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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The Daily Routine Of Creativity -

The Daily Routine Of Creativity - | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Daily Routine Of Creativity by TeachThought Staff What sort of habits lead to creativity? Well, we first have to imagine these kinds of habits as causal–that is, the habits cause the creativity, rather than...

Via Adrian Bertolini, Lynnette Van Dyke
Sharrock's insight:

This is nice to use to support whatever style and habits you use to create. We all need our magic feathers to motivate and encourage us towards completing unstructured tasks. It strikes me though that the chart says nothing definite at all. Some of the creatives had "day jobs", some did not. Some were literary creatives while others were musical or  were visual/2-D artists while others still are philosophers. Then there are the one or two scientists (depending on how you describe the method Freud uses compared to Darwin's method).

 

What is missing? How do we characterize "creative work"? Is this only the production part of the creativity or does it include the creative's research? For example, many writers research by reading the works of of others to explore how certain effects are achieved. Others research into how certain characters might have achieved the social/emotional/intellectual points they have achieved. Domain-specific creativity may have commonalities within the domains. We are not seeing what these are by ignoring the "work" or "study" of creativity. I will have to read the study cited here.

 

In other words, other than the suggestion that we should suspend our disbelief and critical thinking skills to accept that "Well, we first have to imagine these kinds of habits as causal–that is, the habits cause the creativity, rather than the reverse", there really doesn't appear to be any obvious takeaways that support the statement that you need rest, exercise, and creative activity. Mozart didn't need exercise apparently. Neither did Franklyn nor O'Connor nor Balzac (and there are others). I would consider Franklyn, O'Connor, and Mozart as the genius's geniuses. Although I have no idea who Corbusier is--I'll have to Google him/her--I can't see why we are being directed to this chart as though it is evidence supporting anything. The disclaimer basically says the same thing: "Disclaimer: The above info doesn’t characterize the entire life of each person but a specific period of time as recorded in diaries, letters and other documentation." If you are someone on the lookout for the narrative fallacy, this would set off flags. 


But I know how it can happen that the summary of a document leaves out the important points and methodology, including a larger population size charted out possibly. It might indicate that the authors read the much larger document, and assumed that the summary was enough.


I will have to read the larger document. The summary was not enough.


I am interested in the topic though. I am on the lookout for studies that explore the influence of daily schedules and habits on creative productivity. 

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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, March 8, 7:07 PM

Fascinating to see how some of the world's most creative individuals structured their day

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The Land Where the Blues Began

The Land Where the Blues Began | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
In the late 1970s Alan Lomax traveled to Mississippi with filmmaker John Bishop and folklorist Worth Long and made this film about the African American music he found there.

 

The Land Where the Blues Began is one of five films made from footage that Alan Lomax shot between 1978 and 1985 for the PBS American Patchwork series (1991). A self-described "song-hunter," Alan Lomax traveled the Mississippi Delta in the 1930s and 40s, at first with his father John Lomax, later in the company sometimes of black folklorists like John W. Work III, armed with primitive recording equipment and a keen love of the Delta's music heritage. Crisscrossing the towns and hamlets, jook joints and dance halls, prisons and churches, Lomax recorded such greats as Leadbelly, Fred McDowell, and Muddy Waters, all of whom made their debut recordings with him.

 

In the late 1970s Lomax returned with filmmaker John Bishop and black folklorist Worth Long to make the film The Land Where the Blues Began. Shot on video tape, the film is narrated by Lomax and includes remarkable performances and stories by Johnny Brooks, Walter Brown, Bill Gordon, James Hall, William S. Hart, Beatrice and Clyde Maxwell, Jack Owens, Wilbert Puckett, J. T. Tucker, Reverend Caesar Smith, Bud Spires, Belton Sutherland, and Othar Turner The Association for Cultural Equity’s Alan Lomax Archive channel on YouTube additionally streams outtakes from this film: other strong performances by Walter Brown, Sam Chatmon, Clyde Maxwell, Jack Owens, Joe Savage, Bud Spires, Napoleon Strickland, and Othar Turner. Turner is also in Gravel Springs Fife and Drum on Folkstreams.

Alan Lomax's book by the same title won the 1993 National Book Critics Award for nonfiction.

No one has come close to Alan Lomax in illuminating the intersecting musical roots of an extraordinary range of cultures, including our own.
--- Nat Hentoff

Sharrock's insight:

Creativity and inspiration can come from exploring this regional and class specific creation of music.

 

 

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Changing expectations and rising inequality make today's best marriages better than ever, while undermining today's average marriages

Changing expectations and rising inequality make today's best marriages better than ever, while undermining today's average marriages | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Today Americans are looking to their marriages to fulfill different goals than in the past - and although the fulfillment of these goals requires especially large investments of time and energy...
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6 Ways to Make Money as an Author (in Addition to Selling Books) | Lindsay Buroker

6 Ways to Make Money as an Author (in Addition to Selling Books) | Lindsay Buroker | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The "KU Apocalypse," as some writers have called it, has cut into the bottom line for many independent authors, especially those who have refused to participate

Via Ruth Long
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Knowledge worker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Knowledge worker

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page . Knowledge workers are workers whose main capital is knowledge. Typical examples may include software engineers, doctors, architects, engineers, scientists, public accountants, lawyers, and teachers, because they "think for a living".

Another, more recent breakdown of knowledge work (author unknown) shows activity that ranges from tasks performed by individual knowledge workers to global social networks. This framework spans every class of knowledge work that is being or is likely to be undertaken. There are seven levels or scales of knowledge work, with references for each are cited.

Knowledge work (e.g., writing, analyzing, advising) is performed by subject-matter specialists in all areas of an organization. Although knowledge work began with the origins of writing and counting, it was first identified as a category of work by Drucker (1973).[15]Knowledge functions (e.g., capturing, organizing, and providing access to knowledge) are performed by technical staff, to support knowledge processes projects. Knowledge functions date from c. 450 BC, with the Library of Alexandria,[dubious – discuss] but their modern roots can be linked to the emergence of information management in the 1970s.[16]Knowledge processes (preserving, sharing, integration) are performed by professional groups, as part of a knowledge management program. Knowledge processes have evolved in concert with general-purpose technologies, such as the printing press, mail delivery, the telegraph, telephone networks, and the Internet.[17]Knowledge management programs link the generation of knowledge (e.g., from science, synthesis, or learning) with its use (e.g., policy analysis, reporting, program management) as well as facilitating organizational learning and adaptation in a knowledge organization. Knowledge management emerged as a discipline in the 1990s (Leonard, 1995)[full citation needed].Knowledge organizations transfer outputs (content, products, services, and solutions), in the form of knowledge services, to enable external use. The concept of knowledge organizations emerged in the 1990s.[13]Knowledge services support other organizational services, yield sector outcomes, and result in benefits for citizens in the context of knowledge markets. Knowledge services emerged as a subject in the 2000s.[18]Social media networks enable knowledge organizations to co-produce knowledge outputs by leveraging their internal capacity with massive social networks. Social networking emerged in the 2000s [19]

The hierarchy ranges from the effort of individual specialists, through technical activity, professional projects, and management programs, to organizational strategy, knowledge markets, and global-scale networking.

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Young People Wait Out the Recession…and Their Youth - Working In These Times

Young People Wait Out the Recession…and Their Youth - Working In These Times | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Useful as English Language Arts and social studies class resource. What did the las "Lost Generation" accomplish?
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