Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Explores writing, applications of thought and theory, solutions, engineering, design, DIY, Interesting approaches to problems, examples of interdisciplinary explorations and solutions.
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The Purpose of Thinking

The Purpose of Thinking | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The purpose of thinking is to understand our world as best as possible. Our minds have evolved to think so that we can better adapt to our environment and make smarter decisions on how to survive and live.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Learn to identify when your thoughts are serving your interests and needs – and when they are leading you down a road to nowhere. If you can make this distinction, then you have already won half the battle with your thoughts."

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Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post

Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
The Washington Post's Sandra G. Boodman is looking for challenging medical cases--ones that have been resolved but in which the patient's symptoms were puzzling to doctors or suggested an immediate diagnosis that would have been wrong.
Sharrock's insight:

In some ways, better than TV because they are real. Some of the tv show episodes were apparently based on one or two of these articles. Some bring to mind what Daniel Kahneman states about expert intuition in Thinking, Fast and Slow: "Intuition is nothing more and nothing less than recognition." Daniel Sivers also noted from the book "Valid intuitions develop when experts have learned to recognize familiar elements in a new situation and to act in a manner that is appropriate to it." Key ideas are experience, expertise, dignostics, and training. But trust and perseverence also come to mind.

 

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Legal Intelligence

Legal Intelligence | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
There are a lot of great resources for primary law online, both free and fee. However, to get legal analysis and cutting edge thinking on current legal topics there are also some great resources for free online.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
Sharrock's insight:

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:15 AM

We should expose students to these kinds of resources as part of their common core learning pursuits. They do two things: these resources introduce students to laws, making connections between the government and citizenship. The second takewaway from reading these resources is the exposure to critical thinking. People need to learn that laws are interpreted and applied, not simply memorized and followed. Teachers can facilitate the learning of vocabulary, "context", logic, and reasoning. Students might also begin to access their imaginations, exploring how laws might impact their lives. People observe a great deal but don't know how to reflect on those experiences within domains. Psychology and sociology can focus some of that reflection, using vocabulary terms, models, and theory, Occassionally, a gifted teacher might find ways to apply maths. This isn't only about rational thinking. It is also about developing social and emotional intelligence.

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6 Weeks to Superhero

6 Weeks to Superhero | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it

Excerpt:When I'm hired to get an athlete, bodybuilder, or actor into the best shape of his life – to strip him of virtually all body fat while adding 15 to 20 pounds of functional "show" muscle – I have hundreds, maybe thousands, of protocols I can use to help him reach that goal.
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Via The WolfPack Media Group
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Study: Musical Training Teaches Us to Detect Our Own Mistakes and rapidly make needed adjustments

Study: Musical Training Teaches Us to Detect Our Own Mistakes and rapidly make needed adjustments | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
New research finds musical training appears to sharpen our ability to detect our own mistakes, and rapidly make needed adjustments.

Via Amira
Sharrock's insight:
Amira's insight:

"According to this research, people who spend many hours in the practice room not only process information unusually efficiently, but they also do a superior job of not letting occasional errors derail them.

These findings "suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed," (...) In addition, “higher levels of musical practice were also associated with a better engagement of cognitive control processes, as indicated by more efficient error and conflict detection,” the researchers report. Participants who had spent more quality time with their instruments had "a better ability to detect errors and conflicts, and a reduced reactiveness to these detected problems.” (...) In other words, if you hit a wrong note, it’s important to be immediately aware of what you did wrong, but it’s just as important to not hesitate or second-guess yourself. You quickly take stock what happened and move on—a skill the musicians in the study applied to these two tests, and one players can presumably apply to an assortment of everyday challenges."

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Amira's curator insight, October 20, 2013 6:20 AM

"According to this research, people who spend many hours in the practice room not only process information unusually efficiently, but they also do a superior job of not letting occasional errors derail them.

These findings "suggest that playing a musical instrument might improve the ability to monitor our behavior and adjust our responses effectively when needed," (...) In addition, “higher levels of musical practice were also associated with a better engagement of cognitive control processes, as indicated by more efficient error and conflict detection,” the researchers report. Participants who had spent more quality time with their instruments had "a better ability to detect errors and conflicts, and a reduced reactiveness to these detected problems.” (...) In other words, if you hit a wrong note, it’s important to be immediately aware of what you did wrong, but it’s just as important to not hesitate or second-guess yourself. You quickly take stock what happened and move on—a skill the musicians in the study applied to these two tests, and one players can presumably apply to an assortment of everyday challenges."

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How to avoid information overload

How to avoid information overload | Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions | Scoop.it
Maria Popova, editor of Brain Pickings, says we desperately need skilled knowledge curators to offset the risk of information overload.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 23, 2013 12:52 PM

This is an interesting article in large part, because it references thinking that is over 50 years old. The problem is not a new one. What is new is the new scale of information and the lack of voice saying we have to find a a way to come to terms with it.