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Police 'foreign crime wave' falsehoods fuel racism

Police 'foreign crime wave' falsehoods fuel racism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
These Community pages have reported many times on how the National Police Agency (NPA) has manufactured the illusion of a 'foreign crime wave,' depicting non-Japanese (NJ) as a threat to ...

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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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Xenopsychology

First of all, what exactly do we mean by "emotion"? There is much disagreement on this, but one of the most useful definitions, by psychologist Magda Arnold, draws a careful distinction between states and behaviors. In Arnold's theory emotional experience proceeds in three steps: (1) Perception and appraisal (external stimulus is perceived and judged good, bad, useful. harmful, etc., mostly based on learned associations); (2) Emotion (internal state of arousal or "feeling" arises, involving physiological effects); then (3) Action (specific behavior such as approach, avoidance, attack, or feeding, depending on emotional intensity, learned behavioral patterns, and other motivations simultaneously present). In this view emotion is an internal state, not a behavior or a perception of external reality.
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The Visitor From Planet X

The Visitor From Planet X | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This is the idea behind CosmicOS (link is external) (“cosmic operating system”), in which we send not merely messages but programs to other civilizations. The programs will be able to interact with their curious alien inquisitors, and would—in theory—supplement the information that could be provided in a message. They might offer a simulation of some part of our ecosystem, for example. According to the CosmicOS website (link is external), an alien user “is free to play around with the simulated world and understand its logic through experimentation.”

Naturally there’s a lot of assumptions being made here. The aliens will have computers; the aliens will understand that the message is a computer program; the aliens will be able to translate it into code that actually runs on their computers, or create an emulator that runs the code as is. If you can get past all that—voila!
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Top 10 Strange Phenomena of the Mind - Listverse

Top 10 Strange Phenomena of the Mind - Listverse | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The mind is a wonderful thing – there is so much about it which remains a mystery to this day. Science is able to describe strange phenomena, but can not account for their origins. While most of us are familiar with one or two on this list, many others are mostly unknown outside of the psychological realm. This is a list of the top ten strange mental phenomena.We have all some experience of a feeling, that comes over us occasionally, of what we are saying and doing having been said and done before, in a remote time – of our having been surrounded, dim ages ago, by the same faces, objects, and circumstances – of our knowing perfectly what will be said next, as if we suddenly remember it! – Charles Dickens
Sharrock's insight:

This is one of the many ways we can wake from the illusion of being a conscious self. When you realize there is nothing supernatural about the experiences, you realize that somehow, a network got desynchronized or....something.

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Machine Learning Startup Finds Investment Cues in Satellite Images | MIT Technology Review

Machine Learning Startup Finds Investment Cues in Satellite Images | MIT Technology Review | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Orbital Insight is using deep learning to find financially useful information in aerial imagery.
Sharrock's insight:
"To predict retail sales based on retailers’ parking lots, humans at Orbital Insights use Google Street View images to pinpoint the exact location of the stores’ entrances. Satellite imagery is acquired from a number of commercial suppliers, some of it refreshed daily. Software then monitors the density of cars and the frequency with which they enter the lots." (excerpt)
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Demystifying the muse: 5 creativity myths you need to stop believing

Demystifying the muse: 5 creativity myths you need to stop believing | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There’s a letter from an 1815 issue of General Music Journal where Mozart describes his creative process as instantaneous: no struggle or writer’s block. The muse simply showed up and he was ready. The problem? The letter is a fraud. Much like […]

Via Beth Dichter
Sharrock's insight:

haven't read. will read later.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 4, 5:36 AM

Are we born creative or can we learn to be creative? New research provides insights into creativity, and this post looks at five myths that many of us have about creativity. The five myths are listed below, and they are explained in depth in the post.

1. Creativity is something you're born with

2. You can't control when inspiration will strike

3. You can't learn to be creative

4. Creativity happens in isolation (the myth of the lone creator)

5. Creativity comes to those with time and means

There are many resources that are included in this post. You may also find some ideas on ways to help your students learn to become more creative, and you as well.

Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Infographic: Useful phrases for expressing argumentation | EAP Infographics

Infographic: Useful phrases for expressing argumentation | EAP Infographics | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Today's post offers five of the most common sentence structures that we see in argumentative writing.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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An Ethical Checklist for Robot Journalism | Mediashift | PBS

An Ethical Checklist for Robot Journalism | Mediashift | PBS | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
News organizations are experimenting increasingly with robot journalism, using computer programs to transform data into news stories, or news stories into multimedia presentations.

Most uses of robot journalism have been for fairly formulaic situations — company earnings reports, stock market summaries, earthquake alerts and youth sports stories. But inevitably, news companies will be testing automatic news writing on more challenging subjects.

What are the ethics of robot journalism? When editors consider using automated news writing, what issues of accuracy, quality and transparency arise?

Via Jeff Domansky
Sharrock's insight:

How would we cite this machine-author resource in research? 

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 4, 11:52 PM

Need for concern or just another unstoppable trend and evolution?

Rescooped by Sharrock from Writers & Books
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The Rise of the Nameless Narrator in Fiction

The Rise of the Nameless Narrator in Fiction | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In recent years, a curious number of novelists have declined to avail themselves of a basic prerogative: naming their creations.


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50 Of The Best Google Chrome Extensions For Teachers | Listly List

50 Of The Best Google Chrome Extensions For Teachers | Google Translate for Google+, Pocket (formerly Read It Later), Docs PDF/PowerPoint Viewer (by Google), Google Calendar Checker, Docs PDF/PowerPoint Viewer (by Google), Clip to Evernote, Lastpass, Readability, Feedly, and Buffer - A Smarter Way to Share on Social Media

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The Impact Character: Why Every Character Arc Needs One - Helping Writers Become Authors

The Impact Character: Why Every Character Arc Needs One - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
“Impact character” is the term coined by Dramatica authors Melanie Anne Phillips and Chris Huntley to describe what is just as accurately termed by editor Roz Morris the “catalyst character.” This is the character who slams into your protagonist, catalyzes him into change, and has a major impact on his life.
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On producing art: Your Brain on a Beautiful Story | The American Conservative http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/brain-beautiful-story/ via @amconmag

Sharrock's insight:
This article should not be dismissed as a criticism of christian movies and literature. It should be read as a more focused exploration dogma's place in The Arts, especially focusing on the virtues of showing, not telling.
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New approach to math helping Arizona high school students graduate

New approach to math helping Arizona high school students graduate | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Technical students are enrolling in classes like automotive math.
The classes are as difficult as other fourth year math classes but help students apply the concepts.
There is a shortage of certified math teachers for technical math classes.
Sharrock's insight:

"When I saw that I could apply it (math) to things ... I had the drive to learn it," Johnson said.

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How To Use Google Voice Commands In Google Drive ~ Edudemic ~ by Aiden Wolfe

How To Use Google Voice Commands In Google Drive ~ Edudemic ~ by Aiden Wolfe | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Since its inception, Google Drive has been a source of excitement for innovation-minded educators. However, as with any new teaching technology, you may find yourself thinking “it sounds intriguing, but will it really make a difference?” In regards to Drive features like audio feedback, the answer to that question is an unequivocal yes. Aside from offering convenience and helping spare teachers from endless amounts of typing, the addition of voice commenting brings with it profound benefits to the learning experience as a whole. Below, you’ll find five compelling reasons to give it a try, as well as a simple guide on how to get started.

Via Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Does Creativity have its Dark Side?

Does Creativity have its Dark Side? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Malevolent creativity is aimed toward destructive consequences only. From committing acts of criminal activity or serial murder to terrorism, the malevolently creative seek to attack targets, invoke fear, and assert their power. In addition, just as creativity can be eminent (with a capital “C”), so malevolent creativity can also take an everyday form in which it’s practiced in ordinary circumstances. The malevolently creative attempt to manipulate others to their own ends, create mischief just for the sake of creating mischief, and try to deceive the people closest to them.
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Chasing Down Facts: Tips for Novelists about Police Procedure | Live Write Thrive

Chasing Down Facts: Tips for Novelists about Police Procedure | Live Write Thrive | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Insights, inspiration, and practical advice for writers
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War Porn: Hollywood Has Been Making the Same Movie About American War for 75 Years | Mother Jones

War Porn: Hollywood Has Been Making the Same Movie About American War for 75 Years | Mother Jones | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The enemy changes, but the script stays the same. Wandering around YouTube recently, I stumbled across some good old government-issue propaganda. It was a video clearly meant to stir American emotions and prepare us for a long struggle against a determined, brutal, and barbaric enemy whose way of life is a challenge to the most basic American values. Here's some of what I learned: our enemy is engaged in a crusade against the West; wants to establish a world government and make all of us bow down before it; fights fanatically, beheads prisoners, and is willing to sacrifice the lives of its followers in inhuman suicide attacks. Though its weapons are modern, its thinking and beliefs are 2,000 years out of date and inscrutable to us.
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Geis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Geis

This article is about the taboo in Irish mythology. For the band, see Geasa (band). A geis can be compared with a curse or, paradoxically, a gift. If someone under a geis violates the associated taboo, the infractor will suffer dishonor or even death.

In Irish mythology and folklore, a geis (/ˈɡɛʃ/; [ˈɟɛʃ]; plural geasa) is an idiosyncratic taboo, whether of obligation or prohibition, similar to being under a vow or spell. The Scottish Gaelic spelling "geas" is also common.[1]

 

 

 

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Being sensitive to sound could be the key to intellectuals' creativity - Daily Mail

Being sensitive to sound could be the key to intellectuals' creativity - Daily Mail | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Being overly sensitive to sound could have been the key to the creativity of geniuses like Charles Darwin (pictured) and Franz Kafka, scientists at Northwestern University, Illinois, believe.
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Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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The Daily Routine Of Creativity -

The Daily Routine Of Creativity - | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Daily Routine Of Creativity by TeachThought Staff What sort of habits lead to creativity? Well, we first have to imagine these kinds of habits as causal–that is, the habits cause the creativity, rather than...

Via Adrian Bertolini, Lynnette Van Dyke
Sharrock's insight:

This is nice to use to support whatever style and habits you use to create. We all need our magic feathers to motivate and encourage us towards completing unstructured tasks. It strikes me though that the chart says nothing definite at all. Some of the creatives had "day jobs", some did not. Some were literary creatives while others were musical or  were visual/2-D artists while others still are philosophers. Then there are the one or two scientists (depending on how you describe the method Freud uses compared to Darwin's method).

 

What is missing? How do we characterize "creative work"? Is this only the production part of the creativity or does it include the creative's research? For example, many writers research by reading the works of of others to explore how certain effects are achieved. Others research into how certain characters might have achieved the social/emotional/intellectual points they have achieved. Domain-specific creativity may have commonalities within the domains. We are not seeing what these are by ignoring the "work" or "study" of creativity. I will have to read the study cited here.

 

In other words, other than the suggestion that we should suspend our disbelief and critical thinking skills to accept that "Well, we first have to imagine these kinds of habits as causal–that is, the habits cause the creativity, rather than the reverse", there really doesn't appear to be any obvious takeaways that support the statement that you need rest, exercise, and creative activity. Mozart didn't need exercise apparently. Neither did Franklyn nor O'Connor nor Balzac (and there are others). I would consider Franklyn, O'Connor, and Mozart as the genius's geniuses. Although I have no idea who Corbusier is--I'll have to Google him/her--I can't see why we are being directed to this chart as though it is evidence supporting anything. The disclaimer basically says the same thing: "Disclaimer: The above info doesn’t characterize the entire life of each person but a specific period of time as recorded in diaries, letters and other documentation." If you are someone on the lookout for the narrative fallacy, this would set off flags. 


But I know how it can happen that the summary of a document leaves out the important points and methodology, including a larger population size charted out possibly. It might indicate that the authors read the much larger document, and assumed that the summary was enough.


I will have to read the larger document. The summary was not enough.


I am interested in the topic though. I am on the lookout for studies that explore the influence of daily schedules and habits on creative productivity. 

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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, March 8, 7:07 PM

Fascinating to see how some of the world's most creative individuals structured their day

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Preventative Care

Preventative Care | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Regarding lovesickness, there are certain activities that are extremely dangerous, such as reading dirty books, listening to music, playing viols, lutes, and other instruments—and even more, going to
Sharrock's insight:

"Regarding lovesickness, there are certain activities that are extremely dangerous, such as reading dirty books, listening to music, playing viols, lutes, and other instruments—and even more, going to plays and farces, balls and dances, for such exercises open up the pores of the heart no less than those of the skin." (excerpt)

 
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Rescooped by Sharrock from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Avoid These 20 English Words When in Other Countries

Avoid These 20 English Words When in Other Countries | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
If you travel abroad frequently for work, or if you have an e-commerce store with customers from all over the world, it’s worth noting that there are a number of English words that, phonetically, don’t work in other countries and can lead to double entendre or unintended offence territory. Here are 20 of them to help you ensure that your communication isn’t lost in translation.

See also:  9 Words or Phrases Millennials Should Avoid Using in the Workplace

France
Preservative. Avoid asking about preservatives in France; you’ll probably be met with strange looks. It means ‘condom’ in France.

Norway
Pick. If you’re visiting Norway, don’t use the word ‘pick’. Your Norwegian colleague is unlikely to be impressed - it means ‘dick’ over there.

Fitter. Does your business specialise in fitness products? Be mindful that in Norway, the word ‘fitte’ refers to a woman’s genitals.

Turkey
Peach. Going to Turkey? Avoid asking for a peach in the supermarket or anywhere else for that matter. It means ‘bastard’ in Turkish.

Germany
Gift. ‘Never look a gift horse in the mouth’, we’re told; perhaps more so in Germany where the word means ‘poison’.

Latte. In Germany, latte doesn’t mean the frothy, milky concoction you get from your local Starbucks. It means ‘erect penis’ in some German quarters.

Korea
Salsa. Out for a Mexican in Korea? It’s probably best not to ask for salsa: it means ‘diarrhoea’ in Korean.

Sweden
Speed. Try not to talk about speed when in the company of others in Sweden. It means ‘fart’.

Bump.  If you’ve had the misfortune of a bump on your car, note that the word ‘bump’ in Swedish means ‘dump’.

Speed bump.  Put the above two words together and you have the phrase ‘speed bump’, which in Swedish means fart dump.

Kiss. If you ask your Swedish host or hostess for a kiss, they might very well direct you to the toilets. In Swedish, the word means ‘pee’.

Portugal
Pay Day. If you’re in Portugal, refrain from singing with happiness that it’s ‘pay day’. No one will be impressed. In Portuguese it means “I farted”.

Exquisite. Extend a compliment to your Portuguese host by describing something belonging to them as ‘exquisite’ and you might be met with askance looks: ‘esquisito’ in Portuguese means ‘weird’.

Hungary
Cookie. If you’re visiting Hungary, whether on business or for pleasure, avoid asking for a cookie. It means ‘small penis’ in Hungarian.

Japan
Jerry. It’s perhaps a little late for Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, but if you’re in Japan, avoid using the word – it means ‘diarrhoea’ over there.

France
Bra. Do you sell luxury underwear? Whilst you and I might initially understand the word to mean a garment that covers the breasts, if you’re in France your French colleagues might think you’re selling arms. Literally.

Italy
Tremendous. Refrain from boasting about the tremendous prices you offer your clients. In this country, ‘tremendo’ is the word for ‘terrible’.

Netherlands
Bill.  Asking for the bill might raise a few guffaws in the Netherlands: ‘bil’ means ‘buttocks’ there.

Lager. It might confuse your Dutch colleagues if you were to ask for a ‘lager’ when having a few drinks with them after work. Lager means ‘storage’ in Dutch.

Spain
Cool.  The word cool is too close for comfort to the Spanish word 'culo'; a crude term for 'bum'. Best avoided. 

...

See also: How to Take Advantage of Your Native Language Working in a Foreign Country

That some words can be misinterpreted not only has relevance for those who frequently go abroad on business,  but as Tictail point out, also for online businesses where ‘borderless’ transactions take place. So if you’ve often wondered why your “exquisite Madagascan chocolates” fly like hotcakes everywhere in the world except Brazil and Portugal, perhaps you now have the answer: weird, dodgy chocolates just won’t sell.

 

Via Charles Tiayon
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Words of Praise For Microfilm, An Overlooked But Essential Library Tool

Words of Praise For Microfilm, An Overlooked But Essential Library Tool | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Said the Muncie Public Library:

One of our most valuable pieces of technology are our microfilm machines. Most technologies have a huge throwaway culture surrounding them—smartphones are obsolete after a year or less—but microfilm has staying power. According to Archives.gov: "Microfilm is a low-cost,reliable, long-term, standardized image storage medium. The equipment needed to view microfilm images is simple, consisting of light and magnification. The medium has a life-expectancy of hundreds of years."

... Our digital microfilm machine has the added benefit of providing greater control over "cleaning up" the quality of the archived image compared to traditional microfilm readers. The software allows users to control the brightness/contrast/sharpness of individual sections of the page. If a photo on a page is too dark but the text on the page is too light, for example, the user can select the image and text separately and customize the image settings of those sections independently to improve the clarity of the overall image. This is especially useful when trying to read the oldest newspapers.
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How to Figure Out WHAT Your Character's Arc Should Be - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Figure Out WHAT Your Character's Arc Should Be - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Picking the character's arc that's perfect for your story requires nothing more than the answers to three questions.
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Hearing metaphors activates brain regions involved in sensory experience

Hearing metaphors activates brain regions involved in sensory experience | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
"We see that metaphors are engaging the areas of the cerebral cortex involved in sensory responses even though the metaphors are quite familiar," says senior author Krish Sathian, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, rehabilitation medicine and psychology at Emory University. "This result illustrates how we draw upon sensory experiences to achieve understanding of metaphorical language."
Sharrock's insight:

"George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, in their landmark work 'Metaphors we live by', ...argued that metaphor comprehension is grounded in our sensory and motor experiences."

 
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The Science of Sensory Marketing

The Science of Sensory Marketing | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
“In the past, communications with customers were essentially monologues—companies just talked at consumers,” Krishna says. “Then they evolved into dialogues, with customers providing feedback. Now they’re becoming multidimensional conversations, with products finding their own voices and consumers responding viscerally and subconsciously to them.”
Sharrock's insight:

Imagine if these findings found their ways into classrooms. For example, what if, on the first day of school, during introductions, students were given something warm to drink while discussing class expectations and general learning objectives?