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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Teens aren’t abandoning “social.” They’re just using the word correctly. — Understandings & Epiphanies — Medium

Advertisers are perplexed and a little angst-y.

I know this, because I work in advertising.

Via Darin Stevenson
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Darin Stevenson's curator insight, January 2, 11:05 AM

What this means is that teens are demonstrating a mode of intelligence that the adults »cannot muster.

And more: they know the difference between cohesion and being separated into little packs of diseases. How do they know?

Because that is what we do to them all day, every day.

Social media: We are doing it WRONG.

“Social” is what happens when someone posts personal information—photos, thoughts, announcements, favorite songs, jokes—on the internet and another person comes along and clicks a thumbs up icon or a star or a heart. If someone’s really “social,” they’ll even type a comment or reply.

Kids aren’t leaving social networks. They’re redefining the word “social.” Rather, they’re actually using the word with the intent of its original meaning: making contact with other human beings. Communicating. Back-and-forth, fairly immediate dialogue. Most of it digitally. But most of it with the intent of a conversation where two (or more) people are exchanging information and emotion. Not posting it. Exchanging it.”

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Smart Teenage Brains May Get Some Extra Learning Time

Smart Teenage Brains May Get Some Extra Learning Time | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

"Brain research is helping scientists tease out subtle differences in how teenagers learn. John Hewitt is a neuroscientist who studies the biology of intelligence. He knew intelligence has a strong biological component. If your parents are smart, you'll probably be smart — even without a lot of fuss about the right schools and learning environments. But recently, Hewitt discovered something that surprised him. 'Well, I may have been wrong,' he admits. 'It may well be that the environmental boost you can get, or the detriment you can suffer through adversity, may indeed be a little more important at a critical period in adolescence than I had previously thought. And this may especially be true for parents of very bright children.' What Hewitt, director of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado, is talking about is a new understanding of the interplay between your genetic inheritance and how you learn from the environment. He credits another researcher, Angela Brant, for coming up with a new insight into this critical period in development. So what is it about children that allows them to grasp the 'deep' knowledge of syntax more quickly than do adults? Neuroscientists think the reason children do better at such challenges is that young brains are more receptive to learning. The study, published in Psychological Science, suggests that for many children it may be a mistake to stop learning new things. Even if you're a teenager, it might not be too late to start learning Chinese, chess or the cello." | by Shankar Vedantam


Via Todd Reimer
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Mohsen Tahmasebi's comment, September 27, 2013 4:55 AM
Thanks for this post.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, October 12, 2013 1:54 AM
Thanks for this post