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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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What's the story about stories?

Conflict lies at the heart of storytelling, says Martin Lee. The researcher’s task is to find that conflict within the brief – and then resolve it.

 

 

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The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network

The Original Cupid Was a Sociopath | Bering in Mind, Scientific American Blog Network | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

It was the Roman writer Lucius Apuleius who brought Cupid to life in his ancient book of fables, The Golden Ass. Apuleius’s Cupid was no mischievous toddler with hummingbird wings but an impulsive god who rejoiced in causing sexual havoc for all earthly creatures. Even the fearless Apollo refers to Cupid as “serpent dire and fierce”:

 

Sharrock's insight:

“The destiny of the world is determined less by the battles that are lost and won than by the stories it loves and believes in.” —Harold Goddard

 

Cupid isn't who he was. Children's folklore and fables are almost lost to popular culture. 

 

Cultural euphemisms and white washes hit Grimm's tales and now, apparently, Roman fables: "Apuleius’s Cupid wasn't so much a romantic matchmaker as a devil subjecting hapless people to a toxic lust, one that blinded them with hypersexual urges. This allegory of a capricious god who pierces mortal hearts only to burden them with some scandalous attraction out of sheer boredom or as favors to other gods is reminiscent of nature’s cold mindlessness when it comes to human sexuality. Individuals with the most deviant desires have similarly found themselves at the whim of a terrible randomness. To learn more about the science of “erotic outliers,”

 What other tales were censored or re-written and popularized? 

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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 4:49 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
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snopes.com: Mussolini and On Time Trains

snopes.com: Mussolini and On Time Trains | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Did Mussolini make the trains run on time?
Sharrock's insight:

I thought about the statement about Mussolini getting the trains to run on time. Did he really? According to Snopes--Nope! 

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The Universal Shapes of Stories, According to Kurt Vonnegut

The Universal Shapes of Stories, According to Kurt Vonnegut | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

The fundamental concept behind Kurt Vonnegut's master's thesis in anthropology at the University of Chicago was, in Vonnegut's words, "that stories have shapes which can be drawn on graph paper."

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