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These Maps Show Just How Segregated NYC Really Is

These Maps Show Just How Segregated NYC Really Is | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
New York City may be one of the most diverse cities in the world, but it's also one of the most segregated cities in the United States.
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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The Many Faces of Empathy - World of Psychology

The Many Faces of Empathy - World of Psychology | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

While empathy doesn’t come in as many varieties as are found in the cereal aisle, it is no more uniform than it is universal. Empathy is generally understood as the ability to appreciate the ideas and feelings of another, even if those ideas or feelings are different from one’s own.

 

It is also volitional — I have to put on someone else’s shoes to be able to walk around in them awhile.

 

Empathy is generally understood as the ability to appreciate the ideas and feelings of another,

even if those ideas or feelings are

different from one’s own.

 

By SUSAN DONNELLY 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Sharrock's curator insight, December 19, 2:54 PM

This statement says a lot: "Empathy requires that we suspend our own judgments and emotions about a situation or person, and attempt to walk in their shoes, hence the more volitional aspect of true empathy."


This points to the skill-aspect of empathy. What do you do to redirect or turn off your judgments and emotions? We seem to naturally jump to conclusions and judge the actions and decisions of others, so this restraint is somewhat unnatural. The book Crucial Conversations offers a number of actions to take in order to overcome these impulses, but it is also clear that tiredness and stress will make such mental acrobatics difficult to even consider using. There are aikido-like mental moves to reframe discussions or to focus on different goals, but it is clear that a certain amount of training is necessary before one can become competent or to master such skills. The "staying in the moment" processes of being present also has some promise. 

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10 Great Books for a Writer's Wish List

10 Great Books for a Writer's Wish List | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Whether you're a teacher, an author, a budding writer, or someone who writes in secret for personal reasons, you've got writing wishes.

Here are 10 great books for your wish list, to stir your writing dreams or help make them a reality. (Bonus: includes suggestions for how to best approach reading each title!)



1. On Being a Writer: 12 Simple Habits for a Writing Life that Lasts, by Ann Kroeker and Charity Singleton Craig. This brand-new book is a must-have for career writers, whether seasoned or just starting out. Two editors with long-time careers have teamed up to share their wise, witty stories that will help you craft a lasting writing life--one that feels sustainable, while potentially putting money in your pocket (or discovery in your soul).

How to Read: Straight through, for the inspiring and helpful stories. Then use the prompts and discussion questions to teach a workshop (the book actually grew out of a writing workshop setting), guide a writing group, or embark on your own 12-week experience. Expect to find yourself and your best writing rhythms and approaches.



2. Several short sentences about writing, by Verlyn Klinkenborg. Here is a book that understands the ways we come to write poorly and encourages us to transcend this outcome through nitty-gritty ways of thinking, being, and acting. Structured as short sentences, it reads almost like a poem. (I am partial to poetry, so this is a plus, to my mind!)

How to Read: Daily, as a kind of meditative experience that can deliver short helpings of wisdom. Or, for a take-me-away poetic kind of experience, read in longer stretches when you're looking for some space.



3. Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction, by Tracy Kidder and Richard Todd. For writers who've got their sights set on producing for outlets like The Atlantic, this is a must-read. First, it will set the standard you'll realize you need to reach, in terms of writing-complexity. Then it will help you understand the way such publications work (through giving you the mindset and process as told by Kidder and Todd).

How to Read: The book bogs down at about the halfway point, but this is not a problem. It is completely worth your time to read it halfway through, to get the viewpoint and stories of two top editors with long-time careers. Teachers can surely use the opening stories as part of a writing class.



4. The Novelist: A Novella, by L.L. Barkat. This book is a literary experience that delves into the issue of voice and volition in the writer. The opening scene finds the main character on the floor, sure that she might die of writer's block. Of course, as with most writers, the "block" is not her real problem, just a symptom of it. Layered with other writing stories like Mary Shelley's (through the lens of Frankenstein), Murasaki's (through The Tale of Genji) and Vargas Llosa's (through Letters to a Young Novelist), the main character is propelled to a journey of self-discovery that is accompanied by tea, travels into her past, and poetry.

How to Read: Straight through on a weekend when you're looking for a thoughtful diversion. Then go back and consider the many layers of myth, literary wit, and story wisdom. (One reviewer notes: "I have marked this book more than any other I have ever read. I have underlined, questioned, re-read and come back to certain paragraphs so many times over that I have actually broken the spine attempting to connect the dots between chapters. I eventually gave up and purchased magnetic page holders that allow me to mark two different sections at once.")



5. The Right to Write, by Julia Cameron. This writer is a veteran across genres, from fiction, to nonfiction, to screenwriting. Passionate, poetic, and persistent, Cameron will not stop until she helps you free your voice. Pulling from concepts she introduced in The Artist's Way, the book promises a path of disentanglement from the forces that sometimes keep us down as writers and artists. Includes simple, emotion-laden poetry and questions to ponder.

How to Read: Excellent for use in a writer's group that's looking for life-type inspiration as much as it's searching for writing advice. Use the guiding questions, or just discuss. There's plenty to engage, for those interested in taking a personal journey.



6. Spin: Taking Your Creativity to the Nth Degree, by Claire Burge. Not strictly a writing title, one teacher-reviewer swears she will never teach a writing class again without this book on board. Based on stories of South African life and later an entrepreneurial career seated in Dublin, this book is a lively writing of surprising creativity stories that are both poignant and sometimes quite amusing. Also, fully illustrated.

How to Read: Dip in to the stories day by day, for quick spurts of delight and vision. Do the writing prompts, or don't. The real take-away from this book is the vitality it will make you long for and then give you practical ways to pursue. (Includes organizers and intriguing productivity tips you probably haven't seen elsewhere.)



7. The Writing Life, by Annie Dillard. Now approaching the status of "classic," this book is worth re-reading and giving away. The deep insights, charged images, and strangely witty stories will challenge you to take your writing to the next level (or despair of ever getting there, but that is certainly not the intent). From wood-chopping to spontaneously-combusting typewriters, Dillard gives a picture of the writing life that you cannot easily forget, especially if you're interested in being a literary writer.

How to Read: With a fire extinguisher by your side.



8. The Faraway Nearby, by Rebecca Solnit. Memoir-based, this book will take you on a writer's journey through the life of Solnit, who struggles to come to terms with her mother's personality and progressive dementia. Images that will stay with you: the apricots on the bedroom floor, the maze, mirrors of all kinds. This is a hard book, but beautiful, that taps into primal feelings about stories and delves into their purposes, both communal and intensely personal.

How to Read: You cannot read this book quickly, due to the poetic complexity of the prose, the depth of thought, and the struggle embedded in its themes. Take it slowly, and don't worry about your pace. Bring it along on a retreat, or create a retreat of your own over a series of weekend reads. If you are not in the mood for rumination, exchange it for another title, without guilt.



9. The Things They Carried, by Tim O'Brien. Love a good war story? I don't. But this is one of my all-time favorite books. Poetic and dramatic (in the best sense of the word), this weaving and re-weaving of a war experience through ever-changing (but oddly converging) stories will uncover the true nature of Story and ask you to reconsider your own approaches to both reading and writing a tale. Because the book plays with the nature of truth, it's also an interesting companion to Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude or Esquivel's Like Water for Chocolate.

How to Read: A quick read, this book can benefit from being retraced and highlighted--especially the passages on truth and story. Gather these passages into a journal and ponder, or use them to jump start a class or writing group discussion.



10. The Poetry Home Repair Manual, by Ted Kooser. Designed for poets, this is absolutely one of the best books on how to write accessible poems that work. From thoughts about crafting better poem titles, to usable tips on how to choose the best details, to thoughts on rule-breaking, and much more, Kooser's advice is something you can immediately put into practice. Beyond that, his quiet humor will make you smile and his poem choices will help you see exactly what your task is if you're interested in making better poems of your own.

How to Read: With a pen in hand. (You're sure to almost immediately want to try his advice on for size.) Writer's groups could tackle a section together, as could classrooms, though you'll have to make your own way. (No specific prompts included.)

Oky, that's my list of great writer's books, amidst a market of many. What's your favorite writing title? Share with us in the comments.

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Samsung Gear VR review: Oculus goes mobile

Samsung Gear VR review: Oculus goes mobile | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
When we met with Oculus VR earlier this year, the team mentioned that future versions of the Rift headset could skip the PC, and instead use mobile devices for brains. Now we see what they were cooking up.
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The Triangle of Love

The Triangle of Love | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Needless to say, when trying to discuss “love” with another person, it’s an iffy proposition as to whether or not you’ll be talking about the same thing.  So how is one to know if it’s love he’s (she’s) feeling for his partner?  Are there different types of love?  Are there different degrees of love?  These are very important questions, not only when there is a question about whether love is present, but also when trying to define the type and degree of love one is trying to find.
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The American Experience | The Duel | Dueling, American Style

The American Experience | The Duel | Dueling, American Style | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

DuelLike many early American customs, dueling was imported. Starting in the Middle Ages, European nobles had defended their honor in man-to-man battles. An early version of dueling was known as "judicial combat," so called because God allegedly judged the man in the right and let him win. In an era known for its bloody encounters, judicial combats probably prevented men from killing in the heat of passion. Still, numerous authorities, including heads of state and the Catholic Church, banned dueling -- with little effect.

Sharrock's insight:

Duels make no sense to us 21st century people. We use the courts or we blog the hell out of someone if they challenge our honor, our character, our manhood, or or if someone slanders us. What put an end to this practice though? It wasn't the law. It wasn't even the Church. It was public opinion and the Civil War. 

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Covering Miami’s Rising Seas: Sensors, Public Data & Politics | Mediashift | PBS

Covering Miami’s Rising Seas: Sensors, Public Data & Politics | Mediashift | PBS | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Over the “past half-century,” The Washington Post reported in October, “average sea levels in South Florida have risen by 4 to 6 inches, an extensively documented increase that accelerated since the early 1990s.” And based on data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, easily one of the most well-respected reports on climate change, by 2100, the world’s sea levels will have risen by two feet more than current levels.

The effects on Miami, where my university is based, will be devastating, a BusinessWeek story reports.

Scientists and government leaders say that they can only slow the effects, which include the silent rise of sea water that continues to push through porous limestone upon which Miami and South Florida are built.

The immediate problem, though, is that civic and economic leaders in South Florida aren’t talking about what’s ahead for us, besides the continued potential for luxury condo business and high-priced living. One might think sea level rise would be a good story for local press, but that doesn’t seem to be the case.
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The 10 greatest changes of the past 1,000 years

The 10 greatest changes of the past 1,000 years | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The last millennium has been shaped by successive waves of change, but which shifts have played the largest part in shaping the modern world? Historian Ian Mortimer identifies the ten leading factors which have driven change over the past 1,000 years
Sharrock's insight:

these changes can help with world building in fiction writing as well as in understanding history and the impacts of social technologies in history. It certainly put the Game of Thrones universe in perspective. Teachers might also use this short article to help introduce students to global history as well as to histories of a specific country. These treatments might help with writing for exams.

 

 

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Color and Texture: A Vertical View of Hong Kong [PHOTOS]

Color and Texture: A Vertical View of Hong Kong [PHOTOS] | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Travel photographer Peter Stewart wanted to explore a different angle of Hong Kong. So he created “Stacked – Hong Kong,” a collection of long-exposure architectural photos that capture the vertical view of the city’s high-rise apartments. Stewart takes the unvaried high-rises and their repetitive exteriors and turns them into beautiful, colorful patterns. Stewart told The […]

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A 17th-century argument for the many virtues of coffee, chocolate, and tea

A 17th-century argument for the many virtues of coffee, chocolate, and tea | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In this 1690 broadside advertisement, London merchant Samuel Price deployed rumor and vivid anecdote to advance the medical case for drinking coffee, chocolate, and tea.


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Behavioral Changes Seen after Sleep Learning

Behavioral Changes Seen after Sleep Learning | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Researchers exposed smokers to pairs of smells – cigarettes together with that of rotten eggs or fish – as the subjects slept, and then asked them to record how many cigarettes they smoked in the following week.
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Why Is Justin Wolfe Still in Prison?

Why Is Justin Wolfe Still in Prison? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A few years back, I wrote about prosecutorial misconduct in the Northern Virginia capital murder trial of Justin Wolfe.
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Great Opening Sentences From Science Fiction Novels

Great Opening Sentences From Science Fiction Novels | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
You can tell a lot about a science fiction book from its first sentence. A truly great first sentence establishes a tone, sticks in your mind, and serves as a little otherworldly koan, confounding your expectations.
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How to Make Family Names Plural

How to Make Family Names Plural | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Learn how to make names plural. Is it Kennedies or Kennedys? Does Bellman become Bellmen or Bellmans? Grammar Girl explains.
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Pacing in Transmedia Storytelling – Transmedia Storyteller

Pacing in Transmedia Storytelling – Transmedia Storyteller | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In an interactive, portmanteau-type transmedia story, the author tries to give the audience a good degree of freedom to explore and investigate at their own volition while still aiming to create a satisfying dramatic storyline.


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'People Can Be Afraid of Anything'

'People Can Be Afraid of Anything' | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The first time I saw the whale, I gasped. My field of vision filled with the sight of the monstrous blue thing diving from the museum ceiling. I felt like my skin was burning, like the floor was tilting up to meet me.
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The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn

The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
What happens when we teach a computer how to learn?
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Americanize, Anglicise: Why Do Brits And Yanks Spell Words Differently?

Americanize, Anglicise: Why Do Brits And Yanks Spell Words Differently? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
"The United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language." So goes the old chestnut commonly attributed to playwright George Bernard Shaw.
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The Big Personality Test - YouTube

The 5 personality traits that impact on our lives What is personality? How much of an impact does it have on our lives? Dr Jason Rentfrow will present result...
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Paris Review - The Art of Screenwriting No. 3, Terry Southern

Paris Review - The Art of Screenwriting No. 3, Terry Southern | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Paris Review is a literary magazine featuring original writing, art, and in-depth interviews with famous writers.
Sharrock's insight:
Southern: "Most screenwriters I’ve met are the people least suited to their work, because they have no ear, no notion of human relationships, no notion of psychology at all. They’re just scuffling in the dark, they’re searching. They think it’s a good racket to be in, like shingle salesmen or something—they’ve heard about the pay, and they fast-talk their way into a job by working in talent agencies, submitting scripts, getting personal relationships with producers, directors, actors. Finally somebody carries them in, some actor says, Let’s give Joe here a credit. And then they’re set, they’ve got a credit and are recognized as writers, but it’s like pulling teeth each time they put down a word. It’s a laborious, tedious process for them, because they can’t write. And they’ll work on anything, with absolutely no regard for material. All they ask is, How much money do I get? They never work for less than they worked for on the last one. If they do, they’re finished, it’s downhill all the way."
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Powerful and Surreal Self Portraits by 20-Year-Old Rachel Baran

Powerful and Surreal Self Portraits by 20-Year-Old Rachel Baran | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Rachel Baran is an extraordinarily talented U.S.-based photographer who creates amazing surreal and conceptual portraits that thousands of people have fallen in love with. And she's only 20 years old. One of the best things about Baran's work is that it's constantly evolving and growing. As ...

Via Tiaan Jonker, TBD
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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, February 2, 5:58 AM

One of the best things about Baran’s work is that it’s constantly evolving and growing. As such a young photographer, she’s still trying out different styles and inspirations. Some of her images are dark, introverted and full of suffering, while others encapsulate the young and artistic photographer’s youth and joy. What’s most important, however, is that all of them are creative and very well-done.

Click to watch more.

WasimE's curator insight, February 10, 11:51 AM

Wow, what an image!! 

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What It Takes to Design a Good Life

What It Takes to Design a Good Life | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
"Busy is a decision… You don't find the time to do things -- you make the time to do things." What does it take to have a good life? Th
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Unlocking Creativity in the Brain

Unlocking Creativity in the Brain | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Almost 20 years and five Academy Awards later, Catmull, now president of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios, is considered an authority on creativity.
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8 Epic Eating Contests In American History

8 Epic Eating Contests In American History | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In the Land of Plenty, Americans put the eat in compete.
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52 Of The World's Most Widespread Myths And Misconceptions, Debunked

52 Of The World's Most Widespread Myths And Misconceptions, Debunked | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A dropped penny won't kill you, alcohol doesn't keep you warm, and swallowed gum doesn't take seven years to digest. These are just three of more than fifty rumors debunked in this compendious collection of common myths and misconceptions.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Lynnette Van Dyke
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