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Rescooped by Sharrock from Digital Presentations in Education
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Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Graphicacy = Visual Literacy + Visual Thinking

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Graphicacy = Visual Literacy + Visual Thinking | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Innovative design crosses over all aspects of education. The American Society for Innovation Design in Education, or ASIDE, seeks to infuse curriculum with new approaches to teaching and thinking.

Don't miss the presentation The 8 Hats of Data Visualisation by Andy Kirk.


Via Baiba Svenca
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Fadhil's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:00 PM

"Doing data visualitation is less a technology problem, more to a people problem."

Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought

The brain is wired in a 3D grid structure. Our brain pathways are organized like woven sheets and not as tangled as once thought | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"The brain appears to be wired in a rectangular 3D grid structure, suggests a new brain imaging study. (...) “Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain’s connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables — folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric,” (...)

 

“The wiring of the mature brain appears to mirror three primal pathways established in embryonic development.” (...) “Before, we had just driving directions. Now, we have a map showing how all the highways and byways are interconnected,” said Wedeen. “Brain wiring is not like the wiring in your basement, where it just needs to connect the right endpoints. Rather, the grid is the language of the brain and wiring and re-wiring work by modifying it.”

//

 

"By looking at how the pathways fit in the brain, we anticipated the connectivity to resemble that of a bowl of spaghetti, a very narrow and discreet object," (...) "We discovered that the pathways in the top of the brain are all organized like woven sheets with the fibers running in two directions in the sheets and in a third direction perpendicular to the sheets. These sheets all stack together so that the entire connectivity of the brain follows three precisely defined directions." (...)
"This is the first time it has ever been determined that the geometry of the brain is described by a three-dimensional grid," (...)

 

"The research took MRI scanners and new mathematical algorithms to determine a geometry to the relationship of nearby pathways in the brain so that each pathway was part of a two-dimensional sheet of pathways that together looked exactly like a woven sheet of fabric," Each pathway was part of a parallel series next to it crossed by a perpendicular series at a right angle, together which formed a woven grid.

 

The structure was part of a three-dimensional scaffold connections of the brain conformed to the extremely simple three-dimensional structure, a single woven grid with fibers in only three axes. By using diffusion MRI and mapping the three-dimension motion of the water molecules in the brain, the scientists ran the maps through mathematical algorithms that inferred from the water motion pattern the fiber architecture of the tissue of the brain." -- http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=123711&org=NSF&from=news


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Writing Process--Developing a Story Idea - Elizabeth Spann Craig

Writing Process--Developing a Story Idea - Elizabeth Spann Craig | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
by Elizabeth S. Craig, @elizabethscraig When I spoke to students recently,  they asked a lot of questions and some very good ones.  Naturally, though, one of the questions, which won’t surprise any writer who talks about his writing, was ‘where do you get your ideas?’  This question is practically mandatory any time you mention writing …

Via Ruth Long
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A SILICON VALLEY DISASTER: A 21-Year-Old Stanford Kid Got $30 Million, Then Everything Blew Up

A SILICON VALLEY DISASTER: A 21-Year-Old Stanford Kid Got $30 Million, Then Everything Blew Up | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Can a startup wunderkind save his startup, Clinkle?
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9 Countries That Hate America Most

9 Countries That Hate America Most | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
From 24/7 Wall St.: International approval of U.S. leadership improved last year, rising from of 41% in 2012 to 46% in 2013. This ended a downward trend in U.S. approval ratings, which had consistently declined since 2009.
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The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade

The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Childhood amnesia descends gradually — and later than you might think, researchers say. Many 7-year-olds have robust memories of experiences from when they were 3 or even younger.
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Introducing Conflict into Your Story | Live Write Thrive

Introducing Conflict into Your Story | Live Write Thrive | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Introducing Conflict into Your Story talks about the central element of conflict in a story and how and when it should be introduced
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Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding

Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Beth Dichter's insight:

Harvard University has a website on visual thinking that is designed for educators and students. Silvia Tolasano, the author of Langwitches Blog, has taken a number of their routines and created visualizations that would be useful for students, visualizations that you might post on your walls or provide copies of for students to put in their binders. 
There is one twist to a number of these  visualizations...they are specific for blogging. The image above includes two of the visualizations. In the post you will find an additional five routines. You will also find an infographic of all the routines within the post available as an infographic

To go directly to the site at Harvard use this link: http://www.old-pz.gse.harvard.edu/vt/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html/. And if you are wondering why you might use visible thinking routines consider this statement from the website on visual thinking (at Harvard): 

"Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to cultivate students' thinking skills and dispositions, and, on the other, to deepen content learning."


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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, April 9, 6:38 AM

These routines have classroom merit, too, as we're trying to get students to think.

Julienne Feeney's curator insight, April 9, 7:21 PM

Complements MYP principles and Learner Profiles beautifully...

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 12, 1:26 PM

This has so much relevance when teaching students questioning and critical thinking skills. Great tool for developing Inquiry based learning strategies. Also, I love an infographic!

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How to Build a Universe: Philip K. Dick on Reality, Media Manipulation, and Human Heroism

How to Build a Universe: Philip K. Dick on Reality, Media Manipulation, and Human Heroism | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." Philip K. Dick is as well-known today for his era-defining scien
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Equations Are Art inside a Mathematician’s Brain

Equations Are Art inside a Mathematician’s Brain | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A brain area associated with emotional reactions to beauty activates when mathematicians view especially pleasing formulas
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Investigating mathematical beauty allowed the researchers to test the role of culture and learning in aesthetic appreciation. The scientists hypothesized that while people with no musical or artistic training can still appreciate Beethoven’s and Michelangelo's works, only those who understand the meaning behind certain mathematical formulas would find them beautiful."

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In Justifiable Homicide Cases, Race Disparity Extends To Women, Too - ThinkProgress

In Justifiable Homicide Cases, Race Disparity Extends To Women, Too - ThinkProgress | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
ThinkProgress
In Justifiable Homicide Cases, Race Disparity Extends To Women, Too
ThinkProgress
Past studies have found that the notorious Stand Your Ground laws that authorize deadly force in self-defense exacerbate racial disparities.

Via Monique, diane gusa
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Storytelling – The New Age Digital Marketing Tool

Storytelling – The New Age Digital Marketing Tool | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This blog post from Activ Eight Dimensions (AED) talks about storytelling and why it is a very important tool in Digital Marketing.

Via José Carlos
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Review: Around the Writer's Block: Using Brain Science to Solve Writer's Resistance

Review: Around the Writer's Block: Using Brain Science to Solve Writer's Resistance | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Initial reaction: I'm actually surprised at how good this was as an expansion on what to do when writers get "writer's block" or otherwise stuck in a variety of different modes. Some of these thing...

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, March 31, 3:20 AM

Full review:

I wasn’t expecting to pick this book up at all – it was a random buy that I got with an Amazon Gift Card and I decided to go book splurging (I’ve had a few book splurges lately, and they’ve been fun – and thankfully within budget). I will confess that I never have problems with writer’s block specifically. You will never see me sit in front of a computer or with a pad of paper not knowing what to write. Never, I always have something to work on, whether I’m freewriting or working on a WIP that’s developed into a larger project. While that might be fortunate to some, I have almost the opposite problem: too many ideas. And I find myself getting “blocked” in a sense that way, because these ideas spark my imagination and I don’t always know which project to do. I’ll pick one of my ideas, write on it a while, get another idea and say “Ooh, shiny” – and write on that, saying that I’ll come back to the former project later.

And the process continues. There are some projects I end up finishing, others…not so much. This book actually addresses that problem and then some, and gives a systematic reason for it with not only brain science expansions, but also presents constructive solutions through habitual commitments and processes. I have to say that I was really impressed by the way Rosanne Bane organized all of this. It addresses writer’s block, perfectionism, excessive critique, distractions among a number of different problems a writer may have that prevent them from writing. I loved the way she deconstructs some of this through process and stages, and makes it easy to understand and follow through specific issues.

The stages of habit for writing that she names: process (writing without boundaries/expectations, creative play), product time (writing with specific goals/aims in mind and projects that further along the actual work), and self-care (sleep, exercise, meditation, etc.) are all important to refilling the creative well and keeping a commitment to the work a writer creates. I think this is not only a process that works for writers, but anyone who works in a creative venture in their day to day lives. This can be really be applied within any profession, and the application for extensions is really nice to see in this.

There are stories of different writerl

Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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Reduce Bias In Analysis: Why Should We Care? (Or: The Effects Of Evidence Weighting On Cognitive Bias And Forecasting Accuracy)

Reduce Bias In Analysis: Why Should We Care? (Or: The Effects Of Evidence Weighting On Cognitive Bias And Forecasting Accuracy) | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

We have done much work in the past on mitigating the effects of cognitive biases in intelligence analysis, as have others. This post, however, is indicative of where we think cognitive bias research should go (and in our case, is going) in the future.  Bottomline: Reducing bias in intelligence analysis is not enough and may not be important at all. 
What analysts should focus on is forecasting accuracy. In fact, our current research suggests that a less biased forecast is not necessarily a more accurate forecast.  More importantly, if indeed bias does not correlate with forecasting accuracy, why should we care about mitigating its effects? In a recent experiment with 115 intel students, I investigated a mechanism that I think operates at the root of the cognitive bias polemic: Evidence weightin


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 31, 1:34 PM

It makes sense that if you just look at a given set of information from the outside world you should be able to reach some intuitive conclusions about the information.  The question then becomes whether or not the information that is presented is accurately reflecting the reality that is there in the first place.

 

This shows up in politics and government a lot, as people seek out irrelevant information to back up a pre-existing opinion or belief, rather than seek out the technical truths of the matter that are relevant to the situation at hand.  This is, unfortunately, how things get messed up pretty badly in our governing world, which then bleeds over into our social, economic and environmental worlds as well.

 

It's when we behave as lawyers instead of scientists that we run into problems; seeking for non-related facts and spins that support our bias rather than seeking out the technical truths of the matter.  It's not a difficult thing to do, for some.  But it seems that, for many in government, it is incredibly difficult indeed to focus on the reality rather than the opinion of reality.

 

Think about it.

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These Maps Show Just How Segregated NYC Really Is

These Maps Show Just How Segregated NYC Really Is | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
New York City may be one of the most diverse cities in the world, but it's also one of the most segregated cities in the United States.
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Always Communicate the Why - George Ambler

Always Communicate the Why - George Ambler | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Communication is most importance to leaders. One problem we spend too much time communicating the "what" and the "how" and don't devote enough time to the "why".

Via Grant Montgomery
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The Secret To Writing Great Titles

The Secret To Writing Great Titles | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Why did you click on this article? Hopefully, it's because you were intrigued by the promise made in the title.
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Dealing With Death on the Railroad

Dealing With Death on the Railroad | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Railroads have seen a recent uptick in highway-rail crossing and trespassing fatalities.
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What can you learn from a trip to Disney World

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100 Recommended Search Engines for Serious Scholars

100 Recommended Search Engines for Serious Scholars | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Check out this new, up-to-date collection to discover the very best search engine for finding the academic results you’re looking for.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Six Easy Tips for Self-Editing Your Fiction

Six Easy Tips for Self-Editing Your Fiction | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are many editors who charge by the hour. If they're spending their time fixing blunders you could've easily repaired yourself? You're burning cash and time. Yet, correct these problems, and e...

Via Ruth Long
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Overloaded with information, students need critical thinking skills - University World News

We must accept that we can no longer afford the luxury of believing that higher education exists in a ‘content delivery’ model. As Keeling articulated in Learning Reconsidered: A campus-wide focus on the student experience: “…knowledge is no longer a scarce – or stable – commodity. [It] is changing so rapidly that specific information may become obsolete before a studentgraduates and has the opportunity to apply it.”

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Based on the work of George Kuh and others, many institutions are placing an emphasis on ‘high-impact practices’. According to the report, College Learning for the New Global Century, these are “…teaching and learning practices that have been widely tested and have been shown to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds”.

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33 Unusual Tips to Being a Better Writer

33 Unusual Tips to Being a Better Writer | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Back in college, Sanket and I would hang out in bars and try to talk to women but I was horrible at it. Nobody would talk to me for more than thirty seconds and every woman would laugh at all his
Sharrock's insight:

I forget tips. These are simple reminders to keep in mind when writing. 

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Gobbledygook generator

This page generates random examples of business jargon.

Via Ken Morrison
Sharrock's insight:

This would be awesome for comedy writing around business.

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Ken Morrison's curator insight, March 30, 9:26 AM

The solution can only be deconstructed through proactive strategic matrix approaches.

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Plotting by Yes or No

Ruth Long 's insight:

Basic scene structure says a scene can end in one of four ways. A yes, a no, a yes but there's a catch, or a no and it makes things worse. These are questions designed to move the story forward and advance the plot. Some work better than others, because they leave more room for things to happen and give you as the writer a place to go. If you always write scenes with yes or no answers, you might find yourself getting stuck, or making it too easy on your protagonist. 

You can use this yes or no approach at the end of every scene, or you can layer it throughout the scene to keep the reader asking questions and being drawn more into what's happening. I'm going to use a movie as the example, but the same principles apply to novels. Movies are just easier to study since they're visual and more people have likely seen them.


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Ruth Long 's curator insight, March 30, 8:27 PM

Basic scene structure says a scene can end in one of four ways. A yes, a no, a yes but there's a catch, or a no and it makes things worse. These are questions designed to move the story forward and advance the plot. Some work better than others, because they leave more room for things to happen and give you as the writer a place to go. If you always write scenes with yes or no answers, you might find yourself getting stuck, or making it too easy on your protagonist.

You can use this yes or no approach at the end of every scene, or you can layer it throughout the scene to keep the reader asking questions and being drawn more into what's happening. I'm going to use a movie as the example, but the same principles apply to novels. Movies are just easier to study since they're visual and more people have likely seen them.
 

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39 Blogging Tips From the Pros

39 Blogging Tips From the Pros | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Use these blogging tips to consistently create, present and share stronger content that your readers want and create a better blog for your business.

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Great Unsung Science Fiction Authors That Everybody Should Read

Great Unsung Science Fiction Authors That Everybody Should Read | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Science fiction contains more masterpieces of the imagination than anyone could read in a single lifetime. And your local used book store or science fiction bookshop is teeming with great adventures you've never discovered.
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