understanding and appreciation of the complex nature of a society of free and responsible individuals and to contribute to its preservation.

Liberty Fund also sponsors the following websites:

Liberty Fund’s main website
The Online Library of Liberty
Library of Economics and Liberty
Online Library of Law & Liberty
As a tax-exempt, private operating foundation, Liberty Fund’s purposes are educational. It does not, therefore, engage in political action of any kind. It fulfills its mission by conducting programs, not by awarding grants to outside organizations or individuals.
Sharrock's insight:

shared via@E.L. Beck

 

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Why the Food Babe is wrong (it's not just because she's ignorant)

Why the Food Babe is wrong (it's not just because she's ignorant) | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
On the face of it, a basic message to eat less processed food and improve the nutritional content of restaurants’ menus is something that I and many other scientists and health advocates could totally get behind. (I see from a quick visit to her facebook page that several of my very rational friends “like” her). But actually Ms. Hari’s mission and tactics aggressively promote pseudoscience. Besides being anti-vaccine, and even anti-microwave oven, she campaigns against all chemicals in food, famously saying “When you look at the ingredients [in food], if you can’t spell it or pronounce it, you probably shouldn’t eat it,” and “There is just no acceptable level of chemical to ingest, ever.”*
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The true essence of scientific research | Machines Like Us

The true essence of scientific research | Machines Like Us | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
On April 18th, 2013, Rep. Lamar Smith, chairman of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, demonstrated complete ignorance of the nature of scientific research. As Chairman of the committee, Rep.

Via Antonio Figueiredo
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Antonio Figueiredo's curator insight, August 27, 2013 9:15 AM

Is trivial research realy trivial? 

Maria João Loureiro's curator insight, August 28, 2013 12:26 PM

Uma opinião relevante sobre o que é fazer investigação (ainda que os exemplos não sejam das ciências sociais) e dos "enganos" das atuais políticas de financiamento. Recomendo vivamente!!!

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12 Fabulous Academic Search Engines

12 Fabulous Academic Search Engines | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Via Antonio Figueiredo
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Publishing: Credit where credit is due

Publishing: Credit where credit is due | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Liz Allen, Amy Brand, Jo Scott, Micah Altman and Marjorie Hlava are trialling digital taxonomies to help researchers to identify their contributions to collaborative projects.

Via Antonio Figueiredo
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Antonio Figueiredo's curator insight, April 20, 2014 3:43 AM

New taxonomy lets individual contributions in multiple-author texts be known (Nature)

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That Catcalling Video and Why “Research Methods” is such an Exciting Topic (Really!)

That Catcalling Video and Why "Research Methods" is such an Exciting Topic (Really!) - The Message - Medium
And Why All Data Needs Theory

Via Antonio Figueiredo
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Antonio Figueiredo's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:33 AM

On the Importance of Research Methods and on Why All Data Needs Theory. 

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Which of the 11 American nations do you live in?

Which of the 11 American nations do you live in? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A fascinating new look at the cultural differences between the 11 nations that make up North America. Colin Woodard, a reporter at the Portland Press Herald and author of several books, says North America can be broken neatly into 11 separate nation-states, where dominant cultures explain our voting behaviors and attitudes toward everything from social issues to the role of government.
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Subjects & Concepts - Writing Commons

Subjects & Concepts - Writing Commons | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Writing Commons is a free, comprehensive, peer-reviewed,
award-winning Open Text for students and faculty in college-level courses that require writing and research.
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Does Your Language Shape How You Think?

Does Your Language Shape How You Think? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The idea that your mother tongue shapes your experience of the world may be true after all.

IN WHAT OTHER WAYS might the language we speak influence our experience of the world? Recently, it has been demonstrated in a series of ingenious experiments that we even perceive colors through the lens of our mother tongue. There are radical variations in the way languages carve up the spectrum of visible light; for example, green and blue are distinct colors in English but are considered shades of the same color in many languages. And it turns out that the colors that our language routinely obliges us to treat as distinct can refine our purely visual sensitivity to certain color differences in reality, so that our brains are trained to exaggerate the distance between shades of color if these have different names in our language. As strange as it may sound, our experience of a Chagall painting actually depends to some extent on whether our language has a word for blue.

In coming years, researchers may also be able to shed light on the impact of language on more subtle areas of perception. For instance, some languages, like Matses in Peru, oblige their speakers, like the finickiest of lawyers, to specify exactly how they came to know about the facts they are reporting. You cannot simply say, as in English, “An animal passed here.” You have to specify, using a different verbal form, whether this was directly experienced (you saw the animal passing), inferred (you saw footprints), conjectured (animals generally pass there that time of day), hearsay or such. If a statement is reported with the incorrect “evidentiality,” it is considered a lie. So if, for instance, you ask a Matses man how many wives he has, unless he can actually see his wives at that very moment, he would have to answer in the past tense and would say something like “There were two last time I checked.” After all, given that the wives are not present, he cannot be absolutely certain that one of them hasn’t died or run off with another man since he last saw them, even if this was only five minutes ago. So he cannot report it as a certain fact in the present tense. Does the need to think constantly about epistemology in such a careful and sophisticated manner inform the speakers’ outlook on life or their sense of truth and causation? When our experimental tools are less blunt, such questions will be amenable to empirical study.

For many years, our mother tongue was claimed to be a “prison house” that constrained our capacity to reason. Once it turned out that there was no evidence for such claims, this was taken as proof that people of all cultures think in fundamentally the same way. But surely it is a mistake to overestimate the importance of abstract reasoning in our lives. After all, how many daily decisions do we make on the basis of deductive logic compared with those guided by gut feeling, intuition, emotions, impulse or practical skills? The habits of mind that our culture has instilled in us from infancy shape our orientation to the world and our emotional responses to the objects we encounter, and their consequences probably go far beyond what has been experimentally demonstrated so far; they may also have a marked impact on our beliefs, values and ideologies. We may not know as yet how to measure these consequences directly or how to assess their contribution to cultural or political misunderstandings. But as a first step toward understanding one another, we can do better than pretending we all think the same.

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Scientific research | Hypnosis.Tools

Scientific hypnosis research
There has been over a century of careful scientific study of hypnosis. Researchers, typically in the fields of psychology & medicine, have been interested in finding out what hypnosis is, how it works, and how effective it is as a clinical treatment. Some of the first scientists to become interested in studying hypnosis were doctors (notably Liebault and Coue at the Nancy school, and Charcot and Janet at Salpetriere) who developed theories to explain what they saw. In the twentieth century there were teams researching hypnosis at top American universities including Harvard and Stanford, as well as in top English and European universities. Modern hypnosis research tends to be more divided along academic and clinical lines.
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This Writing Exercise Will Get You Unstuck Every Time

This Writing Exercise Will Get You Unstuck Every Time | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Sometimes, you just stare at the screen. You want to write but have no idea what to say. Here's a writing exercise that will get you writing every time.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 24, 11:44 PM

This makes sense. A strategy I use is to have some proofread my writing and then work at integrating what they provide as feedback. It often gets me started.

 

@ivon_ehd1

SageRave's curator insight, April 25, 1:32 PM

Another writers block treatment. Enjoy!

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About The Founders' Constitution

Hailed as "the Oxford English Dictionary of American constitutional history," the print edition of The Founders' Constitution has proved since its publication in 1986 to be an invaluable aid to all those seeking a deeper understanding of one of our nation's most important legal documents.

 

In this unique anthology, Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner draw on the writings of a wide array of people engaged in the problem of making popular government safe, steady, and accountable. The documents included range from the early seventeenth century to the 1830s, from the reflections of philosophers to popular pamphlets, from public debates in ratifying conventions to the private correspondence of the leading political actors of the day.

 

These rich and varied materials are arranged, first, according to broad themes or problems to which the Constitution of 1787 has made a significant and lasting contribution. Then they are arranged by article, section, and clause of the U.S. Constitution, from the Preamble through Article Seven and continuing through the first twelve Amendments. Those seeking additional information and guidance should consult "A Reader's Advisory" and the "Introduction".

 

The Founders' Constitution was first published in 1986 in five oversized volumes with more than 3,200 double-column pages. Both this clothbound edition and a new CD-ROM edition are available from the University of Chicago Press. A new paperbound edition of the set is now available from the Liberty Fund, whose collaboration has made both this Web site and the CD-ROM edition possible.

 

About the Editors

Philip B. Kurland was the William R. Kenan, Jr., Distinguished Service professor in the College and professor in the University of Chicago Law School. Ralph Lerner is the Benjamin Franklin Professor in the College and professor in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.

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Mike Ferguson reviews Making Poetry Happen

Mike Ferguson reviews Making Poetry Happen | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

“ 'Making Poetry Happen is a fundamental resource for all English teachers for the way if collates both thinking about and exemplifying the practice of getting students to write poetry.' Mike ...”


Via Mark G Kirshner
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Why Have Kids?

Why Have Kids? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A Pew Research Center study from 2010 found that 20 percent of American women now end their childbearing years without having borne a child, compared to 10 percent in the 1970s. During that time, the public has become more accepting of these women, but 38 percent of Americans surveyed for that study felt this trend was bad for society. When it comes to some other changes to the American family — such as marrying someone of a different race or women working outside the home — the public has said in greater numbers that those trends were good for or at least didn’t harm society.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "In advance of the Zócalo event, “Why Have Kids?”, we asked a panel of experts: If Americans have come to accept a range of non-traditional family structures, why does a woman’s choice not to have children still elicit skepticism and judgment?"

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