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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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Planning a Workshop: Organizing and Running a Successful Event

Planning a Workshop: Organizing and Running a Successful Event | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Planning a great workshop needn't be an overwhelming experience. This article gives step-by-step instructions for planning a great event.
Sharrock's insight:

awesome tip: "Sometimes, not everyone has to stay for the entire workshop. For instance, the CEO might be too busy to attend the whole session. Identify which sections your busiest participants need to attend, and suggest in advance when they might want to arrive and leave. They'll appreciate your consideration."

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How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library

How to Get Students to Believe in Themselves | The New York Public Library | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
How many times do you hear students in your classroom or library say, “I can’t”? Doesn’t that phrase make you cringe? I always tell students, "Don’t say that because you can,” and help them figure out ways to reach their goals.

Via Pamela D Lloyd
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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, January 22, 1:46 AM

Such useful advice in so many contexts.

 

Now, eat your goldfish crackers!

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Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post

Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Washington Post's Sandra G. Boodman is looking for challenging medical cases--ones that have been resolved but in which the patient's symptoms were puzzling to doctors or suggested an immediate diagnosis that would have been wrong.
Sharrock's insight:

In some ways, better than TV because they are real. Some of the tv show episodes were apparently based on one or two of these articles. Some bring to mind what Daniel Kahneman states about expert intuition in Thinking, Fast and Slow: "Intuition is nothing more and nothing less than recognition." Daniel Sivers also noted from the book "Valid intuitions develop when experts have learned to recognize familiar elements in a new situation and to act in a manner that is appropriate to it." Key ideas are experience, expertise, dignostics, and training. But trust and perseverence also come to mind.

 

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Study: Musical Training Teaches Us to Detect Our Own Mistakes and rapidly make needed adjustments

Study: Musical Training Teaches Us to Detect Our Own Mistakes and rapidly make needed adjustments | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
New research finds musical training appears to sharpen our ability to detect our own mistakes, and rapidly make needed adjustments.

Via Amira
Sharrock's insight:
Amira's insight:

"According to this research, people who spend many hours in the practice room not only process information unusually efficiently, but they also do a superior job of not letting occasional errors derail them.

These findings "suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed," (...) In addition, “higher levels of musical practice were also associated with a better engagement of cognitive control processes, as indicated by more efficient error and conflict detection,” the researchers report. Participants who had spent more quality time with their instruments had "a better ability to detect errors and conflicts, and a reduced reactiveness to these detected problems.” (...) In other words, if you hit a wrong note, it’s important to be immediately aware of what you did wrong, but it’s just as important to not hesitate or second-guess yourself. You quickly take stock what happened and move on—a skill the musicians in the study applied to these two tests, and one players can presumably apply to an assortment of everyday challenges."

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Amira's curator insight, October 20, 2013 6:20 AM

"According to this research, people who spend many hours in the practice room not only process information unusually efficiently, but they also do a superior job of not letting occasional errors derail them.

These findings "suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed," (...) In addition, “higher levels of musical practice were also associated with a better engagement of cognitive control processes, as indicated by more efficient error and conflict detection,” the researchers report. Participants who had spent more quality time with their instruments had "a better ability to detect errors and conflicts, and a reduced reactiveness to these detected problems.” (...) In other words, if you hit a wrong note, it’s important to be immediately aware of what you did wrong, but it’s just as important to not hesitate or second-guess yourself. You quickly take stock what happened and move on—a skill the musicians in the study applied to these two tests, and one players can presumably apply to an assortment of everyday challenges."