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After nearly 15 years, Education Dept. revives fines against two institutions - Inside Higher Ed

After nearly 15 years, Education Dept. revives fines against two institutions - Inside Higher Ed | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
After nearly 15 years, Education Dept. revives fines against two institutions Inside Higher Ed Earlier this year, the Education Department suddenly told officials at two universities they needed to pay up for minor infractions of federal student...
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors

Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Shares the single most effective trick EVER for creating a realistic, compelling, and powerful bad guy.
Sharrock's insight:

I read some of the same exploration in John Gardner's On Moral Fiction. Actions of a major character, no matter how seemingly extreme or destructive, needs to be explained in terms of character, motivations, incidents and responses to those incidents. This is one of the most powerful indicators towards post-modernism, the idea that there are no black and white bad guys. The Game of Thrones books does this to a great degree (so much so that "goodness" does not insure one's survival nor that "sadism"--evil--insure a violent, ironic death). History, and the stories told about motivations and actions, support those motivations and actions, just as well as BIG-C creativity can only be supported in retrospect. Sometimes, the expression "let history be my judge" can be a bit melodramatic, but something similar might need to be said.

 

 Andrea Kuszewski explored this issue using science findings http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/03/31/walking-the-line-between-good-and-evil-the-common-thread-of-heroes-and-villains/  to support another way writers might develop evil characters.

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The 25 Countries With The Most Brainpower

The 25 Countries With The Most Brainpower | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Having brilliant people is essential to the future of any country. Along with a Duke IQ researcher, we've put together a ranking of the ones with the most.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Note that we're not including China on this list. Not every student in China was assessed, but only a few cities. And the result was that Shanghai in particular was a large outlier. Shanghai represents a tiny fraction of China's population, is a migration hub that attracts elites, and is much wealthier than the country as a whole. 84% of Shanghai's high school students go to college, while 24% do nationwide. Parents in Shanghai also spend a great deal of money on external tutoring, which an average worker couldn't afford."


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What Inspires Creativity? - 8 Methods to Summon Your Muse - Jan Moran

What Inspires Creativity? - 8 Methods to Summon Your Muse - Jan Moran | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
I love to chat with readers, writers, and entrepreneurs, and am often asked where authors get their creative ideas. Aside from the usual place (in the bathtub surrounded by bubbles), I began to think: What inspires creativity?
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The Art of Fearless Storytelling: 10 Tips to Become a Better Writer.

The Art of Fearless Storytelling: 10 Tips to Become a Better Writer. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
By Stephanie Spence (RT @saradjcanning: 10 simple reminders. Homework. http://t.co/Rrqykga7LA)
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Research Tools Every Writer Needs - Aerogramme Writers' Studio

Research Tools Every Writer Needs - Aerogramme Writers' Studio | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Historical fiction author Kelly Gardiner shares some of the wonderful free resources that writers can use to make the most out of their research time.
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HowStuffWorks "Who invented salted caramel?"

HowStuffWorks "Who invented salted caramel?" | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There's no such thing as a salted caramel tree, so where did the delicious concoction come from and why is it so yummy?
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Analysing characterisation in operatic arias

Analysing characterisation in operatic arias | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A guide to analysing operatic arias with the emphasis on techniques of musical characterisation. 1. a blank template 2. an example of the template filled in. The blank template.     &nbsp...
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6 Good Educational Web Tools to Teach Writing Through Comics

6 Good Educational Web Tools to Teach Writing Through Comics | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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5 Fantastic Writing Tools - including a thesaurus in Google Drive

Steve looks at some terrific writing tools. A Thesaurus in Google Drive A word counter that can be used for both better writing and better SEO. http://www.wo...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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systerwoody's curator insight, February 20, 9:31 AM

#NTS Note to self

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How Writing Things Down Can Change Your Life

How Writing Things Down Can Change Your Life | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

What do you write down? For most of us, writing consists of emails, task lists, and perhaps the odd work project. However, making time to write down certain things, such as our daily experiences, our goals, and our mental clutter can change the way we live our lives.

 

Here are six different ways that writing things down can change your life, and what you can do to get the most out of each.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 28, 2013 2:25 PM

Writing things down can foster a sense of achievement and progress, expanding our possibilities and increasing our productivity.

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Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques

Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

We weren’t all born to love verbs and spend hours toiling lovingly over word order and yet as small business owners and marketers, one of the most important hats that we necessarily wear is “writer”.

 

If you don’t consider yourself a writer, aren’t entirely comfortable with the writing process and can’t outsource to a professional, that doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water. Nor does it mean you should shrug and put out subpar content because, “Hey, I’m not a writer. That’s as good as it gets.”

 

Try one or more of these techniques the next time you put pencil to paper – or fingers to keyboard – for writing that has a whole lot more marketing punch....


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Matt Rees's curator insight, February 18, 10:15 PM

"Meh" does seem to be the new word on the web. It's not exactly good writing, but let's not hold that against them....

Jenny McComb's curator insight, March 5, 6:37 AM

Good article! Lots of useful hints to help add spark and clarity to one's writing. I found the tips on he/she/it/them especially insightful. A good example of personable writing on a specific topic as well.

Valerie Robins's curator insight, June 11, 10:14 AM

If you don’t consider yourself a writer, aren’t entirely comfortable with the writing process and can’t outsource to a professional, that doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water. Nor does it mean you should shrug and put out subpar content because, “Hey, I’m not a writer. That’s as good as it gets.”


Try one or more of these techniques the next time you put pencil to paper – or fingers to keyboard – for writing that has a whole lot more marketing punch....

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7 steps of good report writing, part 2

7 steps of good report writing, part 2 | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Continued from here. As we have just covered physical evidence and how it pertains to a disciplinary court line and even possible court cases, it’s just as important to consider

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 3, 7:52 AM

As we have just covered physical evidence and how it pertains to a disciplinary court line and even possible court cases, it’s just as important to consider the written report. The written report is going to include written documentation about observed behaviors, statements, and even deductions concerning an incident. In this column, we will explore the critical elements of the written report. For anyone who has taken a basic report writing class, this is going to look very familiar. We will expand on each of individual areas of report writing to ensure that what you write your report right.

What are the areas of the report that we will be concentrating on? They are: who, what, when, where, why, how, and action taken.

Where?
The “where” of the incident is critical, too. Your report is much more professional when you put the exact location of the incident. For example, if the fight occurred in the dining hall, section two, about in the center, then put that. The “where” is very important in cases where physical evidence is collected. If you find a homemade knife in an inmate’s cell, you need to explain exactly where that knife was.

Which of the following statements gives a more accurate description of where the contraband was found:

“I found this in cell B123,”

or,

“the contraband was discovered in the spine of a Bible, which was marked as property of Inmate Jones #12345. This was discovered in Inmate Jones assigned living quarters of B123 in the upper right cabinet, which was secured with a padlock.”

The second statement not only gives the reader a more accurate description of where the item was found, but also places the item to the specific inmate; it was in property marked as his, in his secured locker. There is very little chance that an inmate can use the common, “someone put it there to set me up,” defense.

Why?
The next area of report writing is the “why.” As a hearing officer, I did not spend too much time on this because it often leads the reader away from facts and establishes opinions. For example, from a disciplinary standpoint I didn’t really care why an inmate made a comment that was disrespectful to an officer. I didn’t really care why an inmate battered another inmate. The only thing that I cared about was whether or not the incident happened, and whether or not it is considered a rule violation.

This may seem very “Robocop” of me, but often times when getting in to the “why,” we lead our focus away from the core issue and the facts. You may even start to justify negative behaviors of the inmate and move away from holding them responsible. For example, you observe a battery. Inmate Jones walks up to inmate Smith and starts battering Inmate Smith with a lock tied to a belt. You see this, break up the incident and secure the weapon. As you are waiting for another staff member to escort Inmate Jones to segregation, Inmate Jones tells you that he did it because Inmate Smith had been threatening him.

This information needs to go to your investigations department, but does not need to go in the report. This statement may or may not be true. If you want to put this in the report as a direct quote from Inmate Jones, then you may do so as it is a part of the incident. However, if you word it outside of a quote, such as, “Inmate Jones battered Inmate Smith because Inmate Smith had threatened him,” your weight as a credible officer gives credence to Inmate Jones accusation that Inmate Smith was threatening Inmate Jones.

That statement has yet to be established as a fact, but your statement alone has “made” it a fact. Avoid the “why” of the incident because it gives credence to statements that may or may not be factual. It also inserts opinion in to your report, and we want to stick to the facts.

How?
I like to describe the “how” of an incident as how the behavior or discovery matches the charge that you are writing the inmate for.

If you find a knife in an inmate’s pants pocket, how is this dangerous contraband? That one is pretty simple.

However, if an inmate makes a statement that you have considered threatening, how was it a threat?

The standard that I used during a disciplinary hearing was the “reasonable person” standard. Would any reasonable person consider the statement to be threatening, for example. If an inmate comes up to you and says, “punk, you better leave me alone,” is this this a threat or simply disrespect? I am inclined to believe that there would be an action taken by the inmate if I didn’t, “leave him alone,” and that action would probably not be a recommendation for employee of the month. So, would any reasonable person believe that this was a threat? I am inclined to rule that it was. It was disrespectful at minimum.

However, a good report writer will include not only the statement, but any behaviors to corroborate the charge. If the inmate made that statement while approaching you with his fists clenched and was clearly angry, this would solidify the charge.

Action taken
Finally, the “action taken” part of the report is what action was taken as a result of the discovery, inmate behavior, or incident. This is commonly written in cases of evidence recovery as, “the (evidence) was confiscated and secured in Temporary Evidence Locker #9,” or, “the inmate was directed to return to his cell and did (or did not) comply.” This is the action that you took to resolve the situation. What did you do? What was the inmate’s response to your directives and/ or actions? Did the facility respond, such as a transferring the inmate to an administrative segregation unit? Were the inmate’s actions isolated or did they have an effect on the tier, housing unit, or compound? If so, how?

It would be important to mention in this part of the report if restitution is being requested. For example, if an inmate intentionally breaks a window, you may want to try to have him pay for it. This is simply put like this: “On behalf of the State of (your state), I am seeking restitution in the amount of $120 to cover the cost of the window and labor to replace it.” If you have gone this far to find out how much it cost to replace the item, you should reference who gave you that information, in this example it would be the facility maintenance personnel. Including this documentation further strengthens your report.

In conclusion, make sure that you are clear and honest in your report. Stick to the who, what, when, where, how, and action taken to avoid putting unnecessary points and opinions in your report. And remember, the more accurate your report is now, the easier the incident will be to remember when it comes time to stand by your report.

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the secret origins of wonder woman

Comic books were more or less invented in 1933 by Maxwell Charles Gaines, a former elementary school principal who went on to found All-American Comics. Superman first bounded over tall buildings in 1938. Batman began lurking in the shadows in 1939. Kids read them by the piles. Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/origin-story-wonder-woman-180952710/#d5kSBZd1O2C4BLDO.99 Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter
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How To Conquer Your Massive Creative Project The Ken Burns Way

How To Conquer Your Massive Creative Project The Ken Burns Way | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns discusses how to get through a long-term creative undertaking like, say, a 14-hour doc on the history of the...
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The Real Link Between Creativity and Mental Illness | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Real Link Between Creativity and Mental Illness | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Genius, Suicide and Mental Illness: Insights into a Deep Connection (The Real Link Between Creativity and Mental Illness | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network
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7 Times Batman has bent his 'no guns' rule

7 Times Batman has bent his 'no guns' rule | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
For a hero almost entirely defined by his aversion to firearms, Batman seems to bend his rule a lot: even the latest Batmobile has some huge cannons on the front.
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UK’s Oral Storytelling Renaissance Spans Clubs, Books : Publishing Perspectives

UK’s Oral Storytelling Renaissance Spans Clubs, Books : Publishing Perspectives | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Curators of oral storytelling series in the UK discuss how the form is a reaction to our increasingly digital world — and how it intersects with publishing. (Contadores de histórias - para adultos - ressurgem no Reino Unido.
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The Principles of Character Motivation | WritersDigest.com

The Principles of Character Motivation | WritersDigest.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Explore the principles of human nature, including resentment and revenge, and how it can lead to character development and motivation.
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Dense Words: It's only dancing; how to describe music, poetry and fighting

Dense Words: It's only dancing; how to describe music, poetry and fighting | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
how to write a fight scene in fiction
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Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants

Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant - not being a servant to the words. It's a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they're about half way through the first boo...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, August 31, 5:29 PM
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant – not being a servant to the words. It’s a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they’re about half way through the first book and are finding the words mastering them, not the other way around.

I re-pitched my history of New Zealand for its second edition, altering the tone to bring the writing up to date.

It has to be addressed. And there is, alas, only one way to do that. That’s right – practise. But that shouldn’t be a chore – writing’s fun, right?

Once you’ve made words your servant – and your friend – you can start paying attention to the equally crucial matters of content, tone and style – together, what we might call ‘voice’. This isn’t something that just happens; it can be directed and controlled, just like any other aspect of writing. Take George McDonald Fraser’s Flashman, a novel about the bully from Tom Brown’s Schooldays, grown up and turned Victorian-age military hero. Fraser presented it as a ‘found memoir’ – which it wasn’t – but buoyed the conceit with such a subtle ‘1840’ period tone to his words that at least one reviewer was taken in.

It works in non-fiction, too. Recently I re-wrote one of my earlier books, a kids’ book pitched for 8 year olds, into a young adult-and-older account pitched for the 12+ bracket. It had to be completely re-written to do so – with full attention to the language, content and tone. I also re-pitched my history of New Zealand, when it came around to the second edition, to modernise the writing.

The trick to achieving that  control – something superficially easy to do but very hard to actually master. It takes a long time for writers to be able to consciously control the tone. But it’s an essential writing skill, and one that improves with practise. My tips? Try this:

1. Pick a passage by (say) your favourite author. What defines the tone? Look through a passage for key words – terms that give flavour. Check the pacing, the ‘beats’. Look for sentence length and paragraphing. Is it present or past tense? Examine the material closely and make notes.

2. Now try writing a passage at least 750 words long, of your own, in the same style, with the same cadence, word selection and rhythms.

3. Didn’t work? Of course not, it won’t the first time. But this is an exercise…and you know what exercises mean. Yup – do it again.

4. And again.

5. And again (etc).

It’s the only way. Did I mention you then throw the exercises away? Words are not precious babies, still less numeric targets. They’re tools, and they’re disposable. You can always write more.

The point is that when you’ve mastered tone, you’re more than half way to controllingvoice, content and style. Writing will be your servant. Not the other way around. And there’s one other benefit that comes out of doing all this. With the quality comes that most precious of all skills that writers can have – speed.

Do you deliberately throw away ‘practise writing’? How do you extend yourself when writing?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Why Stephen King Spends 'Months and Even Years' Writing Opening Sentences

Why Stephen King Spends 'Months and Even Years' Writing Opening Sentences | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The author of horror classics like The Shining and its 2013 sequel Doctor Sleep says the best writers hook their readers with voice, not just action....

 

Stephen King: There are all sorts of theories and ideas about what constitutes a good opening line. It's tricky thing, and tough to talk about because I don't think conceptually while I work on a first draft -- I just write. To get scientific about it is a little like trying to catch moonbeams in a jar.

 

But there's one thing I'm sure about. An opening line should invite the reader to begin the story. It should say: Listen. Come in here. You want to know about this.

 

How can a writer extend an appealing invitation -- one that's difficult, even, to refuse?We've all heard the advice writing teachers give: Open a book in the middle of a dramatic or compelling situation, because right away you engage the reader's interest. This is what we call a "hook," and it's true, to a point. This sentence from James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice certainly plunges you into a specific time and place, just as something is happening:

 

"They threw me off the hay truck about noon."...


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 24, 2013 10:58 AM

Advice from the master of horror for storytellers, bloggers and writers. This entire By Heart is a series in The Atlantic in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. It is recommended reading.

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A Rabble-Rouser’s Rules for Writing Kick-Ass Closing Paragraphs - Copyblogger

A Rabble-Rouser’s Rules for Writing Kick-Ass Closing Paragraphs - Copyblogger | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

You don’t want your post to fizzle out with a few drab sentences. But how can you come up with something truly inspirational?

 

... Your job as a blogger is not simply to write tutorials.

 

Your job is not to share tips and facts and advice.

 

A useful tip that’s not implemented is like a riveting book that’s never opened. It’s forgotten and useless.You’re not simply a blogger. You’re a mentor for your readers, a chief of your village, a leader of your tribe.

 

Come on. Fire up your tribe. Jump-start their actions.

 

Your readers are waiting for you.


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 27, 11:19 PM

Do it right. Or risk losing your readers.

wanderingsalsero's curator insight, February 28, 1:15 AM

a short article but still some good points.

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Transmedia Writing

Transmedia Writing | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Geoff Livingston:  "Stories told across multi-platform media environments — or transmedia stories as they are commonly called on the edge — require more complex writing. A story unfolds across diverse media with readers/viewers opting in to each layer."


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Online Writing with Clarity Infographic - Business 2 Community

Online Writing with Clarity Infographic - Business 2 Community | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Online writing may include blogging, marketing copy, website or newsletter content and they all share the need for clarity.  One of the first things we learn about writing online is we have seconds to capture a reader and their attention span is short. Clear, concise writing wasn’t invented online, however, it has always been taught to writers as a best practice.  Long before the Internet, George Orwell said, “If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out."....


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aanve's curator insight, February 13, 10:23 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mana Huart's curator insight, February 14, 2:12 AM

C'est si simple…

Mick D Kirkov's curator insight, March 15, 8:40 AM

Penelope

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Female Physicists Worldwide Fight Sexist Stereotypes

Female Physicists Worldwide Fight Sexist Stereotypes | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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