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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors

Maybe Your Bad Guy Is RIGHT! - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Shares the single most effective trick EVER for creating a realistic, compelling, and powerful bad guy.
Sharrock's insight:

I read some of the same exploration in John Gardner's On Moral Fiction. Actions of a major character, no matter how seemingly extreme or destructive, needs to be explained in terms of character, motivations, incidents and responses to those incidents. This is one of the most powerful indicators towards post-modernism, the idea that there are no black and white bad guys. The Game of Thrones books does this to a great degree (so much so that "goodness" does not insure one's survival nor that "sadism"--evil--insure a violent, ironic death). History, and the stories told about motivations and actions, support those motivations and actions, just as well as BIG-C creativity can only be supported in retrospect. Sometimes, the expression "let history be my judge" can be a bit melodramatic, but something similar might need to be said.

 

 Andrea Kuszewski explored this issue using science findings http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/03/31/walking-the-line-between-good-and-evil-the-common-thread-of-heroes-and-villains/  to support another way writers might develop evil characters.

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The Principles of Character Motivation | WritersDigest.com

The Principles of Character Motivation | WritersDigest.com | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Explore the principles of human nature, including resentment and revenge, and how it can lead to character development and motivation.
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Analysing characterisation in operatic arias

Analysing characterisation in operatic arias | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A guide to analysing operatic arias with the emphasis on techniques of musical characterisation. 1. a blank template 2. an example of the template filled in. The blank template.     &nbsp...
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Actor's studio method for increasing drama - Now Novel

Actor's studio method for increasing drama - Now Novel | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Method acting is an approach to the craft in which actors attempt to stay in character for the duration of a film shoot or the run of a play. Many aspects of method acting can be applied to writing fiction as well to ratchet up dramatic tension.
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Handouts: database and research guides | University Libraries | Virginia Tech

PDF copies of all research, subject, database, and services guides available from the University Libraries. 

Sharrock's insight:

Researching guides for use of databases.

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Key Sentence Skeletons

Key Sentence Skeletons | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Is there a recipe for the 10 key sentences? This post is about an easy way to work out what to write the 10 key sentences that define a grant application. There are two reasons I think it's worth w...
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What's the Most Important Element of a Good Story?

What's the Most Important Element of a Good Story? | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
What makes a story great? The storytellers behind House of Cards, This American Life, The Moth, and more reflect on the creative process.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Presentation Zen: 10 Storytelling tips from Billy Wilder

Presentation Zen: 10 Storytelling tips from Billy Wilder | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Billy Wilder (1906–2002) was the first person to win an Academy Award as producer, director and screenwriter for the same film. The film The Apartment (1960) stared Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, and Fred MacMurray and is certainly in my top-10...

Via Art Jones
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Art Jones's curator insight, July 2, 3:12 PM

After 50 years of film making Billy Wilder shares his top 10 storytelling tips.

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Want to Write Great Science Fiction? Read Classic Literature

Want to Write Great Science Fiction? Read Classic Literature | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Sharrock's insight:

Focused reading of exemplars (master works) will improve writing.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, May 15, 5:51 AM


Esther Inglis-Arkell:  "Worldbuilding is a major challenge for science fiction creators -- building a plausible world from scratch involves thinking about lots of variables. But sometimes, to imagine the future, the best way is to look to the past. Classic literature can help you build a world more believably alien than anything you've yet imagined."

Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, May 15, 10:56 AM

Worldbuilding is a major challenge for science fiction creators — building a plausible world from scratch involves thinking about lots of variables.But sometimes, to imagine the future, the best way is to look to the past.


Classic literature can help you build a world more believably alien than anything you've yet imagined.


You will find great tips here and be sure not to skip the comments.

Click the headline.

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Power Up Your Writing Workflow: Make Better Use Of Scrivener

Power Up Your Writing Workflow: Make Better Use Of Scrivener | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
When it comes to getting a research paper, ebook or novel completed, Scrivener can help you stay organized and motivated — that is, if you know how to use some of its best features. Our free PDF Guide to Scrivener explores what the software can really do, and why many feel it's the best writing program available for…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Greek fire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Greek fire

Greek fire was an incendiary weapon used by the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire. The Byzantines typically used it in naval battles to great effect as it could continue burning while floating on water. It provided a technological advantage, and was responsible for many key Byzantine military victories, most notably the salvation of Constantinople from two Arab sieges, thus securing the Empire's survival.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

In popular culture[edit]

Greek fire made an appearance in the 2011 film Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides as a naval weapon used by the character Blackbeard, as well as in the video games Assassin's Creed: Revelations and Medieval II: Total War: Kingdoms.

Both the academic discussion around Greek fire and a medieval demonstration of it appear in the 1999 novel Timeline and its 2003 film adaption.

A similar substance, known as "wildfire", is used in a naval battle in the book A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin. This green substance is deployed in fragile clay jars, never from tubes, and is apparently partly magical in nature, but, like Greek fire, it burns on water.

A self-igniting liquid was referred to as "Greek fire" in Season 1 Episodes 7-11 of the BBC America television series Copper.

Greek fire was used in the episode "The Mask of Doom, Part III" of the Fantastic Four 1994 TV series to thwart the Persians and Dr Doom.

Greek fire is a common weapon used in the Percy Jackson & the Olympians series, as well as its spin-off series, The Heroes of Olympus. Rick Riordan's version of the weapon is green, however.

Called Byzantine fire, it was used in the last episode of Robin Hood (2006 TV series). Greek fire also plays a part in the saving the city of Boston from destruction in the novel, "The Technologists" by Matthew Pearl (Random House, 2012).

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The Silver Age of Science Fiction

The Silver Age of Science Fiction | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Welcome back to the British Genre Fiction Focus, Tor.com’s regular round-up of book news from the United Kingdom’s thriving speculative fiction industry.
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Think Ink: Psychology for Writers: How Can Your Characters Make Others Believe Them? [Post 1/2] // The Subtleties of Dialogue

Think Ink: Psychology for Writers: How Can Your Characters Make Others Believe Them? [Post 1/2] // The Subtleties of Dialogue | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

When we tell stories of past events, place blame and offer to do things, we have a reason for doing so, and often it's because we have a personal interest in presenting things in a certain way—a stake in the matter. If our listeners pick up on these ulterior motives, such as telling a strange story to get attention, rather than because it truly happened, it can undermine our actions or challenge our stories.


Via Ruth Long
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Urban Book Editor's curator insight, May 10, 8:45 AM

I like this approach to character. It takes into account the way our characters use words. Phrasing can completely change the interpretation of a sentence or a passage.

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The Art of Fearless Storytelling: 10 Tips to Become a Better Writer.

The Art of Fearless Storytelling: 10 Tips to Become a Better Writer. | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
By Stephanie Spence (RT @saradjcanning: 10 simple reminders. Homework. http://t.co/Rrqykga7LA)
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Dense Words: It's only dancing; how to describe music, poetry and fighting

Dense Words: It's only dancing; how to describe music, poetry and fighting | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
how to write a fight scene in fiction
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Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants

Essential writing skills: how to make words your servants | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant - not being a servant to the words. It's a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they're about half way through the first boo...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, August 31, 8:29 PM
Half the battle for writers is making writing their servant – not being a servant to the words. It’s a lesson novice writers usually only discover after they’re about half way through the first book and are finding the words mastering them, not the other way around.

I re-pitched my history of New Zealand for its second edition, altering the tone to bring the writing up to date.

It has to be addressed. And there is, alas, only one way to do that. That’s right – practise. But that shouldn’t be a chore – writing’s fun, right?

Once you’ve made words your servant – and your friend – you can start paying attention to the equally crucial matters of content, tone and style – together, what we might call ‘voice’. This isn’t something that just happens; it can be directed and controlled, just like any other aspect of writing. Take George McDonald Fraser’s Flashman, a novel about the bully from Tom Brown’s Schooldays, grown up and turned Victorian-age military hero. Fraser presented it as a ‘found memoir’ – which it wasn’t – but buoyed the conceit with such a subtle ‘1840’ period tone to his words that at least one reviewer was taken in.

It works in non-fiction, too. Recently I re-wrote one of my earlier books, a kids’ book pitched for 8 year olds, into a young adult-and-older account pitched for the 12+ bracket. It had to be completely re-written to do so – with full attention to the language, content and tone. I also re-pitched my history of New Zealand, when it came around to the second edition, to modernise the writing.

The trick to achieving that  control – something superficially easy to do but very hard to actually master. It takes a long time for writers to be able to consciously control the tone. But it’s an essential writing skill, and one that improves with practise. My tips? Try this:

1. Pick a passage by (say) your favourite author. What defines the tone? Look through a passage for key words – terms that give flavour. Check the pacing, the ‘beats’. Look for sentence length and paragraphing. Is it present or past tense? Examine the material closely and make notes.

2. Now try writing a passage at least 750 words long, of your own, in the same style, with the same cadence, word selection and rhythms.

3. Didn’t work? Of course not, it won’t the first time. But this is an exercise…and you know what exercises mean. Yup – do it again.

4. And again.

5. And again (etc).

It’s the only way. Did I mention you then throw the exercises away? Words are not precious babies, still less numeric targets. They’re tools, and they’re disposable. You can always write more.

The point is that when you’ve mastered tone, you’re more than half way to controllingvoice, content and style. Writing will be your servant. Not the other way around. And there’s one other benefit that comes out of doing all this. With the quality comes that most precious of all skills that writers can have – speed.

Do you deliberately throw away ‘practise writing’? How do you extend yourself when writing?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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The 5 Most Common Writing Mistakes That Break Reader Immersion | Creativity Hacker

The 5 Most Common Writing Mistakes That Break Reader Immersion | Creativity Hacker | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Today marks the publication of the 50th review in my ImmerseOrDie indie book review series.
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Download 70 Screenplays Legally and Free

Download 70 Screenplays Legally and Free | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A list of downloads for around 70 screenplays.
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Tips on Performing Research for a Historical Novel

Tips on Performing Research for a Historical Novel | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
A well-written historical novel will have many hours of research behind it. How to conduct such research and points to consider when creating a story within a historical context.

Via Laura Brown
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Ambivalent Men and the Women Who Love Them

Ambivalent Men and the Women Who Love Them | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The non-committal, emotionally unavailable man pairing with an overly attentive female who is willing to hang in there--no matter what--is a surprisingly common relationship. Always eager to sew wild oats, the male in this dynamic is frequently described as a "player.”

Why in this scenario does the female stay true to such a man? It may be because she believes his very aloofness makes him a more desirable catch. If she hangs in there long enough, he will eventually commit, and it will mean so much more because he was so ambivalent about her in the beginning. She sees a chance for self-validation in earning his attention when others couldn't.

Women caught in this circular thinking rarely experience a happy romantic ending. 

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Ten things you can write in ten minutes or less

Ten things you can write in ten minutes or less | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
If you think you need to set aside big chunks of time to write something creative, you're wrong.
Of course it's great to have a period of two or three

Via Laura Brown
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The 7 Types of Literary Conflict

The 7 Types of Literary Conflict | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
It is an essential element of plot as without it there is no movement in a story. Conflict is one of the most important aspects of writing any narrative, the main struggle that tests the characters and keeps their story moving forward. Without conflict, th...

Via Laura Brown
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What's the story about stories?

Conflict lies at the heart of storytelling, says Martin Lee. The researcher’s task is to find that conflict within the brief – and then resolve it.

 

 

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Top 10 Glaring Movie Courtroom Mistakes | The Expert Witness

Nothing is perfect in this world and this includes movie courtroom scenes as well. While most directors tend to spend a lot of time in fine-tuning the acting and the script, many small mistakes are overlooked. We have compiled a list of the Top 10 Glaring Movie Courtroom Mistakes for you to enjoy. If you have not noticed them before, then this is a good chance to watch your favorite movies again!

 

- See more at: http://www.iveyengineering.com/blog/movie-courtroom-mistakes/#sthash.AKu0JFDQ.dpuf

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Unprepared

Unprepared | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
As the school year winds down and many parents of high school seniors prepare to send their kids off to college in the fall, Slate wanted to share one father’s experience of coming to terms with this next chapter in parenthood.
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