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Google rolls out new 'Hummingbird' search algorithm

Google is trying to keep pace with the evolution of Internet usage. As search queries get more complicated, traditional "Boolean" or keyword-based systems begin deteriorating because of the need to match concepts and meanings in addition to words.

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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


Via Amira
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How to Be Grateful Even During Tough Times - Good News Network

How to Be Grateful Even During Tough Times - Good News Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
When you acknowledge the people and things in your day that were helpful or appreciated, it can put things back in perspective again and bring you back to center or a more mindful space.
Sharrock's insight:

There are ways to direct your attention in order to regulate your moods and attitudes. It's not easy to "stop being negative". Instead of stopping thoughts--which is extremely difficult--be conscious of the good times and "mark" them for your memories. This article describes some ways to "bank" those good memories so that you can use them against the bad days. You can focus on those positives rather than expend effort forcing the "bad thoughts" away.

 

Reminds me of The Giver by Lois Lowry.

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Never trust a corporation to do a library’s job — The Message

Never trust a corporation to do a library's job - The Message - Medium
As Google abandons its past, Internet archivists step in to save our collective memory.
Sharrock's insight:
The Internet Archive is mostly known for archiving the web, a task the San Francisco-based nonprofit has tirelessly done since 1996, two years before Google was founded. The Wayback Machine now indexes over 435 billion webpages going back nearly 20 years, the largest archive of the web
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Meta-Analysis 101: What You Want to Know in the Era of Comparative Effectiveness

Meta-Analysis 101: What You Want to Know in the Era of Comparative Effectiveness | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Meta-analysis can be a powerful technique for summarizing evidence. Each meta-analysis is, in and of itself, a scientific investigation, and its quality is dependent on the methods used in carrying out the "experiment."2 Different researchers may use different techniques, include different studies, and draw different conclusions. Like any experiment, meta-analyses are subject to bias and error, both of which may affect the validity of the conclusions and their utility for decision makers. As a result, not all meta-analyses are of equal quality. Thus "consumers" of meta-analyses—especially decision makers—must carefully assess the quality of each meta-analysis by considering the research questions asked, the methods used, the analysis and interpretation of the data, the investigation of heterogeneity, and the conclusions drawn.
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Virtue signaling and other inane platitudes - The Boston Globe

Virtue signaling and other inane platitudes - The Boston Globe | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Though virtue signaling has a form that is quite common in insults used by the right to mock the left, it is a bit different. Geoffrey Nunberg — a linguist who teaches at the University of California Berkeley School of Information and is author of “Talking Right: How Conservatives Turned Liberalism into a Tax-Raising, Latte-Drinking, Sushi-Eating, Volvo-Driving, New York Times-Reading, Body-Piercing, Hollywood-Loving, Left-Wing Freak Show” — said via e-mail that this term is a departure from previous insults: “Like ‘latte-sipping,’ ‘Volvo-driving’ and the rest, ‘virtue signaling’ belongs chiefly to the right. But it’s not really comparable. For one thing, it’s a gerund, not a participle — that is, it functions as a noun and not an adjective. Second, it’s a clunky mouthful — it doesn’t trip off the tongue, it stumbles. And it’s abstract. It doesn’t bring a vivid image to mind — a car, a drink, a dish, a sport — but only describes the vague object of a certain kind of behavior, which the right believes is exclusive to the left.”
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Every Noise at Once

All the world's music genres in one map (with an example to listen to for each genre!): http://everynoise.com/engenremap.html ;

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Late Bloomers

Late Bloomers | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Doing something truly creative, we’re inclined to think, requires the exuberance and energy of youth. Malcolm Gladwell questions whether this popular assumption is true.
Sharrock's insight:
Picasso’s greatest works came early but Cézanne’s came late. Why do we equate genius with precocity? "...then there was Alfred Hitchcock, who made “Dial M for Murder,” “Rear Window,” “To Catch a Thief,” “The Trouble with Harry,” “Vertigo,” “North by Northwest,” and “Psycho”—one of the greatest runs by a director in history—between his fifty-fourth and sixty-first birthdays. Mark Twain published “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” at forty-nine. Daniel Defoe wrote “Robinson Crusoe” at fifty-eight." (Excerpt)
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What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, January 2, 8:26 AM

As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.

 

 

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What Exactly Does An Editor Do? The Role Has Changed Over Time

What Exactly Does An Editor Do? The Role Has Changed Over Time | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Earlier this year it became clear that Harper Lee had extensively revised To Kill a Mockingbird on the advice of her editor. That made us wonder: How much do editors shape the books we read?

Via Sharon Bakar
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Struggles and Joys of Women Leading Creative Lives

Struggles and Joys of Women Leading Creative Lives | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Artists are creative people regardless of their gender, of course, but women may face particular challenges, especially as mothers.

Via Douglas Eby
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30 Must have Tools for Web Developers - Infographics

30 Must have Tools for Web Developers - Infographics | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In early days of the Internet, web developers didn’t have or needed much in terms of software or technology. Today, however, websites are far more complex. Even the most seasoned veteran must have a much deeper assortment of Web development technologies to get the job done.

 

While there is no definitive list, we have collected some of our favourite solutions for many tasks that web developers face while building websites and applications. From coding to deployment, file sharing to transfer, here is our list....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, December 20, 2015 12:13 PM

Here is a list of 30 must have tools for web developers.

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Foundations of Meaning in Human Life

This essay has reviewed, clarified, and extended the list of universal human needs that Maslow first proposed. The next step would be to find first valid, then reliable ways of testing the hypothesis that each of these needs is indeed universal and invariant in different cultures and historical eras.

If such tests supported, even partially, the universality of these needs, the next step would be to investigate the extent to which societies allow their fulfillment If my definitions of solidarity, esteem, creativity, and emotional experience are valid, it would seem that most of these needs are not fulfilled for most people, even the most affluent.

It appears, for example, that connectedness and a sense of belonging are problematic in Western societies. That is, by my definitions, both collective and interpersonal solidarity are rare. The requirement of balance in identifying with, and awareness of self and other, us and them, suggests that most bonds are alienated in either the isolated or engulfed form. At the level both of families and large groups, what I have called bimodal alienation (engulfment within the group, isolation from other groups) seems to be the norm, rather than the exception. Since the degree and type of relationships may be crucial for not only for individuals but also for groups, these issues call out for considerably more discussion and research.
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How To Be Creative: 6 Secrets Backed By Research

How To Be Creative: 6 Secrets Backed By Research | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Here’s what we can learn from Scott about how to be creative:
Be open to new experiences: It’s the most important thing to do. Just try new stuff. (What are you ordering for lunch today? Really? Don’t get that. You always get that.)
Go for a walk: It can make you more creative and it’s exercise. Two birds, one stone, baby.
Take a shower: If you’re not doing this one, I don’t want to hang out with you. Period.
Take some “me” time: No, not me, you. So “you” time.
Take “The Outsider’s Mindset”: Think like a kid. Stop taking your everyday work for granted. What about it would be odd to an outsider? There’s gold in thinking about that.
Keep trying: Most of what the great geniuses produced was utter crap. Same is true for you. But nobody needs to know about your misses. Keep trying and just count the hits.
So what happens when you spend more time being creative? When you spend more time daydreaming, taking photographs, talking passionately about personal goals or keeping a journal? You live a better life.
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Keystone Habits to Create a Highly-Collaborative Environment

Keystone Habits to Create a Highly-Collaborative Environment | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
he referenced the work of Charles Duhigg in the book The Power of Habit. Duhigg writes about “keystone habits” – essentially some habits matter more than others – keystone habits have the power to start a chain reaction, changing other habits as they move through an organization or system. They start a process that can start to shift, dislodge, and remake other patterns.

My strategic question became: What is a keystone habit or behavior that we could each adopt that will create a culture of collaborative learning and working in networked ways? (This could be a fruitful small group brainstorm for a collaborative network to do.)
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

Here are some of other suggestions for keystone habits I have received to this in recent interviews:

"Taking notes from conversations and group work and sharing them so everyone can see and learn from the group’s work." – Eugene Kim“Smiling – think about when you are frowning and how this negativity clamps down and puts a lid on everything, it closes communication. When people smile, they are more open, this sends a signal and exhibits to others that you are extending a hand, extending a welcome and openness to ideas.” – Ina Anderson, MA Smart Growth Alliance“Model the “we” by changing external communications. In the Northern Forest Alliance, every organization had its own magazine, where they would typically promote what they did. Through work with the Alliance, all of the members changed the tone of their publications to focus on what we did together, what was accomplished by working together with many partners. This was a useful lever to get people to shift their world view.” – Andi Colnes, Energy Action Network Vermont"Using the practice of "yes and" to respond to others ideas, essentially building on them versus saying "no" or "but". - Ruth Rominger, Garfield Foundation

What are your suggestions for a keystone habit? 

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One Weird Trick That Makes a Novel Addictive

One Weird Trick That Makes a Novel Addictive | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Adaptation is a kaleidoscopic way of understanding human nature, and a novelistic technique for showing that character isn’t fixed. In real life, people change constantly, depending on who’s in the room, or what they’ve each understood of the others’ nature and mood. Character isn’t only a ball rolling down a hill, these women write it like a game of billiards, with endless potential shifts and ricochets. These female characters aren’t just judging which man’s mind will give them the best hope for a respectful marriage; they are describing and creating a frame for the ways people create themselves in relation to others.

This is the way adaptation plays out: Person A comprehends some information about person B’s nature from what B says or does, and that changes how A approaches her afterward. It sounds simple, but I think it’s very difficult to write and nearly impossible to write well. Almost no one tries. Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte each did this over and over.
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