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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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The Weird, Scary and Ingenious Brain of Maria Bamford - NYTimes.com

The Weird, Scary and Ingenious Brain of Maria Bamford - NYTimes.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
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5 Techniques To Develop Your Short Story Into A Novel - Writer's Relief, Inc.

5 Techniques To Develop Your Short Story Into A Novel - Writer's Relief, Inc. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Want to turn your short story into a novel? Here are five ways to do it! But beware, not all short stories are meant to be novels.
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Comedians’ Smarts, Humor, and Creativity

Comedians’ Smarts, Humor, and Creativity | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How intelligent are stand-up comedians?

 

Overall, the results of this study suggest that professional stand-up comedians are a distinct vocational group: they score higher on all humor styles, on humor ability, and on verbal intelligence than college students, but they also show different patterns of correlations between Big Five personality traits and humor styles, and a discrepancy between on-stage persona and private personality. Comedians’ professional success depends not just on their short-term spontaneous humor production ability, but also on their long-term skill, dedication, and ambition in crafting and refining an effective act that can be modulated for different audiences in different cities with different tastes, traits, backgrounds, and levels of inebriation. It also depends upon their fluent, strategic use of affiliative humor and self-deprecating humor when interacting with club managers, booking agents, and other comedians.

 
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Ambivalent Men and the Women Who Love Them

Ambivalent Men and the Women Who Love Them | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The non-committal, emotionally unavailable man pairing with an overly attentive female who is willing to hang in there--no matter what--is a surprisingly common relationship. Always eager to sew wild oats, the male in this dynamic is frequently described as a "player.”

Why in this scenario does the female stay true to such a man? It may be because she believes his very aloofness makes him a more desirable catch. If she hangs in there long enough, he will eventually commit, and it will mean so much more because he was so ambivalent about her in the beginning. She sees a chance for self-validation in earning his attention when others couldn't.

Women caught in this circular thinking rarely experience a happy romantic ending. 

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Glimpses of the long-gone, cool, decaying seediness of 42nd Street

Glimpses of the long-gone, cool, decaying seediness of 42nd Street | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Before it was swept clean and purified with Disney goodness, you could enjoy New York’s 42nd street in all its noisy, colorful, rude, and vivid glory. Mitch O’Connell shares his treasure trove of late 20th century photos.
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How Pixar Fosters Collective Creativity

How Pixar Fosters Collective Creativity | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A movie contains literally tens of thousands of ideas. They’re in the form of every sentence; in the performance of each line; in the design of characters, sets, and backgrounds; in the locations of the camera; in the colors, the lighting, the pacing. The director and the other creative leaders of a production do not come up with all the ideas on their own; rather, every single member of the 200- to 250-person production group makes suggestions. Creativity must be present at every level of every artistic and technical part of the organization. The leaders sort through a mass of ideas to find the ones that fit into a coherent whole—that support the story—which is a very difficult task. It’s like an archaeological dig where you don’t know what you’re looking for or whether you will even find anything. The process is downright scary."

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Pushing Past Political Correctness: Writing Solutions for the Socially Conscious | Beyond The Margins

Pushing Past Political Correctness: Writing Solutions for the Socially Conscious | Beyond The Margins | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
By Becky Tuch In fiction, as in life, people make choices. Sometimes a fictional character’s choices appear self-evident. It’s a given that Jane will want to leave a bad situation or that Sally will struggle to improve her lot.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 14, 4:52 PM

Quite often, the theoretical stances taken in critical theory are a reshuffling of the deck rather than exploring what needs to change and making the changes. We live relationally in the world and the theoretical shuffling is almost like a spectator activity.

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Seeker, Doer, Giver, Ponderer - NYTimes.com

Seeker, Doer, Giver, Ponderer - NYTimes.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
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Take a Sec To Check This Amazing List

Click to see the picture and write a comment...
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The Hidden Rules of Bigotry

The Hidden Rules of Bigotry | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Do people, regardless of their own race and religion and age, have favored (and disfavored) groups that they do not publicly -- or consciously -- proclaim?...

 

University of Virginia scientists Jordan Axt, Charles Ebersole and Brian Nosek wondered not only if social hierarchies persist in the American social memory, but if the same unacknowledged hierarchies are widely endorsed by members of different social groups. One would expect group members to favor their own -- old-fashioned favoritism -- but how about beyond that? Do people -- regardless of their own race and religion and age -- have favored (and disfavored) groups that they do not publicly -- or consciously -- proclaim?

 

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The 10 Greatest Uses of Trash Talk in the History of War

The 10 Greatest Uses of Trash Talk in the History of War | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
History records some badass trash talk that would put Schwarzenegger to shame, some spoken in dire circumstances. Of course, it takes a certain type of badass.
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Immersion journalists discuss their craft

Immersion journalists discuss their craft | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Immersion journalism is about showing, not telling. Talking about “immersion journalism” rather than relaying stories of its execution equates to writing about the framework of Colombian drug trafficking rather than writing the narrative of one specific drug cartel—and we all know what makes a better story. Panelists Raffi Khatchadourian, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, George Packer, and Sarah Stillman—without attempting to flatten immersion journalism into a box—provided great insight into its philosophy and practice. As immersion journalism is about directly and intimately engaging with its subject, the panelists told personal stories of their immersive journalistic experiences without some stolid, distancing interpretation.

 

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Paris Review – The Poet’s Poker, David Zax

Paris Review – The Poet’s Poker, David Zax | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
“Fortunately, he said, writers were easy to read.” The poet’s poker game: http://t.co/pWsWmMteiM
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The Futurist Cookbook: 11 Rules for a Perfect Meal and an Anti-Pasta Manifesto circa 1932

The Futurist Cookbook: 11 Rules for a Perfect Meal and an Anti-Pasta Manifesto circa 1932 | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Optimism at the table, or why the dark void of the soul can't be stuffed with spaghetti. Given my voracious appetite for unusual cookbook
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We Need a Strong Prison System

We Need a Strong Prison System | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
But we need to imprison people for fewer crimes and for less time
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Burnout is a general characteristic of a career in crime; and it is not limited to violent crimes. Often a criminal will realize after having served several prison sentences that crime really doesn’t pay, and he will either find lawful work or live on welfare, charity, and cadging from relatives and friends, in lieu of continuing a life of crime. A good prison work program might even instill in some inmates habits and attitudes conducive to finding and even flourishing in lawful work. But such a program will be expensive."

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Why Do Comedians Become Comedians?

Why Do Comedians Become Comedians? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Childhood experiences of comedians
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Overall, there were no differences in the way comedians describe how their parents treated them, compared to the students’ sample. This means that there is no support to the claim that parents were overprotecting comedians or didn’t give them enough care."

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How Healthy are Stand-up Comedians?

How Healthy are Stand-up Comedians? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Health of stand-up comedians

 

As I discussed in previous posts, the notion that humor is good for your health does not get much empirical support from scientific research. For example, one study found that cheerful kids who have been followed for decades, suffered more health problems and died younger compared to the non-cheerful kids. More specific to comedians, several studies have shown that comedians and humor writers died younger than other people who achieved fame in other areas. Why might that happen?

 
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Weird Shit

Weird Shit | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Forming somewhere between old English to the modern uncanny, weirdness is its own language. Erik Davis offers a brief etymological look at weird, the word, and the place where it lurks in our imagination.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "The roots of weirdness lie in the noun wyrd, an Old English term that pops up in Beowulf and denotes the (usually grim) demands of destiny. The adjective first appears in the phrase weird sisters, which was used by Scottish poets to describe the classical Fates before Shakespeare attached the term to the witches ofMacbeth. But Shakespeare’s spelling of weird is, well, a bit weird—“weyrd”, “weyward”, and “weyard” appear in the first folio, but never “weird”. These alternate spellings, again, suggest the term wayward, a word used by Shakespeare to denote the capricious refusal to follow rule or reason. This suggests to someMacbeth scholars that, in addition to their oracular knowledge, the witches are also defined by their willful resistance to the norm, a perverse and chaotic twist away from the law. Early on, then, weirdness already covers two contrasting but related forces: necessity and anomaly."

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Blackness Ever Blackening: My Lifetime of Depression

Blackness Ever Blackening: My Lifetime of Depression | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How do I explain an existence dominated by the bleakest, darkest moods? And do I even want to?
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666 – Six Maps of Hell | Strange Maps | Big Think

666 – Six Maps of Hell | Strange Maps | Big Think | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
As any Bible reader, numerologist or Iron Maiden fan worth their salt knows, 666 is the Number of the Beast. It says so in Revelation 13:17-18, in wording enigmatic enough to keep conspiracy theologians guessing as to the Beast's true identity: Nero, the Pope, Mussolini, Obama?
And by stupid ...
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Why We Cry: The Science of Sobbing and Emotional Tearing

Why We Cry: The Science of Sobbing and Emotional Tearing | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Why it's easier to prevent a crying spell than to stop one already underway. The human body is an extraordinary machine, and our behavior
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Our unrealistic views of death, through a doctor’s eyes

Our unrealistic views of death, through a doctor’s eyes | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Sometimes medical care can amount to torture.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "These unrealistic expectations often begin with an overestimation of modern medicine’s power to prolong life, a misconception fueled by the dramatic increase in the American life span over the past century. To hear that the average U.S. life expectancy was 47 years in 1900 and 78 years as of 2007, you might conclude that there weren’t a lot of old people in the old days — and that modern medicine invented old age. But average life expectancy is heavily skewed by childhood deaths, and infant mortality rates were high back then. In 1900, the U.S. infant mortality rate was approximately 100 infant deaths per 1,000 live births."

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Renters Trading Size for Frills Fuel U.S. Apartment Boom

Renters Trading Size for Frills Fuel U.S. Apartment Boom | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Katie Graham is living large. Just in a small apartment.
Sharrock's insight:

This is an example of what I was talking about in some conversations about "the knowledge era" economy. The need for space and things become less valuable than infrastructure (as info access), learning, and experiences. Amenities over space. 

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Will You Ride The World's Tallest Water Slide?

Will You Ride The World's Tallest Water Slide? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
It's like sliding off the top of a 15-story building on nothing more than an air mattress. The giant Verrückt water slide stands at 168 feet tall.
Sharrock's insight:
why?
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The Science Of Brainstorming

The Science Of Brainstorming | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Our hunt for the eureka moment may be in vain. New research suggests analogies can help your team come up with great new ideas.

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 7, 9:18 AM

the importance of analogies in creative thinking!