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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Caltech Adopts Open Access Policy for Scholarly Writing - Campus Technology

Caltech Adopts Open Access Policy for Scholarly Writing - Campus Technology | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Caltech Adopts Open Access Policy for Scholarly Writing
Campus Technology
With the beginning of the new year, California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has implemented a new open-access policy for the scholarly writing done by its faculty.

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Chaos in Central African Republic is about power, not religion - Christian Science Monitor

Chaos in Central African Republic is about power, not religion - Christian Science Monitor | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Christian Science Monitor Chaos in Central African Republic is about power, not religion Christian Science Monitor The country is at least 50 percent Christian, evenly divided between Protestant and Catholic, approximately 35 percent traditional...


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How Many People Do I Need to Take My Survey? | SurveyMonkey Blog

How Many People Do I Need to Take My Survey? | SurveyMonkey Blog | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Great question! And we’ve got a handy-dandy table with the answers. To use the table, just ask yourself two questions: How many people are in your populati
Sharrock's insight:

Great information! It's probably one of the big ones for schools issuing surveys to their community members and stakeholders.

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The Fashionable Non-Conformist: Being Different for the Sake of Being Different

It's important to deviate from society sometimes, but we have to be careful not to become a fashionable non-conformist.
Sharrock's insight:

This is the key to being authentic. You should speak and behave because you genuinely have those beliefs, values, and preferences. 

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FedStats

FedStats provides easy access to statistics and information produced by more than 100 U.S. Federal Government agencies
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A misunderstood statistic: 22 military veteran suicides a day

A misunderstood statistic: 22 military veteran suicides a day | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In most discussions of suicide and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan — including the online buzz that followed publication of a Times analysis on how young California veterans die — one statistic gets repeated most: 22 veterans kill themselves...

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Bill Bentley's curator insight, December 22, 2013 5:33 AM

Excellent example of misleading and irresponsibly reported statistics, this one on a sad topic.  Failing to understand data like this can lead to bad policy decisions.  

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Data Visualization: The Way to Save Big Data From the Naysayers - Jeff Morris | Big Data Republic

Data Visualization: The Way to Save Big Data From the Naysayers - Jeff Morris | Big Data Republic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
With focus, you can leave your competition mired in the big data wilderness.

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How Social Networks Adapt and Evolve

How Social Networks Adapt and Evolve | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Before you pick the social network to work through you need to understand its basic concept.

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Darin Stevenson's curator insight, December 27, 2013 4:34 PM

We need to be creating these networks for each other, not moving into Potemkin villages organized to shrive us of each other and the intelligence we produce together.

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A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism

A Model of Functional Brain Connectivity and Background Noise as a Biomarker for Cognitive Phenotypes: Application to Autism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

We present an efficient approach to discriminate between typical and atypical brains from macroscopic neural dynamics recorded as magnetoencephalograms (MEG). Our approach is based on the fact that spontaneous brain activity can be accurately described with stochastic dynamics, as a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (mOUP). By fitting the data to a mOUP we obtain: 1) the functional connectivity matrix, corresponding to the drift operator, and 2) the traces of background stochastic activity (noise) driving the brain. We applied this method to investigate functional connectivity and background noise in juvenile patients (n = 9) with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and compared them to age-matched juvenile control subjects (n = 10). Our analysis reveals significant alterations in both functional brain connectivity and background noise in ASD patients. The dominant connectivity change in ASD relative to control shows enhanced functional excitation from occipital to frontal areas along a parasagittal axis. Background noise in ASD patients is spatially correlated over wide areas, as opposed to control, where areas driven by correlated noise form smaller patches. An analysis of the spatial complexity reveals that it is significantly lower in ASD subjects. Although the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying these alterations cannot be determined from macroscopic brain recordings, we speculate that enhanced occipital-frontal excitation may result from changes in white matter density in ASD, as suggested in previous studies. We also venture that long-range spatial correlations in the background noise may result from less specificity (or more promiscuity) of thalamo-cortical projections. All the calculations involved in our analysis are highly efficient and outperform other algorithms to discriminate typical and atypical brains with a comparable level of accuracy. Altogether our results demonstrate a promising potential of our approach as an efficient biomarker for altered brain dynamics associated with a cognitive phenotype. (...) - by Dominguer LG et al., PLoS ONE 8(4): e61493


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Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic

Grades 2.0: How Learning Analytics Are Changing The Teacher's Role - Edudemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Educators, have you ever wondered if your students are really learning when you teach? Soon you’ll have to wonder no more.

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How about translation? This programme is so good!

How about translation? This programme is so good! | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

English, German, Italian or maybe Arabic... try this successful translations : Bing's app!


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30-Something Everyday Tasks You Might Be Doing 'Wrong'

30-Something Everyday Tasks You Might Be Doing 'Wrong' | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A post on the site Quora.com got at least one user to change his approach to several common tasks.
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Innovation at Marvel Comics | Loyalty360.org

Innovation at Marvel Comics | Loyalty360.org | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Kristin Vincent, VP, Product at Marvel Entertainment, has been helping the 70-year old company re-define itself in the digital age.
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Why Everyone Seems to Have Cancer

Why Everyone Seems to Have Cancer | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
As heart disease and stroke are beaten back, cancer vies to become the final killer.

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Heather Swift's curator insight, January 7, 12:25 PM

Our apparent losses in the "war against cancer" might just mean that people aren't dying of other things, says George Johnson.

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✬✎The Challenge of Citation in Digital Media

✬✎The Challenge of Citation in Digital Media | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

 

We can pick up a style guide like those published by the MLA, APA or Chicago and expect that it will tell us exactly how to format our text, as well as how to formally credit the sources we are referring to.

 

These formats have become so ubiquitous in academic communication, particularly in the classroom, that they seem like divine Law set in stone, rules that we must follow or face the consequences.

 

How, then, do we handle digital media projects, where standards are not so clearly set, and where standard style guides do not seem to be clearly adaptable to visual or aural media?

 

This set-in-stone quality to citation style in print, writing researchers have found, may have some unintended consequences for students.

 

An ongoing research project led by Rebecca Moore Howard and Sandra Jameson, called the Citation Project, has collected essays from nearly 180 students from 16 institutions, and studied their habits of citation.

 

What the researchers have found in the first stage of their project is that students are generally disengaged with the sources that they cite, and that more often than not, students are engaged in "quotation mining" in order to superficially meet assignment requirements.

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Instead of trying to impose a print standard format for citation on a medium for which it might not be appropriate, it is better to work from these wider principles and practices that underlie citation to develop formats that are:

Appropriate to the media in which students are composingAppropriate to the contexts and audiences of the assignmentsAppropriate to the forms of inquiry in which students are engaging

 

 

➤ The Role of Citation in Academic Inquiry

↨ Displaying knowledge of the topic...

 

↨ Establishing ownership of ideas...

 

↨ Positioning own ideas in relation to others'...

 

↨ Establishing a replicable methodology:..

 

 

➤ Adapting Citation Forms to New Media...

 

 

➤ Considerations for Developing Appropriate Citation Guidelines in New Media Assignments...

↨ Consider the affordances and constraints of the media in which your students are composin

 

↨ Consider the audience and genre of the assignment.

 

↨ Create communities of practice within your class.

 

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/1eIZSe6

 


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Mhd.Shadi Khudr's comment, January 10, 8:05 AM
Kindest regards
Mhd.Shadi Khudr's comment, March 29, 9:41 AM
Cheers
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Are You Data Driven? Take a Hard Look in the Mirror.

Are You Data Driven? Take a Hard Look in the Mirror. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The term "data driven" is penetrating the lexicon ever more deeply these days.

 

Traits of the Data-Driven

The data-driven:

Make decisions at the lowest possible levelBring as much diverse data to any situation as they possibly can.Use data to develop a deeper understanding of their worlds.Develop an appreciation for variationDeal reasonably well with uncertaintyIntegrate their ability to understand data and its implications and their intuitions.Recognize the importance of high-quality data and invest to improve.Are good experimenters and researchers.Recognize that decision criteria can vary with circumstances.Recognize that making a decision is only step one.Work hard to learn new skills and bring new data and new data technologies (big data, predictive analytics, metadata management, etc) into their organizations.Learn from their mistakes.
Sharrock's insight:

While reading Thinking, Fast and Slow, I have decided to avoid using intuition and to employ my imagination instead. I do learn from my mistakes, I do bring as much diverse data to any situation as possible, and I regularly deal well with uncertainty. I consider myself data-driven to some degree, since I have not brought data technologies into my organizaiton (but I'm learning about data and data technologies).

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Patient Harm: When An Attorney Won’t Take Your Case

Patient Harm: When An Attorney Won’t Take Your Case | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Studies show that nine of 10 patients seeking a medical malpractice attorney won’t find one — women, children and the elderly in particular.
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Cloudy With a Chance of Beer

Cloudy With a Chance of Beer | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Weather Company’s Vikram Somaya talks about why marketers are clamoring for weather data.

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Bill Bentley's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 AM

I mostly liked the title of this article!   The article itself isn't dramatic or weird but it's easy to read, sensible and shows how knowledge of weather affects consumer decisions.   It's interesting that we can predict consumer behavior with large data sets that have nothing to do with the consumers themselves.

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Facts about Data Visualization | Visualisation of Data

Facts about Data Visualization | Visualisation of Data | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
What is Data Visualization ? Why is it important for your business ? How can you maximize Data Visualization impact ? Here are some facts about this.

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'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics

'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In their computer simulations of human evolution, scientists have discovered the emergence of the “homo socialis” with “other-regarding” preferences.

Via Viktor Markowski, Ashish Umre, Michael Holder
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:49 PM

Economics has a beautiful body of theory. But does it describe real markets? Doubts have come up not only in the wake of the financial crisis, since financial crashes should not occur according to the then established theories. Since ages, economic theory is based on concepts such as efficient markets and the “homo economicus”, i.e. the assumption of competitively optimizing individuals and firms. It was believed that any behavior deviating from this would create disadvantages and, hence, be eliminated by natural selection. But experimental evidence from behavioral economics show that, on average, people behave more fairness-oriented and other-regarding than expected. A new theory by scientists from ETH Zurich now explains why. 

luiy's curator insight, March 25, 2013 2:33 PM

Evolution of “friendliness”


Prof. Dirk Helbing of ETH Zurich, who coordinated the study, adds: “Compared to conventional models for the evolution of social cooperation, we have distinguished between the actual behavior – cooperation or not – and an inherited character trait, describing the degree of other-regarding preferences, which we call the friendliness.” The actual behavior considers not only the own advantage (“payoff”), but also gives a weight to the payoff of the interaction partners depending on the individual friendliness. For the “homo economicus”, the weight is zero. The friendliness spreads from one generation to the next according to natural selection. This is merely based on the own payoff, but mutations happen.

For most parameter combinations, the model predicts the evolution of a payoff-maximizing “homo economicus” with selfish preferences, as assumed by a great share of the economic literature. Very surprisingly, however, biological selection may create a “homo socialis” with other-regarding preferences, namely if offsprings tend to stay close to their parents. In such a case, clusters of friendly people, who are “conditionally cooperative”, may evolve over time.

If an unconditionally cooperative individual is born by chance, it may be exploited by everyone and not leave any offspring. However, if born in a favorable, conditionally cooperative environment, it may trigger cascade-like transitions to cooperative behavior, such that other-regarding behavior pays off. Consequently, a “homo socialis” spreads.

 

 

Networked minds create a cooperative human species


“This has fundamental implications for the way, economic theories should look like,” underlines Professor Helbing. Most of today’s economic knowledge is for the “homo economicus”, but people wonder whether that theory really applies. A comparable body of work for the “homo socialis” still needs to be written.

While the “homo economicus” optimizes its utility independently, the “homo socialis” puts himself or herself into the shoes of others to consider their interests as well,” explains Grund, and Helbing adds: “This establishes something like “networked minds”. Everyone’s decisions depend on the preferences of others.” This becomes even more important in our networked world.

 

 

A participatory kind of economy


How will this change our economy? Today, many customers doubt that they get the best service by people who are driven by their own profits and bonuses. “Our theory predicts that the level of other-regarding preferences is distributed broadly, from selfish to altruistic. Academic education in economics has largely promoted the selfish type. Perhaps, our economic thinking needs to fundamentally change, and our economy should be run by different kinds of people,” suggests Grund. “The true capitalist has other-regarding preferences,” adds Helbing, “as the “homo socialis” earns much more payoff.” This is, because the “homo socialis” manages to overcome the downwards spiral that tends to drive the “homo economicus” towards tragedies of the commons. The breakdown of trust and cooperation in the financial markets back in 2008 might be seen as good example.

“Social media will promote a new kind of participatory economy, in which competition goes hand in hand with cooperation,” believes Helbing. Indeed, the digital economy’s paradigm of the “prosumer” states that the Internet, social platforms, 3D printers and other developments will enable the co-producing consumer. “It will be hard to tell who is consumer and who is producer”, says Christian Waloszek. “You might be both at the same time, and this creates a much more cooperative perspective.”

Onearth's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:58 AM

After homo sapiens sapiens it's time for homo sapiens socialis

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Teens aren’t abandoning “social.” They’re just using the word correctly. — Understandings & Epiphanies — Medium

Advertisers are perplexed and a little angst-y.

I know this, because I work in advertising.

Via Darin Stevenson
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Darin Stevenson's curator insight, January 2, 8:05 AM

What this means is that teens are demonstrating a mode of intelligence that the adults »cannot muster.

And more: they know the difference between cohesion and being separated into little packs of diseases. How do they know?

Because that is what we do to them all day, every day.

Social media: We are doing it WRONG.

“Social” is what happens when someone posts personal information—photos, thoughts, announcements, favorite songs, jokes—on the internet and another person comes along and clicks a thumbs up icon or a star or a heart. If someone’s really “social,” they’ll even type a comment or reply.

Kids aren’t leaving social networks. They’re redefining the word “social.” Rather, they’re actually using the word with the intent of its original meaning: making contact with other human beings. Communicating. Back-and-forth, fairly immediate dialogue. Most of it digitally. But most of it with the intent of a conversation where two (or more) people are exchanging information and emotion. Not posting it. Exchanging it.”

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When You Criticize Someone, You Make It Harder for that Person to Change

When You Criticize Someone, You Make It Harder for that Person to Change | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The defensive brain is not the listening-and-learning brain.

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, January 5, 8:45 AM

Encouragement is always better than criticism.  Focusing on that as opposed to negative traits leads to a positive school and classroom environment.

Elizabeth Hutchinson's comment, January 5, 9:24 AM
I always find Encouragement seems to find a positive attitude. I too am more likely to do more if encouraged, so I suppose it works both ways :)
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Getting Away from the Norm: How to Start a Business with Just Your Writing Skills

Getting Away from the Norm: How to Start a Business with Just Your Writing Skills | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Thanks to the Internet, writing has taken a new meaning. It’s the content creators (with elaborate and continuous focus on writing or creating content) that succeed on the web today.


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How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World | NPR.org

How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World | NPR.org | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Lera Boroditsky once did a simple experiment: She asked people to close their eyes and point southeast. A room of distinguished professors in the U.S. pointed in almost every possible direction, whereas 5-year-old Australian aboriginal girls always got it right.

 

She says the difference lines in language. Boroditsky, an associate professor of cognitive science at the University of California, San Diego, says the Australian aboriginal language doesn't use words like left or right. It uses compass points, so they say things like "that girl to the east of you is my sister."

 

If you want to learn another language and become fluent, you may have to change the way you behave in small but sometimes significant ways, specifically how you sort things into categories and what you notice.

 

Researchers are starting to study how those changes happen, says Aneta Pavlenko, a professor of applied linguistics at Temple University. She studies bilingualism and is the author of an upcoming book on this work.

 

If people speaking different languages need to group or observe things differently, then bilinguals ought to switch focus depending on the language they use. That's exactly the case, according to Pavlenko.

 

For example, she says English distinguishes between cups and glasses, but in Russian, the difference between chashka (cup) and stakan (glass) is based on shape, not material.

 

Based on her research, she started teaching future language teachers how to help their English-speaking students group things in Russian. If English-speaking students of Russian had to sort cups and glasses into different piles, then re-sort into chashka and stakan, they should sort them differently. She says language teachers could do activities like this with their students instead of just memorizing words.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Ollin Ollin's comment, March 5, 8:03 PM
fascinating!
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Why Ending Malaria May Be More About Backhoes Than Bed Nets

Why Ending Malaria May Be More About Backhoes Than Bed Nets | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The successful campaign to wipe out malaria in the U.S. offers lessons on how to stop it globally.
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