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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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How to Write Funny

Do you want to know how to write funny? In this article you'll learn the secrets of how to write funny.
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Subjects & Concepts - Writing Commons

Subjects & Concepts - Writing Commons | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Writing Commons is a free, comprehensive, peer-reviewed,
award-winning Open Text for students and faculty in college-level courses that require writing and research.
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The Rise of the Nameless Narrator in Fiction

The Rise of the Nameless Narrator in Fiction | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

In recent years, a curious number of novelists have declined to avail themselves of a basic prerogative: naming their creations.


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How to Figure Out WHAT Your Character's Arc Should Be - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Figure Out WHAT Your Character's Arc Should Be - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Picking the character's arc that's perfect for your story requires nothing more than the answers to three questions.
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Write clear

Write clear | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Want your writing to be clear, concise, and compelling?  Do you in fact, get the opposite:  muddy, laborious, and bland?  It might be because you are trying too hard too early. Composer Aaron Copeland said, “Inspiration may be a form of the super-conscious or the subconscious, I wouldn’t know.  But I am positive it is …
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt:

As you edit, ask the following questions:

How can I say what I want to say in less words?How can I make those words more vivid and compelling?What example would add clarity?What sentences or paragraphs are extra–they add words but not impact?When have I used a 5 dollar word when a clearer 50 cent word would be better?Do I need to add more details to make a specific point or example vivid?Is there a way I could speak to the reader’s heart as well as his or her head?
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The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century - YouTube

WHY IS SO MUCH WRITING SO BAD, and how can we make it better? Is the English language being corrupted by texting and social media? Do people write badly on purpose, to obfuscate and impress? Have dictionaries abandoned their responsibility to safeguard correct usage? Do kids today even care about good writing? In his latest book the Harvard linguist, cognitive scientist, bestselling author (The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, and The Better Angels of Our Nature) and chair of the Usage Panel of The American Heritage Dictionary, Dr. Steven Pinker, answers these questions and more. Pinker applies insights from the sciences of language and mind to the challenge of crafting clear, coherent, and stylish prose. Filled with examples of great and gruesome modern prose, The Sense of Style shows how the art of writing can be a form of pleasurable mastery and a fascinating intellectual topic in its own right, that is also informed by science. A book signing will follow the lecture.

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How to break 10 original news stories a week

How to break 10 original news stories a week | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
This module, 'Issue-led journalism' explores how a simple editorial strategy can guarentee a steady stream of up to 10 original stories a week.

Via Andy Bull
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Janet Vasil's curator insight, January 12, 12:21 PM

Think like a journalist to find your brand stories.

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6 Ways to Make Money as an Author (in Addition to Selling Books) | Lindsay Buroker

6 Ways to Make Money as an Author (in Addition to Selling Books) | Lindsay Buroker | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The "KU Apocalypse," as some writers have called it, has cut into the bottom line for many independent authors, especially those who have refused to participate

Via Ruth Long
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8 Elements to NAILING Your Plot & Owning NaNo

8 Elements to NAILING Your Plot & Owning NaNo | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
I promised not to leave you guys hanging with my last post. Now that I have a lot of you beating your shields ready for NaNo, I'm going to give you battle tactics to come out victorious (or maybe a...

Via Ruth Long
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How to Use Rewards and Punishments to Get Your Character to Change - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Use Rewards and Punishments to Get Your Character to Change - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How do you get your character to change? As simple as this question may seem, it's also an important question that deserves a practical answer.
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The Art of Fearless Storytelling: 10 Tips to Become a Better Writer.

The Art of Fearless Storytelling: 10 Tips to Become a Better Writer. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
By Stephanie Spence (RT @saradjcanning: 10 simple reminders. Homework. http://t.co/Rrqykga7LA)
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Dense Words: It's only dancing; how to describe music, poetry and fighting

Dense Words: It's only dancing; how to describe music, poetry and fighting | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
how to write a fight scene in fiction
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Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants

Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant - not being a servant to the words. It's a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they're about half way through the first boo...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, August 31, 2014 8:29 PM
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant – not being a servant to the words. It’s a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they’re about half way through the first book and are finding the words mastering them, not the other way around.

I re-pitched my history of New Zealand for its second edition, altering the tone to bring the writing up to date.

It has to be addressed. And there is, alas, only one way to do that. That’s right – practise. But that shouldn’t be a chore – writing’s fun, right?

Once you’ve made words your servant – and your friend – you can start paying attention to the equally crucial matters of content, tone and style – together, what we might call ‘voice’. This isn’t something that just happens; it can be directed and controlled, just like any other aspect of writing. Take George McDonald Fraser’s Flashman, a novel about the bully from Tom Brown’s Schooldays, grown up and turned Victorian-age military hero. Fraser presented it as a ‘found memoir’ – which it wasn’t – but buoyed the conceit with such a subtle ‘1840’ period tone to his words that at least one reviewer was taken in.

It works in non-fiction, too. Recently I re-wrote one of my earlier books, a kids’ book pitched for 8 year olds, into a young adult-and-older account pitched for the 12+ bracket. It had to be completely re-written to do so – with full attention to the language, content and tone. I also re-pitched my history of New Zealand, when it came around to the second edition, to modernise the writing.

The trick to achieving that  control – something superficially easy to do but very hard to actually master. It takes a long time for writers to be able to consciously control the tone. But it’s an essential writing skill, and one that improves with practise. My tips? Try this:

1. Pick a passage by (say) your favourite author. What defines the tone? Look through a passage for key words – terms that give flavour. Check the pacing, the ‘beats’. Look for sentence length and paragraphing. Is it present or past tense? Examine the material closely and make notes.

2. Now try writing a passage at least 750 words long, of your own, in the same style, with the same cadence, word selection and rhythms.

3. Didn’t work? Of course not, it won’t the first time. But this is an exercise…and you know what exercises mean. Yup – do it again.

4. And again.

5. And again (etc).

It’s the only way. Did I mention you then throw the exercises away? Words are not precious babies, still less numeric targets. They’re tools, and they’re disposable. You can always write more.

The point is that when you’ve mastered tone, you’re more than half way to controllingvoice, content and style. Writing will be your servant. Not the other way around. And there’s one other benefit that comes out of doing all this. With the quality comes that most precious of all skills that writers can have – speed.

Do you deliberately throw away ‘practise writing’? How do you extend yourself when writing?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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21 Hacks for Word for Writers

21 Hacks for Word for Writers | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Many of us use the same medium to craft our documents – Microsoft Word. Few of us know how to tap into its full potential as a tool of the trade. Here are 21 essential hacks for any writer working in Word.
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An Ethical Checklist for Robot Journalism | Mediashift | PBS

An Ethical Checklist for Robot Journalism | Mediashift | PBS | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
News organizations are experimenting increasingly with robot journalism, using computer programs to transform data into news stories, or news stories into multimedia presentations.

Most uses of robot journalism have been for fairly formulaic situations — company earnings reports, stock market summaries, earthquake alerts and youth sports stories. But inevitably, news companies will be testing automatic news writing on more challenging subjects.

What are the ethics of robot journalism? When editors consider using automated news writing, what issues of accuracy, quality and transparency arise?

Via Jeff Domansky
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How would we cite this machine-author resource in research? 

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 4, 11:52 PM

Need for concern or just another unstoppable trend and evolution?

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The Impact Character: Why Every Character Arc Needs One - Helping Writers Become Authors

The Impact Character: Why Every Character Arc Needs One - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
“Impact character” is the term coined by Dramatica authors Melanie Anne Phillips and Chris Huntley to describe what is just as accurately termed by editor Roz Morris the “catalyst character.” This is the character who slams into your protagonist, catalyzes him into change, and has a major impact on his life.
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How to Improve Your Writing Style in 10 Minutes or FewerWritersDigest.com | WritersDigest.com

How to Improve Your Writing Style in 10 Minutes or FewerWritersDigest.com | WritersDigest.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Everyone can benefit from the occasional reminder of the principles of strong writing. Below are 10 tips and exercises designed to make your writing more clear and concise. Think of them as a 10-minute refresher course. by Brandon Royal
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Advice: Don't Try to Write Like David Foster Wallace

Advice: Don't Try to Write Like David Foster Wallace | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Atlantic This is bad to admit, but are times in my professional life when, facing some crisis about commas or contributors or other journalistic things, I turn for comfort to Ann Friedman’s now-defunct gif blog “#Realtalk From Your Editor.” And...
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Lorrie Moore on the Difficulties of Constructing a Writing Life

Lorrie Moore on the Difficulties of Constructing a Writing Life | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
From the time I first started writing, the trick for me has always been to construct a life in which writing could occur. I have never been blocked, never lost faith (or never lost it for longer th...

Via Sharon Bakar
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The 10 greatest changes of the past 1,000 years

The 10 greatest changes of the past 1,000 years | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The last millennium has been shaped by successive waves of change, but which shifts have played the largest part in shaping the modern world? Historian Ian Mortimer identifies the ten leading factors which have driven change over the past 1,000 years
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these changes can help with world building in fiction writing as well as in understanding history and the impacts of social technologies in history. It certainly put the Game of Thrones universe in perspective. Teachers might also use this short article to help introduce students to global history as well as to histories of a specific country. These treatments might help with writing for exams.

 

 

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Neaten Up Your Writing With Parallelism | Online Writing Jobs

Neaten Up Your Writing With Parallelism | Online Writing Jobs | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Sometimes, sentences simply sound better when you use parallelism. Learn what it is and how to use it to make your sentences and paragraphs easier to read. It's
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How to Find Your Character's Breaking Point - Helping Writers Become Authors

How to Find Your Character's Breaking Point - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The most important moment in your story is your character's breaking point. Discover how to time the breaking point so it accomplishes everything it must.
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Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors

Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Shares the single most effective trick EVER for creating a realistic, compelling, and powerful bad guy.
Sharrock's insight:

I read some of the same exploration in John Gardner's On Moral Fiction. Actions of a major character, no matter how seemingly extreme or destructive, needs to be explained in terms of character, motivations, incidents and responses to those incidents. This is one of the most powerful indicators towards post-modernism, the idea that there are no black and white bad guys. The Game of Thrones books does this to a great degree (so much so that "goodness" does not insure one's survival nor that "sadism"--evil--insure a violent, ironic death). History, and the stories told about motivations and actions, support those motivations and actions, just as well as BIG-C creativity can only be supported in retrospect. Sometimes, the expression "let history be my judge" can be a bit melodramatic, but something similar might need to be said.

 

 Andrea Kuszewski explored this issue using science findings http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/03/31/walking-the-line-between-good-and-evil-the-common-thread-of-heroes-and-villains/  to support another way writers might develop evil characters.

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