Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

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"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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How to Do a Concept Analysis Paper for Nursing | The Classroom | Synonym

How to Do a Concept Analysis Paper for Nursing | The Classroom | Synonym | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Concept analysis in nursing most often uses the framework developed by Lorraine Olszewski Walker and Kay Coalson Avant and published in 2005 in their "Strategies for Theory Construction i
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excerpt: "Concept analysis in nursing most often uses the framework developed by Lorraine Olszewski Walker and Kay Coalson Avant and published in 2005 in their "Strategies for Theory Construction in Nursing" text. This framework has been criticized in recent years, even being called an arbitrary and vacuous exercise. Despite the criticisms, the framework is still widely used. Preparing a concept analysis paper for nursing involves conducting a literature review, identifying the key characteristics or attributes of the concept, identifying its antecedents and consequences and apply them to a model case." 
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Why I Hated Being a Cop

Why I Hated Being a Cop | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
For most cop-supporters I see, 90 percent of the time their response to dissenters is something along the lines of, “You haven’t served,” or “You don’t know what it’s like to walk a mile in a cop’s shoes.” Well, not only was I a cop, but I was crippled in the line of duty — with the boot they cut off me at the hospital to prove it. So I’m, like, double sacrosanct. It confuses them.
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Metaphors We Live By, Lakoff and Johnson

In Metaphors We Live By George Lakoff, a linguist, and Mark Johnson, a philosopher, suggest that metaphors not only make our thoughts more vivid and interesting but that they actually structure our perceptions and understanding. Thinking of marriage as a "contract agreement," for example, leads to one set of expectations, while thinking of it as "team play," "a negotiated settlement," "Russian roulette," "an indissoluble merger," or "a religious sacrament" will carry different sets of expectations. When a government thinks of its enemies as "turkeys or "clowns" it does not take them as serious threats, but if the are "pawns" in the hands of the communists, they are taken seriously indeed. Metaphors We Live By has led many readers to a new recognition of how profoundly metaphors not only shape our view of life in the present but set up the expectations that determine what life well be for us in the future. (from introduction in The Conscious Reader)
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The Dangerous, Harrowing Work of War Photographer Chris Hondros | Mother Jones

Shooting for Getty Images, Hondros covered the most perilous places on the planet. From the late 1990s onward, he risked his life so that we could casually glance at a photo in the New York Times, the LA Times, the Washington Post, or magazines such as The Economist, Newsweek, and Paris Match—and maybe even read the piece. Despite my own cynicism about over-coverage of violent conflicts, these types of photos are critically important in our understanding of what's going on in the world. And they are critical in getting people to pay attention. "Testament," pays homage to a man who died doing what he loved.
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The Largest Analysis of Film Dialogue by Gender, Ever

The Largest Analysis of Film Dialogue by Gender, Ever | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Lately, Hollywood has been taking so much shit for rampant sexism and racism. The prevailing theme: white men dominate movie roles.
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When Youth Violence Spurred ‘Superpredator’ Fear - NYTimes.com

When Youth Violence Spurred ‘Superpredator’ Fear - NYTimes.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Excerpt: "what happened with the superpredator jeremiads is that they proved to be nonsense. They were based on a notion that there would be hordes upon hordes of depraved teenagers resorting to unspeakable brutality, not tethered by conscience. "
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A neuroscientist explains why artificially intelligent robots will never have consciousness like humans

A neuroscientist explains why artificially intelligent robots will never have consciousness like humans | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
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I love when an expert steps out to say how something will never happen. Except, technically, neuroscientists are right. After all, motivation and intention comes from biological needs, homeostatic responses, sensory seeking and sensory defensiveness. The kinds of consciousness that emerges will be different from machines if they won't need food, appreciate flavors and sensations, or feel discomforts. I do believe that machines will develop consciousnesses as sensory inputs can become integrated.
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Why We Say "Sic 'em" to Get Dogs to Attack

Why We Say "Sic 'em" to Get Dogs to Attack | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Kiaan D. asks: Why do you say “sic him” to dogs when you want them to attack someone? People have been telling dogs to “sic ’em,” with the intent to have the dog attack individual(s), since at least the nineteenth century. The first known instance of someone instructing a dog to attack someone using this “sick” command occurred in Johnson J. Hooper’s 1845 Adventures of Capt. Simon Suggs
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The scientific explanation for why we get so mad at corporations

The scientific explanation for why we get so mad at corporations | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
It’s easy for people to get mad at corporations. We’re angry at pharmaceutical companies like Valeant for jacking up drug prices and at McDonald’s for paying its workers low wages.
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(Excerpt ) "our perceptions tend to categorize the minds of non-humans along two independent lines: one for thinking and one for feeling. For example, we perceive animals as feelers, and robots as thinkers. We also think of corporations as thinkers, capable of agency but not experiences. In our imaginations, “corporations are cyborgs,” as researchers at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management put it."
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Frontiers | Conspiracy theories as quasi-religious mentality: an integrated account from cognitive science, social representations theory, and frame theory | Personality and Social Psychology

Frontiers | Conspiracy theories as quasi-religious mentality: an integrated account from cognitive science, social representations theory, and frame theory | Personality and Social Psychology | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
It is difficult to explain the set of dimensions along which CTs vary from within specific disciplines. One dimension concerns the intensity of belief in the CT, which ranges from casual to passionate. More casual CTs (e.g., the “X-Files”), can be engaged with similar to any kind of fiction, suspending disbelief whilst being entertained (Sunstein and Vermeule, 2009). But other CTs are believed quite passionately, and are used to frame events in radical ways so as to mobilize collective action against a target (the conspiratorial agent). An example is the CT propagated during the Black Death accusing Jews of plotting against Christianity. This CT motivated Christian inhabitants of European cities to numerous pogroms, leading to the eradication of Jewish communities in Western Europe (Kelly, 2005). A second dimension of CTs is their distribution. Some CTs arise in a small community and are not widely accepted in society (e.g., the belief that powerful leaders of this planet are members of a race of lizards seeking world domination), while others are held by a majority of the population (e.g., the belief that the Kennedy assassination was not the work of a lone gunman; Goertzel, 1994). A third dimension along which CTs vary is their connection with collective action – some being confined to collective sense-making, whilst others (as in the pogroms) lead to collective action against the alleged conspirators.