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9_thinking_behaviours.pdf


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:01 PM

Great poster for students to assess their own thinking...

Marja Oilinki's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:01 AM

Pdf-muotoinen posteri yhdeksästä ajattelun laatua mittaavasta alueesta apukysymyksineen. Taidot: Selkeys, tedon oikeellisuus, tarkkuus, tiedon keskeisyys, käsittelyn syvyys, monipuolisuus, logiikka, reiluus ja merkityksellisyys.

History@FPGS's curator insight, March 13, 2014 9:46 AM

A great way to check your work.

Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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15 websites that use white space the right way

15 websites that use white space the right way | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Whenever anyone says white space, then we literally visualize white blank/empty spaces in our mind (white space can be of any color though). Well, that is true and is applicable even while designing. White space is actually the space that exists between elements to give a clean look to your web design. These days, many and many designers are understanding the importance of white space for creating clean, user friendly and elegant designs. The white spaces are being used in headers, footers, between images, between menus, text and sidebars....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 21, 10:16 AM
15 websites that use white space the right way. Creativity with your coffee.
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These 8 Scales Reveal Everything You Should Know About Different Cultures

These 8 Scales Reveal Everything You Should Know About Different Cultures | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Many people, perhaps especially Americans, underestimate how differently people do things in other countries. Examples and insights for avoiding this can be found in "The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business," a 2014 bestseller by INSEAD professor Erin Meyer (also check out those global communication diagrams from Richard Lewis). Meyer claims you can improve relationships by considering where you and international partners fall on each of these scales:


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I'm always interested about comparative indicators and measures. 

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16 Creepy Grande Dame Guignol Horror Films to Freak You Out

16 Creepy Grande Dame Guignol Horror Films to Freak You Out | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Popularly referred to as “hagsploitation” or “psycho-biddy” cinema, the genre of the Grande Dame Guignol was born, unintentionally, in 1962 by horror film director Robert Aldrich. After his sensational hit, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, starring screen legends Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, a string of “older women in peril” films rushed into production, with companies such as Hammer Films and Seven Arts seeking to reinstate, and capitalize on, mature actresses who’d been put out to pasture by Hollywood – for the unthinkable crime of aging.
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Sensory Studies

Sensory Studies | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Sensory Studies can also be divided along sensory lines into, for example, visual culture, auditory culture (or sound studies), smell culture, taste culture and the culture of touch, not to mention the sixth sense (however it might be defined)

 


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Mirella Cais's curator insight, January 8, 8:19 AM
Sensory Studies can also be divided along sensory lines into, for example, visual culture, auditory culture (or sound studies), smell culture, taste culture and the culture of touch, not to mention the sixth sense (however it might be defined)
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Evaluating the Quality of Research - IEEE - The Institute

Evaluating the Quality of Research - IEEE - The Institute | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
IEEE issues guidelines for assessing the impact of research articles

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Antonio Figueiredo's curator insight, June 23, 2014 6:20 PM

IEEE issues guidelines for assessing the impact of research articles.

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Dramatis personæ - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dramatis personæ

Dramatis personæ ( Latin: "persons of the drama") is a phrase used to refer collectively, in the form of a list, to the main characters in a dramatic work. Such lists are commonly employed in various forms of theater, and also on screen. Typically, off-stage characters are not considered part of the dramatis personæ.

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"The term is used to describe the multiple identifications one may adopt in an attempt to emphasize the expression of one's own individualism. An individuality is never obtained, as this process of establishing dramatis personæ creates a postmodern 'persona' which 'wears many hats', each different hat worn for a different group or surroundings. A logic of identity and individuality is replaced by a more 'superficial, tactile logic of identification where individuals become more mask-like personæ with mutable selves.' This self can no longer be theorized or based solely on an individual's job or productive function.[citation needed] The term was used by Karl Marx throughout his magnum opus Capital, where the capitalist and worker are introduced as dramatis personae in human history.[4]" (excerpt)

 
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Who Falls for Conspiracy Theories?

Who Falls for Conspiracy Theories? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Those on both the far right and far left tend to “adhere to their belief system in a rigid fashion, leading them to perceive their political ideas as the simple and only solution to societal problems,” writes a research team led by psychologist Jan-Willem van Prooijen of VU University Amsterdam.
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11 Morgue Workers Reveal The Delightfully Weird And Terrible Sh*t They've Seen On The Job

11 Morgue Workers Reveal The Delightfully Weird And Terrible Sh*t They've Seen On The Job | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Would you be comfortable working with the dead?
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50 Alternative and Unique Ways to Using WordPress - tomakeawebsite.net

50 Alternative and Unique Ways to Using WordPress - tomakeawebsite.net | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
WordPress is the most popular Content Management System (CMS), representing a whooping 69% of the market. Whether you want a basic blog, e-commerce website, or site for your Business, WordPress has you covered. So why is WordPress so popular? Well there are many reasons why people turn to WordPress for their website/blogging needs, here are …

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, January 3, 5:41 PM

I've used about a half-dozen of the suggestions in this interesting (if somewhat padded) list of ways to use WordPress.  I confess, I think of it primarily as a Blog platform. This article could stretch your thinking a bit on how blog platforms can do multiple duty.

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15+ Ways to Create New Content from Old Content | Kim Garst

15+ Ways to Create New Content from Old Content | Kim Garst | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

As a busy business owner, you likely don’t have time to create new content at the rate at which your audience demands it. Yet, with content marketing now being the #1 driver of search rankings, you can’t afford not to be constantly publishing new content.

 

Fortunately, there are ways you can take your existing content and feed it to the content marketing beast. With a little bit of elbow grease and some creativity, you can edit and re-use what you already have, and turn it into something your audience can’t get enough of!...


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John Norman's curator insight, January 7, 6:46 PM

Lots of good content recycling tips here. I have taken not of the details and intend to apply them. You should too. Well done Kim and good comments from Jeff Domansky

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, January 9, 10:22 AM

This is what most content creators will do, recycle old content to produce new content from an older content that has been tweaked and modified. As an an active blogger, I do the same with great effect. The implications for educationists lies in their ability to re-visit old posts after a lapse of some time whereby they can tweak and retouch observations according to what they have done in class. It always makes sense to re-visit old content and see how this content can be made more relevant to existing trends. While recycling might be achieved through re-posting of content as it is, a more pro-active approach would be to consider changing the title, adding more content and in addition, making necessary changes and corrections to make 'Old content' more in line with the latest in the industry. No doubt it might be difficult for content creators to continue producing good content throughout, so it makes sense to try recycling older content.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, January 18, 3:07 PM

Created or posted for marketing. But most of the tips are very helpful also for Lecturing/Teaching

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How to break 10 original news stories a week

How to break 10 original news stories a week | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This module, 'Issue-led journalism' explores how a simple editorial strategy can guarentee a steady stream of up to 10 original stories a week.

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Janet Vasil's curator insight, January 12, 12:21 PM

Think like a journalist to find your brand stories.

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Bad Santas who made the naughty list

Bad Santas who made the naughty list | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
From robbery to kidnapping to murder -- 6 true crime stories of Santas who definitely made the naughty list.
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When Pop Broke Up With Jazz

When Pop Broke Up With Jazz | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
For the first half of the 20th century, Tin Pan Alley songwriters like Irving Berlin and the Gershwins dominated pop music. By the the 1950s, tastes had changed, and the music changed with them.
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The highest YouTube earner of 2014 made nearly $5 million just by opening Disney toy packages

The highest YouTube earner of 2014 made nearly $5 million just by opening Disney toy packages | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, January 21, 1:13 PM


Rob Wile:  "An unidentified individual or group responsible for uploading videos that simply show a woman opening Disney toys made an estimated $4.9 million last year, more than any other channel for 2014, according to OpenSlate, a video analytics platform that analyzes ad-supported content on YouTube."

Fausto Cantu's curator insight, January 21, 9:06 PM

mi hija es fan

Greg Clemett's curator insight, January 22, 11:09 AM

Another new job/business... 'unboxing'

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Robots Can’t Dance - Issue 20: Creativity - Nautilus

Robots Can’t Dance - Issue 20: Creativity - Nautilus | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Can a robot be creative? Advances in cloud robotics—machines connected to supercomputers in the cloud—have given self-driving…

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Marci Segal, MS's curator insight, January 22, 12:04 PM

An interview with Ken Goldberg Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations at UC Berkeley about artificial intelligence and creativity.

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How do you tell someone they’re dying?

How do you tell someone they’re dying? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How do you tell someone they’re dying?

 

If the person in front of you doesn’t have long to live, what are the right words to tell them? Chrissie Giles asks doctors how they tackle the hardest conversation.
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Finding Meaning: 4 Reasons Why Qualitative Researchers Miss Meaning

Finding Meaning: 4 Reasons Why Qualitative Researchers Miss Meaning | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Research of any kind that is interested in the human subject is interested in finding meaning.  It is typically not enough to know that a behavior has occurred without knowing the significance of t...

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Kelly Krupa Rifelj's curator insight, March 18, 2014 10:16 AM

Anybody else use Scoop.it?

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6 Ideas for Displaying Qualitative Data

6 Ideas for Displaying Qualitative Data | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
I used to conduct qualitative-heavy research projects pretty much all day every day. Key informant interviews, bellwether interviews, document review, focus groups, you name it... ...so I know from...

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Antonio Figueiredo's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:27 AM

A Few Suggestions for Displaying Qualitative Results.

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10 Ways Our Minds Warp Time — PsyBlog

10 Ways Our Minds Warp Time — PsyBlog | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Our experience of time is flexible; it depends on attention, motivation, the emotions and more.
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The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century - YouTube

WHY IS SO MUCH WRITING SO BAD, and how can we make it better? Is the English language being corrupted by texting and social media? Do people write badly on purpose, to obfuscate and impress? Have dictionaries abandoned their responsibility to safeguard correct usage? Do kids today even care about good writing? In his latest book the Harvard linguist, cognitive scientist, bestselling author (The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, and The Better Angels of Our Nature) and chair of the Usage Panel of The American Heritage Dictionary, Dr. Steven Pinker, answers these questions and more. Pinker applies insights from the sciences of language and mind to the challenge of crafting clear, coherent, and stylish prose. Filled with examples of great and gruesome modern prose, The Sense of Style shows how the art of writing can be a form of pleasurable mastery and a fascinating intellectual topic in its own right, that is also informed by science. A book signing will follow the lecture.

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The Messy Minds of Creative People | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Messy Minds of Creative People | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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Creativity is very messy.

According to one prominent theory, the creative process involves four stages:  preparation, incubation, illumination, and verification. This is all well in good in theory. In reality, the creative process often feels like this:



Or this:



The creative process– from the first drop of paint on the canvas to the art exhibition– involves a mix of emotions, drives, skills, and behaviors. It’d be miraculous if these emotions, traits and behaviors didn’t often conflict with each other during the creative process, creating inner and outer tension. Indeed, creative people are often seen as weird, odd, and eccentric.

Over the years, scientists have attempted to capture the personality of creative people. But it hasn’t been easy putting them under the microscope. As psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who has interviewed creative people across various fields points out, creative people “show tendencies of thought and action that in most people are segregated. They contain contradictory extremes; instead of being an “individual,” each of them is a “multitude.”

So how can we possibly bring order to the messy minds of creators? A new paper offers some hope. Psychologists Guillaume Furst, Paolo Ghisletta and Todd Lubart present an integrative model of creativity and personality that is deeply grounded in past research on the personality of creative people.

Bringing together lots of different research threads over the years, they identified three “super-factors” of personality that predict creativity: Plasticity, Divergence, and Convergence.

The Super-Factors of Personality

Plasticity consists of the personality traits openness to experience, extraversion, high energy, and inspiration.* The common factor here is high drive for exploration, and those high in this super-factor of personality tend to have a lot of dopamine– “the neuromodulator of exploration“– coursing through their brains. Prior research has shown a strong link between Plasticity and creativity, especially in the arts.

Divergence consists of non-conformity, impulsivity, low agreeableness, and low conscientiousness. People high in divergence may seem like jerks, but they are often just very independent thinkers. This super-factor is close to Hans Eysenck’s concept of “Psychoticism“. Throughout his life, Eysenck argued that these non-conforming characteristics were important contributors to high creative achievements.



Finally, Convergence consists of high conscientiousness, precision, persistence, and critical sense. While not typically included in discussions of creativity, these characteristics are also important contributors to the creative process.

The researchers found that Convergence was strongly related to Plasticity. In other words, those who were open to new experiences, inspired, energetic, and exploratory tended to also have high levels of persistence and precision. The common factor here is most likely high energy. Perspiration and inspiration feed off each other, leading to even higher energy levels.

Nevertheless, these three super factors were at least partially distinct. For instance, those with high openness to experience and inspiration weren’t necessarily rebellious, impulsive, critical, or motivated to achieve.

Stages of Creativity

Critically, these three super-factors differed in importance depending on the stage of the creative process. While it’s true that the creative process is messy, scientists have at least put some order on things by agreeing on two broad classes of processes that work in cooperation to lead to high levels of creativity: Generation and Selection.

Generation consists of idea production and originality. During this stage, it’s crucial to silence the inner critic and imagine lots of different possibilities. This stage is all about quantity of ideas.

Generation is necessary but not sufficient for creativity, however. Selection helps make the ideas not only novel, but also valuable to society. The Selection stage involves processes such as criticism, evaluation, formalization, and elaboration of ideas. As Furst and colleagues note, “The ultimate goal of Selection is thus to form a coherent final product by providing a constant check during its development.”

Looking at the super-factors of personality, the researchers found that Plasticity and Divergence were most strongly related to the Generation stage of creativity. In contrast, Convergence was most strongly related to Selection. This makes sense, considering that creativity involves both processes relating to novelty and processes relating to usefulness. Indeed, the researchers found that the interaction of Generation and Selection was associated with both the intensity and achievement of everyday creative activities.**

But hold up, you may say. How can creativity be associated with all of these things: openness to experience, inspiration, high energy, impulsivity, rebelliousness, critical thinking, precision, and conscientiousness? Isn’t that contradictory?



Which brings us back to the beginning of this article. Creativity involves many different stages. Those who are capable of reaching the heights of human creative expression are those who have the capacity for all of these characteristics and behaviors within themselves and are flexibly able to switch back and forth between them depending on the stage of the creative process, and what’s most adaptive in the moment.

I told you creativity is messy.

Happy New Year! Thanks for supporting Beautiful Minds in 2014. Look out in 2015 for more insights on intelligence and creativity as well as a new book on the latest science of creativity, co-authored with Carolyn Gregoire.


© 2014 Scott Barry Kaufman, All Rights Reserved


* It should be noted that the researchers measured “extraversion”using the Big Five framework. Under this framework, extraversion consists of a collection of traits associated with high sensitivity to environmental rewards, including positive emotions, sociability, enthusiasm, novelty seeking, assertiveness, and self-confidence. This finding does not mean that introverts are less likely to be creative. In fact, research suggests that the sociability component of extraversion is not as strongly linked to creativity as the other components of extraversion. If anything, research shows that the capacity for solitude is essential for optimal creativity. The facets of extraversion that seem to be most crucial to creativity are those associated with high energy, novelty seeking, positive emotions, and assertiveness.

**Interestingly, selection alone was not related to creativity. In particular, they found that people who were really good at Selection showed reduced levels of creativity if their Generation skills were low. Therefore, Generation skills are essential to creativity, and while generation skills may compensate for lower levels of Selection ability, the highest levels of Selection in the world may not be able to help you create if you have very low Generation ability.

Acknowledgements: Thanks to Andrea Kuszewski and Carolyn Gregoire for bringing those alternative conceptualizations of the creative process to my attention.

About the Author: Scott Barry Kaufman is Scientific Director of The Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Follow on Twitter @sbkaufman.
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Lorrie Moore on the Difficulties of Constructing a Writing Life

Lorrie Moore on the Difficulties of Constructing a Writing Life | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
From the time I first started writing, the trick for me has always been to construct a life in which writing could occur. I have never been blocked, never lost faith (or never lost it for longer th...

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What is talent – and can science spot what we will be best at?

What is talent – and can science spot what we will be best at? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
While deliberate practice is a large part of the story of success, it is unlikely to be the entire story. After all, what contributes to the motivation to practise in the first place? Why do some people seem to learn particular material faster than others? How come even when we take two people with the same amount of deliberate practice, there are still differences in their performance? In a recent study, David Z Hambrick and colleagues found that deliberate practice only explained 30% of the differences in performance ratings in chess and music, leaving most of the variation unexplained by other factors.
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Physician suicide: Facts and solutions to the hidden epidemic

Physician suicide: Facts and solutions to the hidden epidemic | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Each year we lose over 400 to physician suicide: That’s like an entire medical school gone. What can we do? Here are some solutions.
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excerpt: "Vincent told stories of how surgeons publicly humiliated interns. How he and his partner fell asleep leaning against walls in the hospital while waiting for their patient’s turn for a scan. He spoke of his doubts about saving this one guy who jumped out of a building when caught raping a young girl who was also being treated in an adjacent room. He spoke of the sisters — victims of a car accident — brought to the ER, stunned him for a moment because they looked like his mom and aunt who often travel together without seat belts. Vincent took a belt and hung himself in his closet. The note he left:"

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A missing jet and the truth about Indonesia’s troubled aviation history

A missing jet and the truth about Indonesia’s troubled aviation history | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How Indonesia's airline industry got to be one of the world's most dangerous. Indonesia’s aviation industry remains one of the world’s most hazardous. Numerous accidents and incidents marred the industry’s rapid ascent, and the European Union banned all but five of its 67 airlines from European airspace. The U.S. State Department likewise expressed concern over Indonesia’s aviation practices, and even Indonesia’s civil aviation chief in 2007 called it a “never-ending struggle” to improve the country’s culture and safety practices. The Federal Aviation Administration ranks it as a “category 2″ country for deficient aviation safety, a rating shared by such nations as Ghana and Bangladesh.
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